Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Sandy Bridge i7 vs Ivy Bridge i7

Last response: in CPUs
Share
May 1, 2012 5:03:33 PM

I am going to be building a new system within the next 6 months. I would like an 2nd gen or 3rd gen i7 processor, but will I be able to see much of a difference between any of them?

i7 2600k vs i7 2700k vs i7 3770k

Are there major selling points in any of these that I should worry about or are they all going to perform similar.

I will be doing 3d work, video editing, gaming, programming, etc... I want something that will last for the next 3 years at least.

I meant to change the name of this thread my bad....
May 1, 2012 5:07:23 PM

If you are going to be video rendering the i7 3770k has much better performance than the 2600k or the 2700k. Where the 2600k or 2700k are more beneficial is if you don't need to render much but want to overclock as they keep cooler temperatures than the 3770k.
May 1, 2012 5:10:49 PM

licktheenvelope said:
If you are going to be video rendering the i7 3770k has much better performance than the 2600k or the 2700k. Where the 2600k or 2700k are more beneficial is if you don't need to render much but want to overclock as they keep cooler temperatures than the 3770k.


I will be rendering quite a lot. I dont plan on overclocking but I might, only if I need to.
Related resources
a b à CPUs
May 1, 2012 5:10:59 PM

Robopolo said:
I am going to be building a new system within the next 6 months. I would like an 2nd gen or 3rd gen i7 processor, but will I be able to see much of a difference between any of them?

i7 2600k vs i7 2700k vs i7 3770k

Are there major selling points in any of these that I should worry about or are they all going to perform similar.

I will be doing 3d work, video editing, gaming, programming, etc... I want something that will last for the next 3 years at least.

I meant to change the name of this thread my bad....


What CPU do you have at the moment?

There is no performance gain between SB and IB. Some heat issues are reported while OCing IB. Intel has acknowledged it and may probably fix it in future (hopefully asap). If you are using one of the older generation of CPUs 2 core or 2 quad core, I would recommend the i7 3770K.....If you are already having one of those i7 processors, it is not worth buying a new system immediately. You may wait for Haswell, if not Skylake. Please see if you could overclock your existing CPU.

Your work is more about processor and RAM power and speed. A good GPU would be very useful (may be you would need the best of both worlds - gaming and work).

a c 188 à CPUs
May 1, 2012 5:14:36 PM

The major difference between these processors comes down to new features on the Intel® Core™ i7-3770K like native USB 3.0 and PCI-E 3.0 that are not support. The only issue that the 3rd generation Intel Core processors have is that they do run hot if you overclock them so make sure that you have a good cooling solution.


Christian Wood
Intel Enthusiast Team
a b à CPUs
May 1, 2012 5:15:44 PM

3770k
May 1, 2012 5:18:37 PM

SSri said:
What CPU do you have at the moment?

There is no performance gain between SB and IB. Some heat issues are reported while OCing IB. Intel has acknowledged it and may probably fix it in future (hopefully asap). If you are using one of the older generation of CPUs 2 core or 2 quad core, I would recommend the i7 3770K.....If you are already having one of those i7 processors, it is not worth buying a new system immediately. You may wait for Haswell, if not Skylake. Please see if you could overclock your existing CPU.

Your work is more about processor and RAM power and speed. A good GPU would be very useful (may be you would need the best of both worlds - gaming and work).


I am currently on a Q9000 laptop. It works but it is not much for gaming. I can edit on it pretty well though.

I am a console fanboy so I will mainly game on my xbox 360 either way. I will do some gaming on it but nothing to intense.

What I was thinking of doing was building a solid pc with one of these processors and just upgrading to Haswell, next year. I heard that the z77 boards were going to be compatible with Haswell so I was going to use one of those.
May 1, 2012 5:29:26 PM

IntelEnthusiast said:
The major difference between these processors comes down to new features on the Intel® Core™ i7-3770K like native USB 3.0 and PCI-E 3.0 that are not support. The only issue that the 3rd generation Intel Core processors have is that they do run hot if you overclock them so make sure that you have a good cooling solution.


