Ivy Bridge LGA2011 Socket?

Hey guys.
I'm about to build a new computer, but with the recent launch of the new Ivy Bridge processors I'm considering waiting for a month or so before ordering the rig.

Seeing as the current Ivy Bridge has only been launched in LGA1155 flavors which only support 1x PCI-E 3.0 16x slot and not 2x (or 3x) I'm wondering if there is any word on when the LGA2011 Ivy Bridge processors are released? Google has not been very helpful in my quest thus far so any info would be helpful.
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More about bridge lga2011 socket
  1. 2nd or 3rd quarter 2013 is the current best guess for IB-E.
  2. What's the desire for PCIe 3.0? The only components around right now that could saturate the bandwidth of PCIe 2.0 (and therefore PCIe 3.0 being an improvement) are SSDs. So unless you have a specific need for PCIe 3.0, I'd not recommend sinking the extra cash into a S2011 board.
  3. The new nVidia cards, GTX 690 would benefit from PCIe 3.0? Or have I misunderstood that they just support PCIe 3.0, but doesn't utilize it fully?
  4. Intel CPU Roadmap: update
    Nothing showing up on the roadmap for an extreme version of Ivy Bridge through the 1st half of 2013
  5. WR2 said:
    Intel CPU Roadmap: update
    Nothing showing up on the roadmap for an extreme version of Ivy Bridge through the 1st half of 2013


    Thanks for the link WR2. I guess my option is either to go with Sandy or capitulate and go for Ivy and LGA1155.
  6. I wouldn't say choosing IVB is anything like capitulation.
    It's actually a very good choice.
    OK, SB is not a bad choice either but I'm not seeing any real limitation to going IVB.
  7. Ivy Bridge is only a disappointment if you plan on overclocking. I think 4.5GHz is generally the recommend max clockspeed due to heat. However, overclocking guides seems to say that Ivy Bridge CPUs are generally easier to overclock than Sandy Bridge CPUs (which were easy themselves). The highest OC I've read about is 5.0GHz on air. Then again, I have not been researching much on Ivy Bridge since I am more interested in Haswell which is coming next year.
  8. Here's an OC guide you might want to read. There are plenty out there.

    http://www.overclock.net/t/1247413/ivy-bridge-overclocking-guide-with-ln2-guide-at-the-end

    Also, I suppose people are a little disappointed that Ivy Bridge CPUs are not that much faster than Sandy Bridge CPUs. Then again, Intel has made no mention of any CPU performance boost over the previous generation.
  9. WR2 said:
    I wouldn't say choosing IVB is anything like capitulation.
    It's actually a very good choice.
    OK, SB is not a bad choice either but I'm not seeing any real limitation to going IVB.


    The only limitation I can see with IVB on LGA1155 is the limit of one full speed PCIe 3.0 lane. For SLI solutions, that's bad news. But then again, I guess I have to do some thought if I should go for SLI or opt for buying a new mobo+cpu next year again
  10. LostLogic said:
    For SLI solutions, that's bad news.
    It's not bad news at all. Not compared with PCI-e 2.0 CFX/SLI x8/x8 or x16/x16.
  11. LostLogic said:
    GTX 690 would benefit from PCIe 3.0?
    If you're talking about Quad SLI - now you can start making a case for X79 socket 2011.
  12. LGA 2011 IvyBridge-Enthusiast is said to take full advantage of the 22nm with 8-10 Cores @ 2.5-3.5GHz at most... The IvyBridge LGA 1155 is a huge disappointment because of the Thermal Compound they added into the Heat Spreader which sucks really bad, Voltage isn't a problem because who need 4.8GHz @ 1.3v when 1.1v is 4.5GHz already? 1.1v is great but 1.3v @ 4.8GHz isn't worth for the performance so best if you wait for IBE because it's worth it to wait for the 10 Cores...
  13. PCI Express 3.0 And What Of GK110?
    GeForce GTX 690 offers 8 GT/s signaling in both Sandy Bridge-E and Ivy Bridge-based platforms.
  14. If you want pcie 3.0 Z77 chipset supports its as well as usb 3.0,video boost,and Intel® Smart Response Technology.
  15. LostLogic said:
    Or have I misunderstood that they just support PCIe 3.0, but doesn't utilize it fully?

    For dual-SLI/Xfire, benchmarks only show 2-3% gain from going from PCIe2 to PCIe3, which means even 8xPCIe2 lanes per GPU is for most intents and purposes not a significant bottleneck yet. The extra FPS on PCIe3 are likely due to slightly lower latency, an intrinsic benefit of faster serial clock.
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