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New Ivy Bridge Work Build $1,500

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January 21, 2012 6:09:26 PM

New Ivy Bridge Work Build $1,500

We need a new computer mostly for work (personal as well). We use Adobe CS, Word, Photo Shop, Office, XSite Pro and more almost everyday. We have to build our own websites create our own product description videos and DVD's and do fairly large uploads to our manufacturer.

I'm a bit confused with some of the new stuff out now and not sure what to get that would be best for our needs at a decent price. I don't know which would be best for us at this point between Intel or the AMD F1 or APU thing or what.

In following the article *How To Ask For New Build Advice*:

Purchase date: around June/July 2012 (after the bios, drivers and bugs have been worked out on the z77 & Ivy Bridge)

Budget Range: $1,000 to $1,500

System Usage from Most to Least Important: For work - Adobe CS, Office, Word, Photo Shop, XSite Pro, powerpoint lectures, making/rendering HD videos and music, watching movies, occasional minor online gaming.

Parts Not Required: keyboard, mouse, monitor, speakers... We got a new Asus VH222 monitor 1.5 years ago. 500g HD 6 months old but, would love a new SSD.

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: Newegg is fine

Country: USA

Parts Preferences: Unsure, I think I want...

Case with removable dust filters, great air flow, quite
at least a quad-core CPU
8g minimum preferably 16g DDR3 1600 RAM

Overclocking: We will never overclock anything, we want a long lifespan.

SLI or Crossfire: We will never use more than one GPU

Additional Comments:

Quite, low energy consumption (we're always working), low heat &/or great air flow, reliable PC with no compatibility or downtime issues, lots of multi-tasking capability. It would be great if we could network between the desktop & a laptop (don't have laptop yet) at some point. We will need a laptop to do powerpoint lectures across several countries at the end of this year.

Price is an issue, I might be able to stretch to $1,500 max by July if it's really worth it (I'm curious about Ivy Bridge)... we'll see. I wanted the new, next generation hardware i.e. USB 3 (pretty standard now) and PCIe 3.0 (still not available by AMD). I was hoping for a mobo that included all gen 3 features and lose all the USB 2, PCIe 2 sata 2 etc and go all gen 3 since it's all backwards compatible but, that may not happen until Haswell.
January 21, 2012 6:35:35 PM

Oh yea, would prefer a mid-tower size case
would like to be able to get into 3D graphics and web design
Windows 7, 64-bit Operating System
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January 23, 2012 6:49:54 PM

It sure would be sweet to have the new Ivy Bridge when it comes out in a couple months but, I'm concerned about costs.

http://www.tomshardware.com/news/core-i7-Ivy-Bridge-77w...

Plus, what options or features would I be missing out by going with Intel? I've only ever had AMD due to the high price of Intel products.
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January 26, 2012 5:06:32 PM

The current system to see what I'm dealing with here is ...

CPU: AMD 1.6 Sempron (upgraded to 2.1 Athlon 3200 two years ago)
GPU: onboard
Mobo: MSI RS480M
HD: WD 80g (upgraded to WD 500g last year)
RAM: 512 (upgraded to 2g two years ago)
PSU: 250w
OS: XP

I'd prefer:

MB: GIGABYTE z77 UD 3 or 5
CPU: Ivy Bridge i7 3770
RAM: 8 or 16g
SSD: Intel 520 Cherryville 120g or Mushkin?
HD: ?
GPU: ?
PSU: Seasonic or Coolermaster?
Case: Antec 302?
OS: Windows 7, 64-bit

Do Mushkin make great SSD's and RAM? What size wattage PSU would you recommend? I'm still trying to figure out if the Intel HD4000 integrated graphics will work fine for me or if I will need a discrete GPU like say for example an NVidia 650?
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January 27, 2012 2:31:59 PM

double post
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January 27, 2012 8:05:25 PM

Maybe Crucial would be a better choice for an SSD?

I was just looking at Newegg and noticed this Asus mobo:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

"ASUS SSD Caching 3X faster performance at a click. SSD Caching from ASUS is easier than ever. At 3X faster, this feature boosts system performance by using an installed SSD with no capacity limitations as a cache for frequently accessed data. Harness a combination of SSD-like performance and response and hard drive capacity with just one click, no rebooting needed and instant activation for complete ease of use, and even prevent data loss with included backup functionality."

http://usa.asus.com/Motherboards/Intel_Socket_2011/P9X7...

I assume they will come out with a new board for the Ivy Bridge when it finally comes out, right?

It's probably overkill for what I need since I'm not a gamer and will never overclock anything since I want a very long lifespan. All I ever see is stuff for gamers. Where do I go to find stuff that meets my needs for my business/work without all the over kill features that I don't need and will never use?
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February 12, 2012 3:47:48 PM

Update: I've been saving up so, it looks like I may actually have closer to $1,800 to spend.

If I go with Intel's Ivy Bridge CPU and an NVidia 650 at around 120 watts what wattage power supply would be just right?

CPU: Ivy Bridge

GPU: NVidia 650

MB:

SSD: 64g Crucial M4
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Best SSDs For The Money: January 2012
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/m4-ssd-capacity-com...