Christian Wood
Intel Enthusiast Team


Do you think there is any "real world" difference or is it within 5% improvement going with the Ivy Bridge.

I can get the 2600k for $285 no tax right now. I am not going to but I think that they Sandy Bridge i7s will go down a bit in price.
May 1, 2012 5:58:31 PM

PCI-express 2.0 is already limiting the compute power of a Radeon 7970 so I would go for a 3770k as it will allow a PCI-express 3.0 GPU and you may need it in three years.
May 1, 2012 6:00:42 PM

doive1231 said:
PCI-express 2.0 is already limiting the compute power of a Radeon 7970 so I would go for a 3770k as it will allow a PCI-express 3.0 GPU and you may need it in three years.


This is something else I was going to make a thread over. I am guessing that there is a big speed difference between PCI-E 2.0 and PCI-E 3.0?
a b à CPUs
May 1, 2012 6:15:39 PM

What's your budget?

If you are building a PC now and OC it, you are set for anoher 3-4 years. I won't upgrade Haswell.
a c 283 à CPUs
May 1, 2012 6:21:22 PM

Robopolo said:
This is something else I was going to make a thread over. I am guessing that there is a big speed difference between PCI-E 2.0 and PCI-E 3.0?


With any current single card/single GPU config, no there really isn't much of a difference (single digit percentages, which can be attributed to margin of error, IMO). It's when you go to SLI/CrossFire with high end PCIe 3.0 cards that PCIe 3.0 can stretch it's legs. A generation or two from now with GPU's is when it'll really start to matter for single card configs.

In any case, since you're building a new rig, there's really no reason, other than decreased OC potential, not to go with Ivy at this point. It won't be much faster than a comparable Sandy chip, but it gives you the benefits that Ivy offers.
May 1, 2012 6:22:53 PM

SSri said:
What's your budget?

If you are building a PC now and OC it, you are set for anoher 3-4 years. I won't upgrade Haswell.


My budget is $1500. I really would like to have an 3 monitor setup with eyefinity, but I would be really pushing it.

I wont be buying it until after summer more than likely. How big of an improvement is Haswell going to be? Speculation of course :) 
May 1, 2012 6:27:31 PM

DJDeCiBeL said:
With any current single card/single GPU config, no there really isn't much of a difference (single digit percentages, which can be attributed to margin of error, IMO). It's when you go to SLI/CrossFire with high end PCIe 3.0 cards that PCIe 3.0 can stretch it's legs. A generation or two from now with GPU's is when it'll really start to matter for single card configs.


I do plan on crossfiring two radeon cards at some point. Whether I go with the 7000 series or the 6000 series depended on this question.
a b à CPUs
May 1, 2012 8:00:19 PM

Haswell is too far away to take a call. If you are buying after Summer, let's revisit the spec at that time. A lot of things would change between now and then!
a b à CPUs
May 1, 2012 8:13:35 PM

BigMack70 said:
This means that Ivy Bridge is the CPU for you! i7-3770k is your best bet.


+1

But too early to draw specs for puchases after summer.
a c 101 à CPUs
May 2, 2012 12:19:04 AM

SSri said:
Intel has acknowledged it and may probably fix it in future (hopefully asap).

They acknowledged it and said it was as-expected. Since it runs hotter by-design (they switched from solder to paste thermal interface under the heat-spreader on top of higher power density), there is nothing for Intel to fix until/unless something happens to force Intel to revert to solder TIM.
May 2, 2012 1:01:36 AM

SSri said:
Haswell is too far away to take a call. If you are buying after Summer, let's revisit the spec at that time. A lot of things would change between now and then!


