Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

CPU Cooling Suggestions

Last response: in CPUs
Share
May 6, 2012 9:53:32 PM

Hello,

I recently bought a bundle through Intel and got the Intel® Desktop Board DP67BG Extreme and an Intel i7-2700k processor.

I checked intel's site and the chip's max temperature is like 74.6 or something along those lines.

While playing EVE Online my CPU temp hits between 65-68 degrees and holds.

I am using the stock CPU heatsink and fan that came with, no over clocking.

Any suggestions for a better heatsink? The problem I see is the memory is extremely close to the CPU making larger heatsinks a problem (unless the cooling fins are positioned above the memory)
a b à CPUs
May 7, 2012 12:25:30 AM

Do you have low profile memory? If you have low profile memory, you should be fine with big heatsinks too. :)  I would suggest a CM Hyper 212+. Many people like them a lot because they are cheap and give pretty good results compared to other air coolers. You could always step up to water though, but that gets even more expensive. :??: 
m
0
l
a c 105 à CPUs
May 7, 2012 12:32:17 AM

another vote for the 212+, you can pick it up for $20 after MIR and it won't interfere with memory.
m
0
l
Related resources
May 7, 2012 5:54:58 PM

Thanks for the suggestions - where would be a decent place to pick one up?

This is the memory I am using:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

How much of a hassle is it for the after market heatsinks - it seems I'll have to remove my motherboard to get a new heatsink on - which is kind of annoying.

m
0
l
a b à CPUs
May 7, 2012 6:13:28 PM

It isn't that bad. You just remove the board once and then put in the new cooler. I would buy it from newegg. With the MIR it is $20 last time I checked. :) 
m
0
l
May 7, 2012 8:40:16 PM

It appears this one is similar and is currently on sale making it cheaper, suggestions?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

My only concern is the RAM would get in the way, I assume the fans are positioned facing the left side and right side of the case (So facing the memory and the back of the case, correct?) rather than up and down?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... is the one you all suggested, I wonder if I would have the same problem?

Does the RAM list its heigh and does the heatsink list its clearance?
m
0
l
a c 188 à CPUs
a b å Intel
May 7, 2012 9:26:53 PM

With the Cooler Master Hyper 212 +/Evo you are looking at the fan sitting around 1.8" over the board and first memory slot. The G. Skill memory that you are using is about 1.6" (if I am remembering right, I know it isnt a problem).


Christian Wood
Intel Enthusiast Team
m
0
l
a c 125 à CPUs
May 8, 2012 12:40:31 AM

sassums said:
How much of a hassle is it for the after market heatsinks - it seems I'll have to remove my motherboard to get a new heatsink on - which is kind of annoying.

Most newer gamer-oriented cases, even the budget ones, have motherboard cut-out to make the back-side of the socket area accessible without removing the motherboard.

I happen to have an original-version Antec 300 produced before they added the cut-out to it so I did have to pull my motherboard out to install my 212+ but after-the-fact and several months of use, the results thus far are well worth the one-time hassle.

If you think having to install a backplate is too bothersome, wait until you have to deal with failing/loosening push-pins with normal HSF that don't require backplates.

Between taking my PC apart to install the 212+ and the stock HSF jumping wildly from 1800RPM to 2700RPM with CPU temperature shooting beyond 70C at the slightest load change, I'd say taking apart my PC so I'll never have to worry about the stock HSF coming loose is the lesser of two evils by a wide margin... and it is a one-time process, which makes the choice a no-brainer.
m
0
l
May 8, 2012 4:23:35 AM

Also I am fairly nervous about removing the CPU chip itself and reapplying the thermal compound (Last time I paid some coworker to do it)

How do I wipe off the old compound?

Also how do I gauge how much to put on? Every heatsink I have put on my CPU's have already had the compound preapplied.

Do I spread it, or do I put like a raindrop (or however much is needed) on the CPU chip, and just press the heatsink down, allowing it to spread out the compound?
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
May 8, 2012 5:46:51 AM

Google around for it. I believe there is a solid guide here on toms in the sticky section as well. Get some rubbing alcohol highest percent you can get. Cheers and good luck.

If you can't find your answer, adding a eye drop worth of thermal paste at the center is a good start and then wiping a thin layer of thermal grease in the cracks of the 212+ contact point.
m
0
l
a c 125 à CPUs
May 8, 2012 6:03:30 AM

sassums said:
Also I am fairly nervous about removing the CPU chip itself and reapplying the thermal compound (Last time I paid some coworker to do it)

No need to remove the CPU if it bothers you that much, you can wipe it in-place. Simply use paper towels with some isopropyl alcohol, should get most pastes off without too much trouble.