RAM: 16g Crucial DDR3 1600
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

PSU: Antec 520W
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...



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February 16, 2012 4:11:07 PM

bang for buck

intel i5 2400 or i7 2500
asus h61 mobo (as it has quick sync which would help tremendously for video editing and as u are not overclocking)

asus gtx 560 ti dcu ii
256 gb samsung 830 ssd
4x4 gb vengence ram
cm haf 912
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February 16, 2012 4:20:20 PM

bang for buck

intel i5 2400 or i7 2500
asus h61 mobo (as it has quick sync which would help tremendously for video editing and as u are not overclocking)

asus gtx 560 ti dcu ii
256 gb samsung 830 ssd
4x4 gb vengence ram
cm haf 912
corsair 650 w 80+ psu

more performance

i7 3930k
asus sabertooth x79 or the mobo u chosen before
cm hyper 212+ or evo
cm haf x or cm storm trooper
and rest is same.
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February 20, 2012 3:24:31 PM

I was under the impression the new Ivy Bridge coming out in April (desktop) was on the 2011 socket; is that a mistake? I've never had Intel before so I sure do get confused with all those different sockets. Do different sockets matter much with performance?

I'm waiting for Ivy Bridge so do I need to go with a z77 mobo with socket 1155 then? Or, will there be a new mobo out to go with the new release of Ivy Bridge?

Since all I've ever had has been AMD, what all do I need to know about Intel that will be better or be worse just so I'm fully informed of what I'm getting into by going with Intel this time?

I understand that there's been a delay with mass release of IB but, that's just the laptop/mobile sector, right? I've read a few articles on this delay and it's still not exactly clear if IB desktops will be out in April or not and for what price.
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February 22, 2012 4:12:05 PM

I'm curious, when will the newer motherboards stop including the soon to be obsolete USB 2.0 and PCIe 2.0 and go with all gen 3? I don't even want a mobo with USB 2.0 and PCIe 2.0.

I'm just waiting for Ivy Bridge to come out and I'm considering going with a Gigabyte motherboard. I use most of these nearly everyday for work:

Adobe CS (I'll get the new CS 6 when it comes out soon), Office, Word, Photo Shop, XSite Pro (for building our own websites). I also create our own powerpoint lectures, and now we have to create/render our own HD videos. A bit of music, 3D graphics and 3D web design, Skype, watching movies, occasional minor online gaming.

Would you recommend the Z77 or the X79? Or will there be a new mobo out in the next month or two?

I was considering going with a GIGABYTE mobo z77 but, I don't even see one available here ... what's up with that?

GIGABYTE
http://www.gigabyte.com/products/main.aspx?s=42
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February 23, 2012 9:10:13 AM

its going to take time ib to come to shelfs

till then i would recomend ether to wait or take

ive bridge is not going to be a major change at the most 20 percent
if u are going to buy now then heres a build

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February 23, 2012 10:08:20 AM

would post every component tommorow have a*hectic day

better go with i7 2600 or i7 3820
ive bridge is not a big upgrade
go for x79 has quad channel 40 pci lanes flagship could upgrade to 6core extreme edition and easy overclocking without or voiding warrante

if u are waiting for ib then wait for kepler and will decrease prices down:) 
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February 23, 2012 4:38:31 PM

From what you have now, a $1500 budget will be a massive upgrade.

You would do well with sandy bridge now, but, unless your need is urgent, I would wait for ivy bridge. Last I heard, April 8 is launch and availability date.
The new cpu's will be priced in the same ranges as current sandy bridge offerings. But, because of 22nm vs 32nm construction, they will be 10% faster per clock, and will run cooler.

In the mean time continue your research and perhaps do some shopping for components that will not change.

Here are some of my thoughts:

1) Motherboard size: How many expansion slots do you really need? A full ATX motherboard has 7. A Micro-ATX has 4 and a mini-ITX has one.
All will have a pci-e x16 slot for a discrete graphics card. No doubt, we will see a full gamut of cases launched with ivy bridge.

2) I do not see a need for a discrete graphics card. A discrete graphics card is needed for fast action gaming. The current sandy bridge integrated graphics is fine for Playing HD video, and other normal work. It will be about the equivalent of a $50 discrete graphics card, and suitable for casual gaming.
Only for fast action racing sims or shooters would a discrete card be appropriate.

More importantly, the current integrated graphics will support two 1920 x 1600 monitors. A second monitor is one of the most productive options for any type of work.
Ivy bridge will improve on the integrated graphics in speed, greater number of monitors, and higher resolutions.

3) You can shop for a quiet case now. A good resource for this is www.silentpcreview.com For quiet, you want larger, slower turning fans in your case.
If you go for a full ATX motherboard, look at the Antec solo2.
I use a Silverstone TJ-08E m-atx case. It's 180mm intake fan is very quiet, offering plenty of cooling.
Both cases have washable intake air filters

4) You really don't need more than the stock cooler that comes with the cpu. But I would get one anyway. It need not be expensive, $30 buys you a cm hyper212 or Xigmatek gaia. Their slow turning 120mm fans will keep your cpu quieter and cooler under load.