Okay, do you think it would be a good idea to have everything else picked out, except the processor? I know for the most part what I want, but the processor is the most crucial and controversial aspect of the build.
May 2, 2012 3:48:23 AM

Thanks guys for all of the help I will be trying to learn more about all of the new processors and the rest while I am saving money for the build.
a c 101 à CPUs
May 2, 2012 4:31:21 AM

Robopolo said:
but the processor is the most crucial and controversial aspect of the build.

Not much controversy there. The best all-around CPU is i7-3770k with i5-3570k right behind for gaming-centric rigs. The i7-3nnnX LGA2011 CPUs are for the extreme high-end with a huge jump in price tag, not worth the trouble for most people. The money saved by going with i5/i7 will cover most of your next upgrade 2-3 years down the road unless you really need features from the X-series CPUs in the near future.
a c 447 à CPUs
May 2, 2012 4:53:55 AM

doive1231 said:
PCI-express 2.0 is already limiting the compute power of a Radeon 7970 so I would go for a 3770k as it will allow a PCI-express 3.0 GPU and you may need it in three years.


That's interesting... Do you have a link to a review of a Radeon HD 7970 in a PCI-e 2.0 and PCI-e 3.0 slot?
a c 101 à CPUs
May 2, 2012 5:26:43 AM

jaguarskx said:
That's interesting... Do you have a link to a review of a Radeon HD 7970 in a PCI-e 2.0 and PCI-e 3.0 slot?

He probably meant "limiting compute" as in GPGPU/DirectCompute/OpenCL. There aren't many benchmarks on that, Anandtech tried to test it but the only benchmark they found where PCIe3 made any remotely significant difference was AMD's AES Encrypt/Decrypt where there was only a 9% difference on Radeon 7970.

The difference would probably become more tangible with multi-card GPGPU.
a b à CPUs
May 2, 2012 7:04:53 AM

Robopolo said:
Okay, do you think it would be a good idea to have everything else picked out, except the processor? I know for the most part what I want, but the processor is the most crucial and controversial aspect of the build.


No. If your build is going to be after Summer, I would drop a cent now. Please wait; the 3-6 is a long time. Things can change (price, new product, new reviews, etc..).
May 2, 2012 4:32:54 PM

SSri said:
No. If your build is going to be after Summer, I would drop a cent now. Please wait; the 3-6 is a long time. Things can change (price, new product, new reviews, etc..).

Okay, I will keep doing research and find out more about the different components. Hopefully by the end of summer I will have the money I need and be able to get a nice system. Thanks for all of the help.
a c 188 à CPUs
May 2, 2012 4:40:51 PM

Robopolo said:
Do you think there is any "real world" difference or is it within 5% improvement going with the Ivy Bridge.

I can get the 2600k for $285 no tax right now. I am not going to but I think that they Sandy Bridge i7s will go down a bit in price.



Like most things in the computer industry it is very hard to tell the difference for the average user between two products unless you start to benchmark them. The 5% doesn't cover anything from PCI-E 3.0 or getting any value out of the Intel HD 4000 graphics. So I try to look forward when advising people on their money I try to advise based not only right now but into the future.


Christian Wood
Intel Enthusiast Team
May 2, 2012 4:52:54 PM

IntelEnthusiast said:
Like most things in the computer industry it is very hard to tell the difference for the average user between two products unless you start to benchmark them. The 5% doesn't cover anything from PCI-E 3.0 or getting any value out of the Intel HD 4000 graphics. So I try to look forward when advising people on their money I try to advise based not only right now but into the future.


Christian Wood
Intel Enthusiast Team


Okay, I will try to look into the benchmarks and specs more. I wont be buying this until after summer so I have time to do more research and look into this more. Thanks for the response.
a b à CPUs
May 2, 2012 5:43:07 PM

Robopolo said:
Okay, I will keep doing research and find out more about the different components. Hopefully by the end of summer I will have the money I need and be able to get a nice system. Thanks for all of the help.


Happy to be of help. Your work is 3D, video, programming...so you need a powerful processor. I would be tempted to tip my hand in favour of i7 3930K. It is a beast...6 core and a 12 tread. With a good mobo, you can overclock it to 4.5GHz in a single click (Asus mobo). The best part is you can buy Intel protection plan for the overclock that would cost you about $35 or something..