As for how to apply, there are 4-5 different popular methods from single dot in the middle and squidgying a thin layer across the surface to fancy patterns. I personally use the "X" pattern: two thick lines about 2/3 of the way between opposite corners, the exact quantity is not too important unless you plan on major overclocking. Of course, you do not want the lines so thick that paste will overflow all around the heat-spreader.

As for your "overkill" choice, the 212 +/EVO are the two best HSF money can buy under $60, there is nothing else anywhere near as good around $30. Since the 212+ has gaps between the pipes and aluminum block, you might want to apply thermal paste to fill those gaps before installing the HSF... either that or be more generous with the amount of paste on the CPU.

If you aren't going to go with extreme overclocking (which you probably wouldn't do with an Intel board), you can also experiment with the amount of paste by successive iterations: put some amount of compound, attach, detach, look at coverage, squidgy to even out (or remove excess), add paste near the middle, re-attach, repeat until you are confident that you have adequate coverage on the current iteration. By adding paste to the middle, the new paste will fill most gaps from the detach and make the iterative re-installs nearly as good as getting the quantities and patterns right on the first try. If you want to do it "properly" afterward, keep tabs on how much paste you used and how in your iterative experiments, clean up and apply your empirically determined quantity.
m
0
l
May 8, 2012 6:52:51 AM

Thanks I appreciate all the help.

I am actually planning on upgrading the case (it was stupid of me to put new parts into an old case, like putting a new engine into an old car that can't handle it!)

And the new case has an open back on it so I could attach the new heatsink without taking the motherboard out (then again I am taking it out anyway) is it easier to attach the heatsink with the board out, or in a case where you access the back of it?
m
0
l
a c 125 à CPUs
May 8, 2012 12:22:52 PM

sassums said:
And the new case has an open back on it so I could attach the new heatsink without taking the motherboard out (then again I am taking it out anyway) is it easier to attach the heatsink with the board out, or in a case where you access the back of it?

Getting the screws in on the 212+/EVO can already be a little tricky in the open so if you're going to take the motherboard out anyway, I'd install it at that point instead of having to deal with case constraints. The cut-out is more of an after-the-fact convenience to spare people the trouble of taking their PC apart if they want to change their HSF at some future point.
m
0
l
May 9, 2012 4:11:14 PM

Okay thanks again! Im just nervous about the thermal paste and how to apply it. I don't want to not add enough to have the chip overheat, or put too much on
m
0
l
a c 125 à CPUs
May 9, 2012 5:18:09 PM

sassums said:
Okay thanks again! Im just nervous about the thermal paste and how to apply it. I don't want to not add enough to have the chip overheat, or put too much on

As I said previously, there are many "good" ways to apply paste. Some experimentation may be required to get it right.

With non-metallic paste, putting too much in doesn't hurt aside from messy socket clean-up if you ever need to remove the HSF afterward. Most of the excess will ooze out from under the HSF due to mounting force and you can accelerate that process by giving the 212 a few slight twists after installing to spread paste out.

Since you aren't going to be overclocking (much), getting the amount of paste exactly right is not going to be particularly important as long as there is at least enough to provide decent contact and you can also do successive iterations of mounting-removing the HSF and adding some paste in coverage-deficient areas until you are comfortable with what you see. This may introduce some small bubbles in the paste but coverage will still be more than adequate even for mild overclocking, the most important part is eliminating large no/dry-contact areas along the CPU core area.
m
0
l
May 9, 2012 5:44:00 PM

Thanks, once again I appreciate your help! I won't be overclocking it at all. I just want it to run cool while I am playing EVE.

The game, at max settings runs at 150FPS, the minute I log a second account in, and have it running in the background, the FPS drops to below 60.

I don't understand why, an i7-2700k, 16GB of DDR3 RAM, and an Nvidia 560ti should be more than enough to handle what is being thrown at it.
m
0
l
a c 125 à CPUs
May 9, 2012 6:17:45 PM

sassums said:
The game, at max settings runs at 150FPS, the minute I log a second account in, and have it running in the background, the FPS drops to below 60.

If the amount of GPU RAM in use by the two instances combined exceeds the amount of RAM available on the card, the drivers have to start swapping texture in/out of system RAM which is much slower and would easily explain the slowdown. Turning down AA, texture detail or some other memory hog option one notch or two might solve that.
m
0
l
!