5) 64 bit enabled editing apps can make great use of ram to avoid work file i/o. Sandy bridge,(and presumably ivy bridge) is insensitive to ram speeds. Since ram is so cheap, I would consider a 16gb kit of ddr3-1333 or 1600. Today, 4gb sticks are 2/3 the price of 8gb sticks, but that is changing. If you want more that 16gb, you will need windows 7 pro or ultimate, and plan on using 8gb sticks. Defer on the ram, since it is getting cheaper, and you will want to check on motherboard compatibility.

6) Get a SSD for the os and some apps. A SSD is 50x faster in random i/o than the fastest hard drive. That is what the os does mostly. It is also 2-3x faster in sequential i/o. If you can afford the capacity to hold all your normally used work files, that is the way to go. Otherwise use a hard drive for storage and overflow. 60gb is enough for the os and a few apps. 120gb is probably much better. Today, I would not buy anything but intel or samsung for reliability. Defer a SSD purchase, since prices are still coming down.

7) ivy bridge is compatible with the current sandy bridge. So, expect that the motherboards will be similar. Since you will not need a discrete graphics card, pci-e 3.0 or whatever is irrelevant. Even with the single fastest discrete card available today, there is no meaningfull difference in fps between pci-e 2.0 and 3.0.

8) You can shop for a psu today. Without a discrete graphics card, you will only need about 300w. It turns out that stronger 400-500w psu's do not cost any more. Whatever, buy a quality psu. My short list of quality psu's would include Seasonic, Antec, Corsair, PC P&C, and XFX. If you buy a gold rated psu, it will cost a bit more, but the fan will hardly run, and it will be exceptionally quiet.
Here is an example: of a seasonic 560w unit:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
The unit is strong enough to power a discrete graphics card as strong as a GTX570 or 7970.
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February 23, 2012 5:20:50 PM

for a 1800$ system, if you can add another 100 or 200$ go for sandy bridge-E

i7 3839K system, (with that you can even have x2 gtx570) but since its for work you wouldn't need that, just any cheap gpu is good enough, the RAM you will need, just grab a corsair vengeance/g.skill ripjaws Z, for 32gb (8X4GB) then a corsair h100 for cooling, a asus mobo if not msi mobo x79a-gd45 (or the small ones) depends on what you like if not get the gd65(8D) then some nice SSD but not really needed so you can just go for a HDD, and you will have more to spare then a 750W seasonic psu (just in case you want to upgrade and add a lot of other stuff and if by some reason you happen to get into gaming or what not then its good) for GPU you can also choose cheap ones or get a gtx560ti with your budget, no need for holding back get what you can and go extreme ^_^
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February 23, 2012 7:34:05 PM

Big thanks, geofelt!

I'm still learning but, folks here at Tom's have been a huge help. My selection of hardware is nearly complete.

I'm definitely going to wait for Ivy Bridge and the z77. I'll wait for a few reviews too. I'm stoked over the 22nm resulting in lower TDP and lower heat plus an increase in performance and the PCIe 3.0, all for a fair price.

1. I will only need about 3 expansion slots 4 at most.

2. I'm hoping the HD 4000 will be just fine for me for now until GPU prices on the 6xx and 7xxx come down. I wonder how the HD 4000 compares to the MSI RS480M with the onboard ATI Radeon Xpress 200 Series I've been using, just for fun?

3. I have my eye on the new Antec 302 case:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

4. I will keep those CPU coolers in mind.

5. I definitely wanted DDR3 1600 ram. If I can get a good deal I'll go with 16g instead of 8g.

6. I plan on getting a 120g SSD for OS & programs. To save money I'll have to use my 500g HD for now too, at least until prices come down more. I had been considering an Intel SSD for reliability.

7. Makes sense.

8. Well, I'm glad you brought that up because I'm still struggling with my decision on a PSU. I can get by on the HD 4000 for now but, I don't want to screw myself down the road if I decide to get a decent GPU. I definitely don't want to have to buy a new PSU just so I can add a GPU - which is pretty much what happened with my current system w/ a 250w PSU. I was considering at least 400w up to about 550w. That 560 PSU sure would be nice if I decided to get a nice GPU. I had been thinking about an NVidia 650 or a 7890 down the road when prices come way down.

My local computer shop recommends Cooler Master due to their own experience with low return/issue rate:

Cooler Master GX-550W
http://www.coolermaster.com/product.php?product_id=6641

COOLER M GX 450W
http://www.coolermaster-usa.com/category.php?category_b...

Is Cooler Master a wise choice for PSU's?
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February 23, 2012 8:32:30 PM

2. When sandy bridge was announced, I remember the graphics capability as being comparable to a $50 discrete graphics card. The HD4000 is supposed to be considerably better.

5. Sandy bridge(and presumably ivy bridge) is insensitive to ram speeds. More is better than faster.
http://www.anandtech.com/show/4503/sandy-bridge-memory-...
Also, 1.5v ram does not really need any heat spreaders.

