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PSU for a nvidia 560ti

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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November 22, 2011 5:30:09 PM

Im currently running a Nvidia 9800GT with a Intel core 2 quad Q8200 CPU and 4 sticks of DDR2 ram totaling 6GB on a 500W PSU. Im thinking about upgrading to a Nvidia 560TI so I can run stuff on ultra settings but will I need a new PSU for this set up?

edit:
Its OCZ, http://www.novatech.co.uk/products/components/powersupp...

More about : psu nvidia 560ti

a b U Graphics card
November 22, 2011 5:33:26 PM

The 560 Ti uses 170 watts of power, about 14 amps. Check to see if your PSU can output at least 23 amps of power on the +12V rail (more if you intend on overclocking).

Edit: up to 170 watts, based on the TDP in Wikipedia. With a 500-watt PSU, you should be good to go with a very high chance, even with a small amount of overclocking.
November 22, 2011 5:37:28 PM

I dont plan on overclocking because I'm not very experianced with PC hardware hence this thread. My PSU reads;

+12V1 = 18A
+12V2 = 18A

So Im guessing that means its not enough? you say it uses 14A but to check if it outputs 23A?
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a b U Graphics card
November 22, 2011 6:37:57 PM

You have 2 rails and they combine to 36 amps so you're fine. However, you can't get a single card with more than 18 amps. Put the video card on one of those +12V rails, and the other components (the HDD, CPU, etc.) on the other and you'll be fine.
a c 273 U Graphics card
a c 172 Î Nvidia
November 22, 2011 6:40:30 PM

ulillillia said:
You have 2 rails and they combine to 36 amps so you're fine. However, you can't get a single card with more than 18 amps. Put the video card on one of those +12V rails, and the other components (the HDD, CPU, etc.) on the other and you'll be fine.

Incorrect, you don't determine the amperage of the PSU by combining two rails.
November 22, 2011 6:41:38 PM

ulillillia said:
You have 2 rails and they combine to 36 amps so you're fine. However, you can't get a single card with more than 18 amps. Put the video card on one of those +12V rails, and the other components (the HDD, CPU, etc.) on the other and you'll be fine.


ah great, thanks. I had no idea before

edit: oh... maybe not?
a b U Graphics card
November 22, 2011 6:51:19 PM

Mousemonkey said:
Incorrect, you don't determine the amperage of the PSU by combining two rails.


I've seen on this very site that they combine, in a way. I am aware that you can't have more than 18 amps on each rail. However, if you put 18 amps on one rail, and 18 on the other, this totals 36 and would still work, but a 19 and 17 won't. I should've been clearer.
a c 273 U Graphics card
a c 172 Î Nvidia
November 22, 2011 6:53:39 PM

ulillillia said:
I've seen on this very site that they combine, in a way. I am aware that you can't have more than 18 amps on each rail. However, if you put 18 amps on one rail, and 18 on the other, this totals 36 and would still work, but a 19 and 17 won't. I should've been clearer.

The amperage of a PSU is determined by its wattage not two 12v rails, please show where you got this combine notion from.
a c 199 U Graphics card
a b Î Nvidia
November 22, 2011 7:08:41 PM

The total 12V amperage available may be something like 28A, but each rail into which that 28A was divided may be current-limited to 18A.
A GTX560Ti can be run on a quality 500W PSU, but not on a cheap generic.
What brand and model (not just wattage) is that "500W" PSU? If it is a cheap generic (something like Diablotek, Logisys, or Apevia) it may be significantly overrated, and really be good for perhaps 60% of what's on the label. If it is a Seasonic or Antec, it is likely actually good for a little more than what is on the label.
November 22, 2011 7:12:20 PM

Onus said:
The total 12V amperage available may be something like 28A, but each rail into which that 28A was divided may be current-limited to 18A.
A GTX560Ti can be run on a quality 500W PSU, but not on a cheap generic.
What brand and model (not just wattage) is that "500W" PSU? If it is a cheap generic (something like Diablotek, Logisys, or Apevia) it may be significantly overrated, and really be good for perhaps 60% of what's on the label. If it is a Seasonic or Antec, it is likely actually good for a little more than what is on the label.


Its OCZ, http://www.novatech.co.uk/products/components/powersupp...
a b U Graphics card
November 23, 2011 1:48:18 PM

Mousemonkey said:
The amperage of a PSU is determined by its wattage not two 12v rails, please show where you got this combine notion from.


This thread on these very forums mentions of the combining of the rails. It's even in bold. I've been thinking it was 8 amps extra that gets added, not 15 (20 if the safety margin is included) - I'll need to consider that for the future. No one's perfect and mistakes are expected to happen.

@phync Sorry about my mistake/oversight. Wikipedia shows that the 560 Ti has a TDP of 170 which means slightly more than 14 amps at the maximum for the video card. With a 15-amp usage for the others, you should be fine there. So, as long as that video card is on a separate rail and you have the likely PCI-express power connector the card demands, you should be fine.
a c 273 U Graphics card
a c 172 Î Nvidia
November 23, 2011 1:51:26 PM

ulillillia said:
This thread on these very forums mentions of the combining of the rails. It's even in bold. I've been thinking it was 8 amps extra that gets added, not 15 (20 if the safety margin is included) - I'll need to consider that for the future. No one's perfect and mistakes are expected to happen.

@phync Sorry about my mistake/oversight. Wikipedia shows that the 560 Ti has a TDP of 170 which means slightly more than 14 amps at the maximum for the video card. With a 15-amp usage for the others, you should be fine there. So, as long as that video card is on a separate rail and you have the likely PCI-express power connector the card demands, you should be fine.

Now you know why that thread never got stickied.
a b U Graphics card
November 23, 2011 2:25:17 PM

That thread was linked to from here, of which is a sticky thread.
!