This is food for thought...think about it
May 2, 2012 10:15:35 PM

SSri said:
Happy to be of help. Your work is 3D, video, programming...so you need a powerful processor. I would be tempted to tip my hand in favour of i7 3930K. It is a beast...6 core and a 12 tread. With a good mobo, you can overclock it to 4.5GHz in a single click (Asus mobo). The best part is you can buy Intel protection plan for the overclock that would cost you about $35 or something..

This is food for thought...think about it


I am not afraid to spend a lot of money on a new build. I know I am going to be using it A LOT. I just dont want to go cheap on any of the other components.

One thing I really liked about the Sandy Bridge-E series was the fact that you could use quad channel memory. Do you think that the extra $200 is worth it? Will I see a MAJOR increase in speed and performance or is this one of those things that is for bragging rights. I will definitely consider it if it is worth it.
a b à CPUs
May 3, 2012 5:27:23 AM

The extreme series i7 3960X is almost double the price for a minor improvement with an extra 3MB L3 cache. Being expensvie does not mean superior performance. It is a very good CPU. But compared to 3930K, you are unlikely to see any noticeable difference in performance. Throw that money in on a very good Mobo or double the RAM.....that can give you future proof (a mobo that can take SB and IB)...you may comfortably overclock 3930K to 4.5 GHz without worrying about stability. If I were you, I would not worry about the E-Series at this moment. BTW, the 3930K is also a quad-channel memory.
a b à CPUs
May 3, 2012 5:29:35 AM

To me, i7 3930K to overclock, a 32GB or a 64GB RAM and a mobo that gives you the ability to replace the CPU in the future are the way forward
May 3, 2012 6:38:28 PM

SSri said:
To me, i7 3930K to overclock, a 32GB or a 64GB RAM and a mobo that gives you the ability to replace the CPU in the future are the way forward

The i7 3930k is a part of the Sandy Bridge-E series....

I do not think I will go with the 3930k because I dont think I am willing to spend "that much" on just the processor. I do not know if I would use the processor to its fullest potential anyway. I might be interested in the 3820k though...

I have heard mixed reviews on the 3820k, what do you think about the little brother to the 3930k? It still gives me the 64gb Ram option.

Quote:
(a mobo that can take SB and IB)


Is there a mobo that can support SB and IB and the SB-E series? If so, that is definitely a must have.
a b à CPUs
May 3, 2012 7:13:10 PM

Robopolo said:
I do not think I will go with the 3930k because I dont think I am willing to spend "that much" on just the processor. I do not know if I would use the processor to its fullest potential anyway. I might be interested in the 3820k though...

I have heard mixed reviews on the 3820k, what do you think about the little brother to the 3930k? It still gives me the 64gb Ram option.


The 3820 is 4 core / 8 tread, it is still good compared to 3930K. You will benefit from both of them, while the 3930K is 6 core to get 12 tread. The extra cores/treads will come pretty handy with all CPU intensive work.

i7 3820 = 9665 CPU benchmark
i73930K = 13578 CPU benchmark points.


Robopolo said:
Is there a mobo that can support SB and IB and the SB-E series? If so, that is definitely a must have


yes. there are...Asus Maximus Gene V is one such example. It can take 32 GB only. I need to check if other asus (x79 or Rampage IV) have firmware upgrades that take the IB as well. If I am not wrong (I need to check that), z77 would take both. I will check some of them and post this week.
a b à CPUs
May 3, 2012 7:21:20 PM

All LGA 1155 AND LGA 2011 will support SB/IB CPUs...
May 3, 2012 7:32:58 PM

SSri said:
All LGA 1155 AND LGA 2011 will support SB/IB CPUs...


So you think it would be better to go with the 3820k.... I will look into LGA 2011 more because I think if they support SB/IB CPUs there is no reason not to go with the LGA 2011 and the 3820k.