6. I agree with Intel for reliability. With the introduction of the 520 series, the 510 and 320 series may start to see some good rebates. I recently bought a 80gb 320 for $80 after rebate. For random i/o, which is what the os does mostly, the 320/510/520 will perform equally in a normal desktop environment. Also check out Samsung 830 which also seems to be quite reliable.

8. There are lots of 500-650w psu's in the $65-$90 range. From what I can tell, coolermaster has been mixed, depending on the particular model. Personally, I would go with the best I can find. jonnyguru is one of the most respected test and review sites, do some research there.
It is not wrong to overprovision your psu a bit so that under maximum load, the fan will not spin up and become noisy.
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February 23, 2012 11:17:05 PM

serialkiller said:
would post every component tommorow have a*hectic day

better go with i7 2600 or i7 3820
ive bridge is not a big upgrade
go for x79 has quad channel 40 pci lanes flagship could upgrade to 6core extreme edition and easy overclocking without or voiding warrante

if u are waiting for ib then wait for kepler and will decrease prices down:) 


Ivy Bridge is a big update if you care about power efficiency, ram speed or graphics. I would recommend the I5-3750
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February 24, 2012 1:18:27 PM

geofelt, jonnyguru appears to be quite impressed with that PSU you recommended:

jonnyguru Reviews - Seasonic X-560 560W

For this new Ivy Bridge build, I refuse to put a cheap PSU in there. I'm going with a quality PSU this time for sure.

So, just to reiterate, it won't "hurt" anything in my new system if I have far more wattage from my PSU than I need? So, even if I put a 750w PSU in with a system that didn't require more than say about 400w, my other hardware would still be fine?
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February 24, 2012 2:31:52 PM

josejones said:
geofelt, jonnyguru appears to be quite impressed with that PSU you recommended:

jonnyguru Reviews - Seasonic X-560 560W

For this new Ivy Bridge build, I refuse to put a cheap PSU in there. I'm going with a quality PSU this time for sure.

So, just to reiterate, it won't "hurt" anything in my new system if I have far more wattage from my PSU than I need? So, even if I put a 750w PSU in with a system that didn't require more than say about 400w, my other hardware would still be fine?

yes, having more than enough wattage in the psu won't hurt anything, but having not enough possibly will
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February 24, 2012 2:32:16 PM

josejones said:
geofelt, jonnyguru appears to be quite impressed with that PSU you recommended:

jonnyguru Reviews - Seasonic X-560 560W

For this new Ivy Bridge build, I refuse to put a cheap PSU in there. I'm going with a quality PSU this time for sure.

So, just to reiterate, it won't "hurt" anything in my new system if I have far more wattage from my PSU than I need? So, even if I put a 750w PSU in with a system that didn't require more than say about 400w, my other hardware would still be fine?


A psu will draw only the wattage that is demanded of it, regardless of the maximum wattage rating.

If you care, a psu will operate most efficiently in the middle third of it's range.
That is why I suggest a bit of overprovisioning.

Also, a quality psu will be able to deliver it's advertised wattage continuously, not just at peak which cheap psu's advertised. In fact, a quality psu will often be able to deliver more than it's rated power if it needs to.

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February 24, 2012 3:00:19 PM

Thanks morgoth780

Excellent, because I'm really liking the quality of that Seasonic 560w PSU - I wonder if I can get it for under $99 without the high dollar velvet bag I will never use? I also like how the fan only spins when it needs to, which extends its lifespan. It's big though so I hope it will fit in the Antec 302 case I'm considering.

My only issues with the Antec 302 case would be not having a place for a couple SSD's in the bay area where I'd prefer them to be but, there are those two oddly placed spots so, I guess that'll have to do. Wish the case came with a fan in the front. Also, an all black interior and side window would've been an extra bonus. The price is right though so, can't really complain.

Here's a video review of that Antec 302 case: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ubX0pKrtZiI

geofelt, I do care about that "middle third of it's range" - ie the sweet spot. So, would I still be in the sweet spot if I did eventually get a GPU such as a NVidia 650 or AMD 7890? They're only around 120 watts. If so, I may go with your recommended PSU or an equivalent. I've gone through a few reviews of it and it's an all around kick-arse PSU, no doubt.
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February 24, 2012 3:14:12 PM

josejones said:
Thanks morgoth780

Excellent, because I'm really liking the quality of that Seasonic 560w PSU - I wonder if I can get it for under $99 without the high dollar velvet bag I will never use? I also like how the fan only spins when it needs to, which extends its lifespan. It's big though so I hope it will fit in the Antec 302 case I'm considering.

My only issues with the Antec 302 case would be not having a place for a couple SSD's in the bay area where I'd prefer them to be but, there are those two oddly placed spots so, I guess that'll have to do. Wish the case came with a fan in the front. Also, an all black interior and side window would've been an extra bonus. The price is right though so, can't really complain.

Here's a video review of that Antec 302 case: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ubX0pKrtZiI

geofelt, I do care about that "middle third of it's range" - ie the sweet spot. So, would I still be in the sweet spot if I did eventually get a GPU such as a NVidia 650 or AMD 7890? They're only around 120 watts. If so, I may go with your recommended PSU or an equivalent. I've gone through a few reviews of it and it's an all around kick-arse PSU, no doubt.


