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Computer Turns On then Off Immediately

Last response: in Systems
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January 19, 2012 11:34:45 AM

The thread topic basically explains it all. I started to assemble my computer outside of the case, on top of the motherboard box. When I got the CPU, stock Intel heatsink, 2 sticks of RAM, and the graphics card installed and after plugging in my 24pin, 8pin, and 2 6pins for my motherboard, CPU, and graphics card respectively, I attempted to boot. The CPU, PSU, and GPU fans turned on and then immediately turned off. After a few seconds the system will try again, but with the same result. This continues until I flip the switch on the PSU. Never makes it to POST.

After reseating the CPU and checking to make sure the heatsink was on properly, I was getting the same result. I started googling and found this:

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-perform-ste...

I have tried every step of this with no luck. I did the paperclip trick (plug it into the green and a black pin the 20pin PSU connector) to test my PSU. It worked. It was also used in my older build from 2007 and was working not even 3 hours before the install began to fail.

Tried this as well:

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/262730-31-breadboardi...

Not getting a "no memory" beep when only the CPU and heatsink are installed with nothing else.

Per jdenova007's question further down the page: I did check the CPU pins, everything looks good.

Also, the "Dr. Debug" LEDs on the motherboard do not turn on.

Here are my computers specs:

Intel Core i5 2500k
ASRock p67 Extreme 4 Gen 3
OCZ 700w PSU (as I said, from spring 2007)
Corsair Vengence 8GB DDR3 1600 (4GBx2)
ATI/AMD MSI 4870

That's all I have connected to the computer when I get this result. I can post additional specs if needed but since they aren't even plugged in yet, I didn't think it would matter.

Thanks in advance for any help you guys can provide! I'm at work at the moment so I won't be able to test ideas until 5:30 PM EST.
a b à CPUs
January 19, 2012 12:38:38 PM

You mention a 20 pin connector. Doesn't that motherboard require a 24-pin connector?
There are adapters that will convert a 20-pin to a 24-pin rather than just plugging the 20-pin into the MB connector & leaving 4 pins unused.
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January 19, 2012 12:47:54 PM

Quote:
You mention a 20 pin connector. Doesn't that motherboard require a 24-pin connector?


First, thanks for the reply.

The board doesn't seem to require a 24pin (per the manual). However, my PSU has a 20+4 connector setup. I was just referring to the 20pin portion of it.

I have been working with the full 20+4 connector plugged in.
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January 19, 2012 1:47:37 PM

dbrinks said:
Quote:
You mention a 20 pin connector. Doesn't that motherboard require a 24-pin connector?


First, thanks for the reply.

The board doesn't seem to require a 24pin (per the manual). However, my PSU has a 20+4 connector setup. I was just referring to the 20pin portion of it.

I have been working with the full 20+4 connector plugged in.

I still think that you have a power issue, as in not plugging in the 4 (or 8) pin ECPS connector, or the PSU being bad. :heink:  :cry: 
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January 19, 2012 2:36:38 PM

Quote:
I still think that you have a power issue, as in not plugging in the 4 (or 8) pin ECPS connector, or the PSU being bad. :heink:  :cry: 


I have my PSU 2 4pin CPU connectors plugged in.

My PSU would have had to go bad between the time I removed it from my older system and plugged it into the new one. haha. It is nearly 5 years old though... I can try plugging it back into the older computer when I get home just to see if anything happens.

Suppose I'd rather have a bad PSU than a bad CPU/Motherboard....
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January 19, 2012 3:05:37 PM

I'd go with Motherboard... if you get no beeps when memory isn't installed then your motherboard is probably the culprit. You will know soon enough when you put your PSU back into your old PC though.... Good luck.
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January 19, 2012 3:17:13 PM

Just curious, if I were to remove the CPU and try booting, what would happen?

I ask this because I am wondering if there is a good way to tell if the problem is my motherboard or my CPU. Looking online at others who have had my problem and the consensus is that it's either the motherboard or CPU. :??: 
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January 19, 2012 3:32:31 PM

It won't hurt anything... but I doubt it will even attempt to turn on... it also won't verify your issue... it still won't boot without the CPU... so doing that gets you nowhere.... Motherboards fail FAR more often than CPU's. CPU's rarely fail(unless you're overclocking at fry it - even then it is difficult to kill a CPU)....

EDIT - Please verify your CPU pins are not bent at all... they will be on the motherboard.. they should look uniform.
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January 19, 2012 3:40:37 PM

Quote:
EDIT - Please verify your CPU pins are not bent at all... they will be on the motherboard.. they should look uniform.


I should have included that in the original post. Pins looked perfect.
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January 19, 2012 4:59:16 PM

Found this on ASRock's website:

http://www.asrock.com/support/faq.asp?id=286

I'm in the "no beep" and "no debug" category, it's looking like I may have a faulty CPU.

I am probably going to head to Microcenter this weekend and exchange the i5 for another. Maybe they can pop it in a motherboard to see if it actually is faulty. Probably just take both CPU and motherboard, just in case.

Thanks for all the help guys, appreciate it!
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January 19, 2012 5:25:34 PM

Please be sure to respond with your resolution.... for future reference... Thanks
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January 21, 2012 11:13:58 PM

Ended up I had a faulty motherboard. Went back to Microcenter this morning and exchange for a new one. Got home, put it all together and on the first try it worked!

Thanks for the help guys :) 
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January 21, 2012 11:14:12 PM

Best answer selected by dbrinks.
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a b à CPUs
January 22, 2012 8:33:47 AM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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