Performance wise what do you think about the 3820k compared to the 3770k? Do you think I will need a pretty good cooling system because of the 3820's high temps?

I really appreciate all of the advice. Thanks man.
May 3, 2012 8:07:03 PM

SSri said:
All LGA 1155 AND LGA 2011 will support SB/IB CPUs...


I think I might have misunderstood you. From what I have seen, the LGA 2011 and LGA 1155 cant support the other. My bad.
I guess that narrows it down to the 3820k or the 3770k.

Is there anyway to leave you good rep or something? I have not found anything yet.
a b à CPUs
May 3, 2012 8:14:14 PM

Robopolo said:
So you think it would be better to go with the 3820k.... I will look into LGA 2011 more because I think if they support SB/IB CPUs there is no reason not to go with the LGA 2011 and the 3820k.

Performance wise what do you think about the 3820k compared to the 3770k? Do you think I will need a pretty good cooling system because of the 3820's high temps?

.


The 3770K problem is overclocking heat. It is not a great step up from SB. You have to live with the heat issue with the IB if you overclock it. Tom's review of 3770K shows the overclocked 3770K is roughly 7-10 deg more than SB. That's a lot. The 3770K is a little better than 3930K in his view. Since 3820 is step-down from 3930K, the performance difference between 3820 and 3770K must be skewed sizeably in favour of the IB. Many reviews report IB is vulnerable if you overclock..Can the overclocked 3770K hold ground for a long term (2 - 3 years). I do not know. Some report 3770K should be fine until 4.5 GHz. So, if I were to choose 3930K or 3770K, I would go for 3930K (though expensive) as I need those extra 2 cores / 4 treads for my work. If this were to be true in your case, you should shell out the exra $250. If you are rendering in a farm, probably you will be fine with either 3820 or 3770K. Both are attractive from costs reason compared to 3930K. I am unable to find a comparision of 3820, 3770 and 3930K. I will post if I find one.

In short, I would choose 3930K over 3770K. Between 3770K and 3820, I would probably lean towards IB 3770K and take the risk of an excessive heat.

With the IB CPU, you can take the z77.

Read these reviews, mull over and weigh the costs vs benefits between 3930K, 3820 and 3770K, and choose. They boil down to your job profile, costs vs benefits.

http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/ivy-bridge-benchmark-core...
http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/z77-extreme6-z77a-gd65-z7...

In closing, i7 3930K, 3820 and 3770K are all excellent CPUs. The main differences are costs and extra cores/treads, while IB stands down in the temperature department.

Take your time, don't be in a hurry...

Happy to be of some help :-)

a b à CPUs
May 3, 2012 8:15:36 PM

Robopolo said:


Is there anyway to leave you good rep or something? I have not found anything yet.


Sorry...I did not quite catch that...


a b à CPUs
May 3, 2012 8:16:52 PM

While mulling over 3770K, 3820 and 3930K, remember you have 6 months (until summer) to decide...So don't be in a hurry...
May 3, 2012 8:26:52 PM

SSri said:
Sorry...I did not quite catch that...


Okay, I guess not :lol: 

I am not used to this type of forum layout :) 
May 3, 2012 8:29:13 PM

SSri said:
While mulling over 3770K, 3820 and 3930K, remember you have 6 months (until summer) to decide...So don't be in a hurry...


Oh, I wont. I just want to make sure that when I want to buy everything, I am not humming over everything then. I also am trying to learn more about the specs and the technical issues while I am considering all of the parts.
a b à CPUs
May 3, 2012 8:31:48 PM

I will do some research on SB/IB compatible mobos and post as soon as I collect the details...
May 3, 2012 8:33:18 PM

SSri said:
I will do some research on SB/IB compatible mobos and post as soon as I collect the details...