Who knows the specs of the nvidia 650, or 7890?
It is doubtful with 28nm construction that they would require more than two 8 pin pci-e connectors.
Still, if you want to plan on them, I would change the 560w unit to a X750 or X850 unit which is similar, but with more power reserve.

3.5" adapters will come with many ssd's, so you can mount them like a normal hard drive. Worst comes to worst, you can duct tape a ssd anywhere.

Defer your decision on front fans. It is easy to add them later if you need to. Normally, you need either front intake fans, or rear/top exhaust fans, but not both.
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February 24, 2012 11:08:05 PM

Is Platinum really worth spending the money on or is gold or bronze or silver good enough? Low energy consumption and efficiency is important to us but, within a reasonable cost.
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February 24, 2012 11:15:50 PM

josejones said:
Is Platinum really worth spending the money on or is gold or bronze or silver good enough? Low energy consumption and efficiency is important to us but, within a reasonable cost.


Worth is something that only YOU can assess.

From a monetary point of view, even with very high electricity rates, I doubt that you could ever pay off the price premium of gold, platinum or silver rating.

From a "save the planet" point of view, the differences are miniscule.

To me, the prospect of a quieter psu is the most important thing.

If you have the budget and don't mind spending it, why not splurge on a gold or platinum psu? At the very least, you will get a top quality psu.
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February 26, 2012 9:20:05 PM

Jose-
Here is my recommendation.
CPU- Intel I7-3820 $325 OR Ivy Bridge equivalent
GPU-Radeon 6850 $150 -MIR
Mobo- X79 mobo $350
OR Ivy Bridge/Z77 equivalent $250
RAM- Your preferred manufacturer, 16 gig of 1600 mhz. Could go 1333, but you want 1600, so that's your call. $115
SSD- 120 gig Crucial M4 $150 (almost as fast/reliable as Intel or Samsung's, way better than OCZ)
HDD- Whatever you want, 500 gig + 7200 RPM $150
PSU- That Seasonic looks fine. $130
Case- Any case up to $150- I have a few suggestions



$1,520 + shippping - any MIRs. That's a damn good build for what you're going to be doing. Could drop the GPU, and spend more on a bigger SSD, or whatever else, but the 6850 is waaaay better than even HD4000 graphics will be. You could also go for an I5-2500K and cheaper Z68 mobo, and be ready for Ivy Bridge under budget. If power efficiency is a big thing, the new Radeon 7750 is very power efficient for around $110, and slightly better performance than a Radeon 6770. You could also look at 'Professional' GPUs, ie Firepro or Quaddro, but those are generally less performance/$.
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February 27, 2012 2:42:24 PM

Here's where I'm at for now but, things could still change:

I'm definetely going with an Ivy Bridge CPU as it has around a 15% to 20% performance increase over SB, plus has several new features. I'm just trying to sus out which one at this point. I'm trying to decide between the 3770S or save about $100 by going with the 3475S. They are the same wattage so I'm unclear if I'd be better off with 4 threads or 8 as that seems to be one difference.

CPU: Ivy Bridge 3770S or 3475S

GPU: I may try the integrated HD4000; later get a 650 or 7890

MB: I'm leaning towards a Gigabyte z77 board but, not sure which one yet

SSD: I'm leaning towards a 120g by Intel

HD: I'll use my 1 year old 500g HD

RAM: haven't decided yet

PSU: haven't decided yet

Case: I'm leaning towards the Antec 302

Antec 302 at Newegg

Antec 302 video Review

OS: Windows 7, 64-bit

Any thoughts?
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February 27, 2012 2:44:51 PM

A commenter said (I'm not sure how to link to a direct post here):

Quote:
"The Intel HD 3000 is basically equal to the Radeon HD 5450.

If Anandtech's early estimate of a 60% increase in performance is correct, then the Intel HD 4000 should more or less be equal to the Radeon HD 5550 (which is faster than a Radeon HD 6450). To throw nVidia into the mix, that means the Intel HD 4000 would be around 10% - 15% slower than the GT 430. "


My question on page 54

Do I need a discrete GPU to do occasional video rendering or will the Ivy Bridge integrated graphics HD 4000 be okay? What or where is the line drawn that helps one decide if they really need a discrete GPU or not?
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February 27, 2012 3:41:03 PM

josejones said:
A commenter said (I'm not sure how to link to a direct post here):

Quote:
"The Intel HD 3000 is basically equal to the Radeon HD 5450.

If Anandtech's early estimate of a 60% increase in performance is correct, then the Intel HD 4000 should more or less be equal to the Radeon HD 5550 (which is faster than a Radeon HD 6450). To throw nVidia into the mix, that means the Intel HD 4000 would be around 10% - 15% slower than the GT 430. "


My question on page 54

Do I need a discrete GPU to do occasional video rendering or will the Ivy Bridge integrated graphics HD 4000 be okay? What or where is the line drawn that helps one decide if they really need a discrete GPU or not?

