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Ivy vs Sandy (Bridge)

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May 6, 2012 4:20:07 PM

Hello,
Building a PC for the first time.
From what I gather the Ivy bridge is supposed to be better but runs hotter than the sandy bridge.

Is the performance a significant bump up? and what measures should i take in addition to a standard cooling fan? anything I should be aware of to combat the possible overheating?
thanks

More about : ivy sandy bridge

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May 6, 2012 4:28:02 PM

Pretty much a wash. Ivy probably won't overclock as well as Sandy due to heat. But Ivy has (very) slightly higher performance at a given clock speed. If you want to overclock, either the Noctua nh-d14 or Corsair H100 are good options.

If I were buying now, I'd get Ivy simply because it is the current generation and uses marginally less power.
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May 6, 2012 4:37:36 PM

Thanks for the response!
This is the CPU ive been looking at. Ill mainly be using this build for gaming. This processor looks like a promising one and the price seems great.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
-Intel Core i7-3770 Ivy Bridge 3.4GHz (3.9GHz Turbo) LGA 1155 77W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 4000 BX80637I73770

Can you (or someone) provide some details on what exactly are the differences between the different socket types?
From what I understand the LGA2011 is a newer technology and can support more power. more memory channels (quad channel) and more cores.

Im not very hardware-savy so this is a learning experience. But its fun trying to navigate through all the details to get the best rig possible haha (for my budget $1000)
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May 6, 2012 5:04:51 PM

lga 1155 is sandy bridge/ivy bridge

lga2011 is high end sandybridge/ivybridge
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a b à CPUs
May 6, 2012 6:22:28 PM

LGA 2011 is the highest-end socket. It's for the Sandy Bridge-E processors, which are essentially server processors. They come in 38xx numbers.

LGA 1155 is the mainstream socket. It's for the Sandy/Ivy Bridge processors. They come in variants below 2700/3770 numbers.

The K after the numbers denote unlocked multiplier. If you want to overclock your processor, the only way is to get the models with K.

So in this example, the i7-3770 that you chose is:
i7: Brand
3xxx: Ivy Bridge
3770: Highest-end Ivy Bridge

For a budget of $1000, the i7-3770 might be too expensive and overkill. A 3570K will probably do.
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a c 138 à CPUs
May 6, 2012 6:57:44 PM

eddieroolz said:
For a budget of $1000, the i7-3770 might be too expensive and overkill. A 3570K will probably do.

You can cram an i7 in a sub-$1000 build if you pick components for function over form and dial down graphics one notch such as going 7770 instead of 7870. For people who need the CPU power for productivity more than they need graphics for gaming, this can be the better trade-off.
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May 6, 2012 7:49:43 PM

Thank you guys for the advice. really helps.

Yeah looks like my budget will have to be increased. I will be using this mainly for gaming and some productivity.

I think Im going go for the i7 3770/k/s. the price point $300-$340 doesnt seem too bad either. would these be the best options?
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May 6, 2012 8:12:56 PM

It's really a fictitious piece of market segmentation by Intel for the purposes of creaming more money off people who think of themselves as "high end" users. The so-called "benefits" of LGA2011 are quad channel RAM and higher PCI express bandwidth. But neither of these is of any relevance unless you're running a server with an 8 Core Xeon.

There is one reason (and only one IMHO) to get LGA2011 if you're a home user. That's if you want to get a hex core CPU like the 3830K or 3860X. This is only relevant if you're running workstation style applications (like 3D modelling, simulations and rendering) that require a lot of parallel processing power. Irrelevant for gaming and general use.

So for the vast majority of people, 1155 is the way to go. A couple of points about your proposed CPU choice. First of all, I believe there is little point in getting the non-K 3770. This only has limited overclockability compared with the K version but a broadly similar price. Second point: since it's a gaming build, you probably don't need the i7. The only real benefit of the i7 compared with the i5 is hyperthreading, which is relevant for some applications like video editing, but of no benefit for gaming or productivity. Therefore, I'd recommend you consider the i5 3570K. This is a fair bit cheaper and in games/productivity, has no disadvantage compared with the i7.

(A side note, why do I keep getting the message "sorry this forum is not available?")
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May 6, 2012 8:13:06 PM

InvalidError said:
You can cram an i7 in a sub-$1000 build if you pick components for function over form and dial down graphics one notch such as going 7770 instead of 7870. For people who need the CPU power for productivity more than they need graphics for gaming, this can be the better trade-off.


Very true. My reasoning was that I didn't want him to overspend on CPU and skimp on other parts.

InvalidError said:
You can cram an i7 in a sub-$1000 build if you pick components for function over form and dial down graphics one notch such as going 7770 instead of 7870. For people who need the CPU power for productivity more than they need graphics for gaming, this can be the better trade-off.


DeltaMikeOscar said:
I think Im going go for the i7 3770/k/s. the price point $300-$340 doesnt seem too bad either. would these be the best options?


If you're set on a 3770K, then great, it should serve you very well for gaming and productivity for years.
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May 6, 2012 9:41:29 PM

First of All thanks again to everyone who responded. lots of good advice without using the whole "google/wikipedia is your best friends" actual concrete answer so much appreciated ;) 

doing some further reading I think Ive narrowed down my specs for the cpu, ram and board.

i5 -3570k (confirmed with bwrlane. dont need the i7...mainly will be used for gaming and programming. minor image/video editing. essentially just Photo shop)

ASRock Z77 Extreme6 LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard (seems like a good price not the cheapest but by no means most expensive. seems to have everything i need. hdmi/sata/4 memory slots
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

CORSAIR Vengeance 16GB (4 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
(plenty of ram. more than i need. 95 bucks not too bad)

my case - not too sure what i really need when it comes down to it.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

thoughts?