Okay, I will keep looking up on it as well. Thanks
a b à CPUs
May 3, 2012 8:34:09 PM

Robopolo said:
Oh, I wont. I just want to make sure that when I want to buy everything, I am not humming over everything then. I also am trying to learn more about the specs and the technical issues while I am considering all of the parts.


between now and the next 6, there may be many changes in technology....take it easy...you will be fine..
a b à CPUs
May 3, 2012 9:18:49 PM

This seems to have been written for you...i7 3930K vs i7 3820.

http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/core-i7-3930k-3820-test-b...

He finds a little justification in buying i7 3820 over i7 2600K. Compare this review with the review of i7 3770K vs i7 3930K.

You should hopefully narrow down your choices between 3930K and 3770K.

a b à CPUs
May 3, 2012 9:41:09 PM

licktheenvelope said:
If you are going to be video rendering the i7 3770k has much better performance than the 2600k or the 2700k. Where the 2600k or 2700k are more beneficial is if you don't need to render much but want to overclock as they keep cooler temperatures than the 3770k.


Performance in video rendering is virtually the same for the 3770k and 2700k. But there is really very little point in getting the 2700k. The 3770k is a direct replacement and will shortly supplant it in the range.

Best solution

a b à CPUs
May 3, 2012 10:02:58 PM
Share

Summarising the whole ambiguity:

Large sized RAM (32 GB or more) is the base in this recommendation:

In the SB series, cost of 2820, performance wise, is not justified over 2600K. In video and high performance job, 3930K wins because the extra cores/treads with a large RAM make a difference. Between 3770K and 3930K, the 3770K is not better. For video and high performance, 3930K is still a better choice and is probably worth the cost. Pre-i7 owners would most likely upgrade to IB, while the i7 or SB folks won't. Performance and power PC (pre i7) folks may opt for i7 3930K.

Recommendation: Are you a pre-i7 guy? Take i7 3770K, throw-in a robust water cooler motherboard, at least 32GB RAM AND a top-of the line PSU. Moderately overclock (less tha or equal to 4.5 GHz) and install a good cooler. This setup will be excellent but less powerful than 3930K. Chances are you may not notice the difference.

if you are having an i7 system, try overclock it and hang-in there for Haswell, unless your work desperately needs a new build immeidately.


May 4, 2012 4:51:12 PM

SSri said:
Summarising the whole ambiguity:

Large sized RAM (32 GB or more) is the base in this recommendation:

In the SB series, cost of 2820, performance wise, is not justified over 2600K. In video and high performance job, 3930K wins because the extra cores/treads with a large RAM make a difference. Between 3770K and 3930K, the 3770K is not better. For video and high performance, 3930K is still a better choice and is probably worth the cost. Pre-i7 owners would most likely upgrade to IB, while the i7 or SB folks won't. Performance and power PC (pre i7) folks may opt for i7 3930K.

Recommendation: Are you a pre-i7 guy? Take i7 3770K, throw-in a robust water cooler motherboard, at least 32GB RAM AND a top-of the line PSU. Moderately overclock (less tha or equal to 4.5 GHz) and install a good cooler. This setup will be excellent but less powerful than 3930K. Chances are you may not notice the difference.

if you are having an i7 system, try overclock it and hang-in there for Haswell, unless your work desperately needs a new build immeidately.


Those articles gave me a really good comparison of the processors. Since I am a "pre i7" guy I think it would be better for me to go with the 3770k. I do not think it is worth doubling the price of my processor for a little benefit with the 3930k. I might be able to build a more powerful rig with it, but I dont think I would see the difference to much in rendering or gaming.

As for the 3820k, I thought it was holding its ground, but the 3770k is on the same level as it, if not better.

I have a feeling either way I go, both "builds" would last me a long time. I will plan on going with the 3770k, but if anything changes in the summer (Haswell leaks, or IB-E), I will not rush.

I really appreciate all of the help, and the links to those articles. Thanks a lot :) 
May 4, 2012 4:52:12 PM

Best answer selected by Robopolo.
a b à CPUs
May 5, 2012 12:06:55 AM

happy to help...cheers
!