If your using Adobe then go with an Nvidia card. Seeing how your purchasing in April you will have the advantage of seeing the benchmarks (hopefully) of the new Nvidia Kepler PCI-E 3.0 graphics cards along with Ivy Bridge cpu's. Better yet the new 1155 Z77 boards should be out on the shelves by then and they are bad to the bone. April/May seems to be the sweet spot for doing a new build. New cpu's (Ivy Bridge), new Nvidia PCI-E 3.0 cards, and new 1155 Z77 boards with Thunderbolt.
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February 27, 2012 3:59:35 PM

I agree, Why_Me - I'm interested in CUDA by NVidia for HD video creation/rendering/ creating my own DVD's purposes. April/May certainly does appear to be a great time for a new build.

I wish Tom's (or some place) would do a type of Six $200-$260 LGA 2011 Motherboards, Reviewed and/or "Best mobo for the $," for the z77's. I'm leaning towards a Gigabyte z77 board but, not sure which one yet and I really haven't heard much about them.
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February 27, 2012 4:18:27 PM

josejones said:
I agree, Why_Me - I'm interested in CUDA by NVidia for HD video creation/rendering/ creating my own DVD's purposes. April/May certainly does appear to be a great time for a new build.

I wish Tom's (or some place) would do a type of Six $200-$260 LGA 2011 Motherboards, Reviewed and/or "Best mobo for the $," for the z77's. I'm leaning towards a Gigabyte z77 board but, not sure which one yet and I really haven't heard much about them.

They did do one some months ago.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/z68a-gd80-p8z68-del... <---- here's just one of a few reviews they have done on 1155 boards. The thing is that the 1155 Z77 boards are due out about the same time as Ivy Bridge and those boards have all the newest / latest gizmo's and goodies. Reviews on those boards will be done on here after they have been out for a few weeks / months.
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February 27, 2012 4:25:01 PM

Oh, that link is for Z68 Motherboards. I haven't really heard much at all about the z77's. I've heard plenty about the x79's on the 2011 socket, which are out of my price range and over-kill for my needs. It's getting pretty close so, I would think it's time for some z77 reviews and round-ups. It will be March in a few days. I'm going to have to wait for reviews so I can compare them to help me make a wise decision on which mobo to get.
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February 27, 2012 6:33:48 PM

The only thing I can find about the z77 boards mostly comes from that early January convention, which merely provides a few images and not much info.

More MSI Z77 motherboards get previewed
http://vr-zone.com/articles/more-msi-z77-motherboards-g...

Gigabyte Z77X-UD5H, Z77X-UD3H & B75M-D3H
http://www.legitreviews.com/article/1821/2/

I'm looking forward to some serious Gigabyte z77 reviews

I just ran across this latest news:

Quote:
Intel Ivy Bridge Revised Launch-Schedule Revealed

"Citing issues with the 22 nm manufacturing process, Intel postponed the release of its 22 nm "Ivy Bridge" Core processor family by as much as 10 weeks. There still seems to exist some confusion surrounding this launch, which SweClockers sought to clear with its latest article containing important dates related to the launch.

8 April, 2012: This was supposed to be the day "everything" (all CPU models slated for April, compatible motherboards) launched. Instead on this day, motherboard vendors will launch their products based on Intel Z77, Z75, H77, and B75 chipsets. System builders (you) will have to use existing "Sandy Bridge" processors, which are very much compatible with those motherboards. You will not be able to buy "Ivy Bridge" processors from anywhere on this day.

29 April, 2012: This is when Intel will launch quad-core Core i5, Core i7 "Ivy Bridge". On this day, the media will be able to post reviews of the new processor platform. It's not clear if you'll be able to buy these chips on this day, either. Perhaps you might.

3 June, 2012: This is when Intel will launch Q77 and Q75 chipset. The notebook platform based on "Ivy Bridge", dual-core "Ivy Bridge" processors, and the much talked about Ultrabook "Ivy Bridge" form-factor are due for "sometime in June". "

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February 27, 2012 6:48:12 PM

josejones said:
The only thing I can find about the z77 boards mostly comes from that early January convention, which merely provides a few images and not much info.

More MSI Z77 motherboards get previewed
http://vr-zone.com/articles/more-msi-z77-motherboards-g...

Gigabyte Z77X-UD5H, Z77X-UD3H & B75M-D3H
http://www.legitreviews.com/article/1821/2/

I'm looking forward to some serious Gigabyte z77 reviews

I just ran across this latest news:

Quote:
Intel Ivy Bridge Revised Launch-Schedule Revealed

"Citing issues with the 22 nm manufacturing process, Intel postponed the release of its 22 nm "Ivy Bridge" Core processor family by as much as 10 weeks. There still seems to exist some confusion surrounding this launch, which SweClockers sought to clear with its latest article containing important dates related to the launch.

8 April, 2012: This was supposed to be the day "everything" (all CPU models slated for April, compatible motherboards) launched. Instead on this day, motherboard vendors will launch their products based on Intel Z77, Z75, H77, and B75 chipsets. System builders (you) will have to use existing "Sandy Bridge" processors, which are very much compatible with those motherboards. You will not be able to buy "Ivy Bridge" processors from anywhere on this day.