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May 6, 2012 9:58:13 PM

DeltaMikeOscar said:
First of All thanks again to everyone who responded. lots of good advice without using the whole "google/wikipedia is your best friends" actual concrete answer so much appreciated ;) 

doing some further reading I think Ive narrowed down my specs for the cpu, ram and board.

i5 -3570k (confirmed with bwrlane. dont need the i7...mainly will be used for gaming and programming. minor image/video editing. essentially just Photo shop)

ASRock Z77 Extreme6 LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard (seems like a good price not the cheapest but by no means most expensive. seems to have everything i need. hdmi/sata/4 memory slots
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

CORSAIR Vengeance 16GB (4 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
(plenty of ram. more than i need. 95 bucks not too bad)

my case - not too sure what i really need when it comes down to it.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

thoughts?


Nice system. Just want to mention that video editing is just the kind of thing that an i7 excels at. You will get about a 20% performance boost vs i5. Obviously your choice whether it's worth the budget. No difference in games.
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May 7, 2012 2:46:46 PM

bwrlane said:
Nice system. Just want to mention that video editing is just the kind of thing that an i7 excels at. You will get about a 20% performance boost vs i5. Obviously your choice whether it's worth the budget. No difference in games.



the performence boost isnt really worth it


if he feels he needs more then he can quite easilly overclock the core i5


convert a full length film a an i5 2400 only takes about 20mins or so


thats a 2 hour film, he wouldnt really notice the differnce between the core i7/i5 except the bigger hole it burns in his pocket



you are forgetting as well that it would be more beneficial to get better gpu because you can boost the speed of video conversion by using the gpu as well


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May 7, 2012 3:50:17 PM

shanky887614 said:
the performence boost isnt really worth it


if he feels he needs more then he can quite easilly overclock the core i5


convert a full length film a an i5 2400 only takes about 20mins or so


thats a 2 hour film, he wouldnt really notice the differnce between the core i7/i5 except the bigger hole it burns in his pocket



you are forgetting as well that it would be more beneficial to get better gpu because you can boost the speed of video conversion by using the gpu as well


Entirely depends on how much video editing the user is doing. If you're an enthusiast and work with premiere pro or Vegas, the boost is tangible. Don't forget that real time editing with a 24Mbps stream in adobe premiere pro with several layers of effects requires a heck of a lot of CPU power and there's nothing worse than having to pre-render your workflow just to be able to edit in real time.  For my money, i7 xxxxk is minimum. For OP it depends entirely on priorities and budget whether it is worth it.

I didn't forget that GPU can help with video rendering. But I have strong reservations on this, based on experience. The codec settings to get it to work are very specific, it is crash prone, the output quality is highly suspect and glitch prone. Personal opinion: Far more trouble than it's worth
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May 7, 2012 3:56:29 PM

bwrlane said:
Entirely depends on how much video editing the user is doing. If you're an enthusiast and work with premiere pro or Vegas, the boost is tangible. Don't forget that real time editing with a 24Mbps stream in adobe premiere pro with several layers of effects requires a heck of a lot of CPU power and there's nothing worse than having to pre-render your workflow just to be able to edit in real time.  For my money, i7 xxxxk is minimum. For OP it depends entirely on priorities and budget whether it is worth it.

I didn't forget that GPU can help with video rendering. But I have strong reservations on this, based on experience. The codec settings to get it to work are very specific, it is crash prone, the output quality is highly suspect and glitch prone. Personal opinion: Far more trouble than it's worth


point taken, its not very efficent


but the point i was trying to make it is.

its simply not worth getting an i7 if you only do a little bit of video/photo editing


if he was a professional then it would be differnet because for a start he would be looking at lga2011 and would probably get a cpu with more than 4 cores
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May 7, 2012 4:25:51 PM

shanky887614 said:


its simply not worth getting an i7 if you only do a little bit of video/photo editing



Yep, agreed.
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May 7, 2012 4:40:12 PM

DeltaMikeOscar said:
CORSAIR Vengeance 16GB (4 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
(plenty of ram. more than i need. 95 bucks not too bad)



Be careful with the Corsair Vengeance memory; most of it is 2" (including the stuff that you selected). The problem with this is that most of the 3rd party coolers will seat over the first memory slots around 1.8" off the board. Which means that you wont be able to get your 3rd party HSF (heatsink/fan) mounted if you are using the normal Corsair Vengeance memory. Use the Corsair Vengeance Low Profile memory or some G. Skill Ares memory.


Christian Wood
Intel Enthusiast Team
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May 7, 2012 8:53:15 PM

im afraid i already bought the parts. could this be resolved by just buying a bigger case so theres more room? Sounds like that wouldnt be possible, I may have to return the memory if thats the case :( 
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May 7, 2012 9:01:53 PM

DeltaMikeOscar said:
im afraid i already bought the parts. could this be resolved by just buying a bigger case so theres more room? Sounds like that wouldnt be possible, I may have to return the memory if thats the case :( 


Usually, it's only the fan that hangs over the RAM slots, so if you get something that only has a single fan (Hyper 212+/Evo for instance), you can just switch the side that the fan is on. That's not a guarantee though, since on smaller mobos, the RAM slots may be closer to the socket, but I think you'll be fine with the mobo you selected.

One thing I should mention is that that assumes you position it parallel to the RAM slots, and not perpendicular. If perpendicular, then you will definitely need low profile RAM, but there's no difference in how it performs, no matter how it's positioned.
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