29 April, 2012: This is when Intel will launch quad-core Core i5, Core i7 "Ivy Bridge". On this day, the media will be able to post reviews of the new processor platform. It's not clear if you'll be able to buy these chips on this day, either. Perhaps you might.

3 June, 2012: This is when Intel will launch Q77 and Q75 chipset. The notebook platform based on "Ivy Bridge", dual-core "Ivy Bridge" processors, and the much talked about Ultrabook "Ivy Bridge" form-factor are due for "sometime in June". "

That only affects laptop/note book users and people who purchase prebuilts. It's because they have too many SB notebook cpu's on hand atm that they want to get rid of (sell), and nothing to do with the manufacturing process. Intel has more on it on their website.
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February 27, 2012 7:40:11 PM


Here's the key part of that link...

Quote:
The Financial Times cites Maloney as saying that the start of sales of machines based on the 22nm Ivy Bridge has been pushed back. "I think maybe it’s June now," he's quoted as saying.


He's referring to laptops, notebooks, and prebuilts.
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February 27, 2012 7:52:20 PM

That's what I originally thought too and that's the news that came out last week after the original announcement was vague but, now it appears even Intel isn't sure. I hope they come out in early April but, I guess we won't know for sure until the launch.
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February 28, 2012 4:33:35 PM

Where is the very best place to purchase an Intel 520, 120G "Cherryville" from in order to get the best price? Is it Newegg or that ssdtracker website?

I have to play it safe and go with an Intel SSD for our small business. I'd rather get a cheaper one but, I can't afford to get cheap on reliability and lifespan.

I've never had an SSD before so, I'm curious about basic maintenance differences between HD's and SSD's. What all do I need to know before getting my first SSD? What do I need to know regarding basic maintenance like I used to perform with HD's such as defrag, clean and scan disk, virus scans etc? By having an SSD for my OS and programs only, while having a separate HD for documents etc, will that eliminate viruses from corrupting my OS and programs?

$225 Intel 520, 120G "Cherryville"
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

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February 29, 2012 6:41:55 PM

I posed the question below:

Quote:
"What's the real difference between the LGA 2011 socket for the x79's compared to the LGA 1155 socket for the z77's and the new Ivy Bridge? Is one of these sockets really better than the other?

The socket issue with Intel really confuses the hell out of me. That's one thing I really liked about AMD for keeping those AM2 and AM3 sockets. Wish Intel would do that. Does a different socket have anything to do with performance at all? If not, then, why does Intel insist on having so many different sockets?

How do I know if a z77 board will be fine for me or, if I need an x79?"

I thought ebalong, page 55, made a great response so I thought I'd quote it here for others
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/page-303971_28_2700.h...

Quote:
"Intel divides their processors into "Mainstream" and "Enthusiast". Mainstream, all the way from the lowly Celeron, to the "Mainstream Performance or Premium" 2600K is on 1155. 2011 is for the SB-E and IB-E processors which are subdivided further into "Extreme" and "non-Extreme". 2011 socket is "better" in the sense that it has nearly twice as many pins, supports a larger 6-core processor, 4-channel RAM, and some other goodies. Though, high-end chips for 1155 are more than enough for most people, hence the term "Enthusiast" to describe the 2011 socket. There may be value in the roughly $600 3930K (2011 socket) for people that multitask a lot, but it is questionable whether the pinnacle offering, the "Extreme" 3960X (also 2011 socket) is worth the $1,000 for not much more than pure bragging rights.

With 1155 and 2011, Intel continues with their "parallel" socket offerings that they began with the first gen i-series 1156/1366 sockets. I don't know how many other sockets were around during the 775 days....the upcoming Haswell will use 1150, and who knows what the Haswell-E will use....

People seem to perceive that AMD has some advantage with allowing backwards compatibility between some sockets, but it is not that much different than what Intel does when you really look at it. With Intel, a socket is around for roughly 2 generations of processors, or ~2 years. It looks like even some of the lower-end 1155 boards with the cheaper chipsets might even be able to support an Ivy Bridge chip with BIOS update. Despite AMD having their AM2-AM2+ compatibility (and so forth), it still depends upon the board. I haven't seen where you can take an AMD board that is about 2 years older or more, and have it support newer chips, despite socket compatibility. For example, I can't switch my Athlon 64 X2 6000+ out for even the lowliest of Phenom II's, despite the fact that AM2+ chips are supported by AM2 sockets, my board is too old. In this manner, AMD hasn't been much different than Intel, I really don't know why people insist on perpetuating this idea that AMD boards enable you to upgrade just the processor after more than ~2 years, there may be rare cases, but it doesn't seem to be the rule.

Research the difference between the Enthusiast line of Intel processors, and the Mainstream line; decide what you need, that will dictate what socket you go with. "

I think that for my needs, the z77 board and 1155 socket Ivy Bridge will be just fine for me and it'll be much cheaper as well.
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February 29, 2012 6:46:30 PM

Personally I would hold off to see what Ivy bridge MB pricing is like. If pricing is insane, you can always fall back on a z68 board and IB CPU.

For what your needs are, I don't think you need top end equipment. A mid-range MB, middle of the road IB/SB CPU should be plenty. I would focus my spending on a quality PSU, RAM, and an SSD for the best preformance gains.

When you say you want quite, do you really need silent, or just something that's noticably quieter than what you're currently using?

A respectable case which is good with noise levels and has decent airflow is the Cooler Master 690 II (692) and it's only $80
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Cases for most folks are more about looks, so I'm not sure what look excites you.

You should be able to pick up a decent 850W PSU for under $100 these days. The Corsair Enthusiast series comes to mind.

IB or SB you should be able to find a decent CPU/MB pairing for under $500. If you were buying today I would recommend an i5-2500. I'd have to wait and see the pricing on the IB parts when they come out. For a motherboard, since you're not overclocking, performance is going to be the same for almost all brands in the z68 platform. You stated you wanted PCIe 3, but realistically there won't be any devices out any time soon that will even support it. If you can get it for the same price as not having it, then fine, but I wouldn't let that be a deciding factor for you. You really want to focus on what features are important to you. Do you need lots of USB ports, lots of SATA connections? Maybe you could use built-in Wifi or bluetooth? Stop and think about what features would be beneficial for you, then narrow your choices down to MB's with those features. Things like 12-phase power are great, but if you're not overclocking your spending money on features you'll never use. Gigabyte, ASRock, and ASUS all make high quality boards, in every price range.

If you don't require any features, you can go with a board like the AsRock z68M, which has plenty of bells and whistles all for under $100.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
The AsRock Z68 pro3 ups the ante with PCIe 3 slots, and better components, and more features, while still hovering around the $100 price point.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Since you're not planning on Overclocking, value ram would be more than adaquate for your needs. By going with Value ram, you can save a few bucks and bump up to a nice 16GB kit. Mushkin, GSkill, and Corsair all carry value lines which offer outstanding performance for under $100.

Next I would go with a nice 120GB SSD. You want reliability, so this is where I would spend the cash. I'm a fan of the Corsair Force series, but Samsung makes a nice 128GB SSD too. You're probably looking at close to $200 for this component. You might be able to find a deal, or get something with a rebate to save a few bucks.

You'll probably want to add an extra HD to cover the limited storage from the SSD. You can pick up a Seagate Green drive for $100. It will be low power and pretty quite to boot.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Seriously, for what you need there's no reason you couldn't put together a very compelling PC for under $1200. I recently built an HTPC with similar requirements as you. I was able to do the entire thing for about $1000. It handles encoding tasks, surfing, basic office work, severs as a media center, and I even play classic games on it. Honestly if I had to do it again, I would have probably spent less money on the components.

Keep us posted as to how you make out.
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February 29, 2012 8:10:55 PM

I'm pretty much onboard with ya, mfarlow. I'll wait to see the prices on those z77's. I really, really want Ivy Bridge with the HD 4000 graphics since it's suppose to be better than the HD 3000 on Sandy Bridge. I'm hoping the HD 4000 might get me by until Christmas or so. Maybe I'll get a GPU then, we'll see.
Quote:
"When you say you want quite, do you really need silent, or just something that's noticably quieter than what you're currently using? "

Since our guy who used to make our product videos has died a few months ago, we need to start doing our own videos so, I need a silent system at least at around 30% load and below while recording, which takes very little, so we can record without computer sounds and interference going on in the background. Those Seasonic PSU's do that due to the hybrid fan system.

Quote:
"You stated you wanted PCIe 3, but realistically there won't be any devices out any time soon that will even support it."

Agreed. I just want all that bandwidth so it's there when it is out since I will keep this system until it dies. That's why I also want to get a quality mobo, PSU, CPU, SSD etc. within reasonable cost.

Quote:
"Do you need lots of USB ports, lots of SATA connections?"

I do need a minimum of 4 USB ports in the back plus two for the mouse & keyboard, preferably all USB 3. I also need two USB up front of the case along with headphone and mic jacks.

I've never used raid before or an SSD. I do have a SATA 500g HD now I'll use with this new system.

I doubt I will use Wifi or bluetooth. I don't have any of that right now.

So, I'm leaning towards:

CPU: Ivy Bridge 3770S or 3475S

GPU: integrated HD4000 in Ivy Bridge; later maybe get a 650 or 7890

MB: Gigabyte z77 probably a UD3 or UD5

SSD: 120g by Intel 520

HD: I'll use my 1 year old 500g HD

Case: I'm leaning towards the Antec 302

OS: Windows 7, 64-bit

RAM: haven't decided yet

PSU: haven't decided yet
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March 2, 2012 3:48:33 PM

josejones said:
Here are the only z77 boards I can find right now:

ASUS P8Z77-V Deluxe

ASRock Z77 Fatal1ty Professional-M

In another month or two your going to see a bunch of z77 boards. Those Fatal1ty boards are awesome boards but I was never big on that color scheme. It hurts the eyes.
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