Hyper 212 Evo thermal paste application

Hello,

I'm getting ready to build a new computer and the only thing that I really am nervous about is installing the Hyper 212 EVO onto the CPU (i5 3570). I've read a lot about the best way to apply thermal paste but I wanted to pick the community's brain one more time to see if anyone has installed this specific cooler before.

I think I'm probably going to just do the small dot of paste on the center of the CPU and then apply the cooler, but I've heard others talk about adding a small amount of paste to the cooler first, or just applying the dot to the cooler. Anyone have any insight? Thanks!
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More about hyper thermal paste application
  1. I'm a little confused because the Arctic Silver 5 (which I plan on using) instructions state to apply the paste using the line method on the CPU. However, the Hyper 212 EVO instructions state to apply the paste uniformly across the cooler base itself (I'm a little worried about doing that in case I apply too much). But others have had success with the dot method.
  2. Hi :)

    You will get two answers to this....one you already know....then there is the PROPER way...

    My company has built high end gamers machines and servers for YEARS...

    SMALL PEA sized blob then spread it evenly (we use an old credit card)

    All the best Brett :)
  3. Brett928S2 said:
    Hi :)

    You will get two answers to this....one you already know....then there is the PROPER way...

    My company has built high end gamers machines and servers for YEARS...

    SMALL PEA sized blob then spread it evenly (we use an old credit card)

    All the best Brett :)


    You should remember to add that not all heatsinks use the same method.

    For example the Hyper 212+ was found to have thermal compound applied best by placing lines on the cracks between the pipes and the contact plate.

    Where as with the Hyper 212 EVO it has a flat contact plate so you can place a single rice grain/bb sized drop in the center of the cpu.

    With my Noctua NH-D14 I found best way was rice grain/bb in center but mine also has a flat contact plate.

    One of the main reasons why the drop in the center is the norm is because most cpus are concaved on the top so you will have more of a gap (normally, this isn't always the case) in the center versus the sides of the cpu. This is why people suggest drop in the center so when you screw down the heatsink the paste can naturally spread outwards. Rice grain/bb are examples of the amount of application you apply to the cooler/cpu.
  4. Hi :)

    I have done it my way for well over 20 years.....on cpus you have never even seen lol....

    You carry on doing it your way, and me mine.....but I have NEVER blown a cpu in all that time from overheating...

    And concave Cpu`s...really lol... :)

    All the best Brett :)
  5. Brett928S2 said:
    Hi :)

    I have done it my way for well over 20 years.....on cpus you have never even seen lol....

    You carry on doing it your way, and me mine.....but I have NEVER blown a cpu in all that time from overheating...

    And concave Cpu`s...really lol... :)

    All the best Brett :)


    Okay, whatever you say boss man. I am just saying there is known ways to do it for certain coolers.

    Not like I was disagreeing with you anyways, since I did say that your method is the norm. So I don't see what you are getting at talking about you doing it your way and me doing it mine.. its the same way... The only thing I spoke of that was different than what you said was regarding to heatsinks like the Hyper 212+....

    I guess you have never heard of lapping, seeing how you lold at my comment about concaved cpus.
  6. i have built thousands of systems and i apply a small amount or a couple dabs and then spread it with a credit card. i do this on everything from laptop CPU/GPU to NB/SB, Xboxes, and many other heat sink applications. never had an issue and its always made this run cooler.
  7. I'm sure you've lapped many a cpu Brett, the center area almost never gets touched and usually its one of the corners is the problem area...so yes the heat spreaders are somewhat concave though you'd never see it otherwise.

    I apply TIM very simular to your method.
  8. Small pea sized dot for the paste that comes with the Hyper 212 EVO. You can either use a credit card to spread the paste around the middle of the processor until you get a thin layer, OR you can use the weight of the cooler, once it has been installed to spread the paste around (this will be automatic, as the weight of the cooler pushes the blob down into a thin layer).

    However, paste applications will depend on which paste you are using! For example, arctic silver 5 gives best performance when using a line method, however this doesn't mean the cooler master paste will give the best performance with a line method!
  9. Thanks for everyone's suggestions. I've thought about doing the line method with the arctic silver but I'm worried about putting too much with the line and having it spill out of the top and bottom of the CPU. I guess any of the methods can work well or not work well, depending on how you do it.
  10. If you look at my paste removal/installation guide that's about the amount you want to have.
  11. MX-4 and NT-H1 performs better, are easier to apply, and don't require 200hr cure times like the AS5.

    AS5 is good but is outdated compared to other easy to use/non conductive compounds.
  12. I just assembled my 3570K/Evo combo last week and followed AS5 instructions to tint both the cpu and the cooler then do the line method. Works like a champ.

    Idles with fan as low as it will go at 25-27C in a 70F house. Just scrapes 60C with all cores at 4.4GHz and stock voltage.
  13. DIdn't take 200hr for me.
  14. amuffin said:
    DIdn't take 200hr for me.


    Still, wouldn't you want the best performance w/ smallest down time?

    Which AS5 no longer offers lol.
  15. From Arctic's site:
    "Important Reminder:
    Due to the unique shape and sizes of the particles in Arctic Silver 5's conductive matrix, it will take a up to 200 hours and several thermal cycles to achieve maximum particle to particle thermal conduction and for the heatsink to CPU interface to reach maximum conductivity. (This period will be longer in a system without a fan on the heatsink or with a low speed fan on the heatsink.) On systems measuring actual internal core temperatures via the CPU's internal diode, the measured temperature will often drop 2C to 5C over this "break-in" period. This break-in will occur during the normal use of the computer as long as the computer is turned off from time to time and the interface is allowed to cool to room temperature. Once the break-in is complete, the computer can be left on if desired."

    Does it really matter? No.
  16. J_E_D_70 said:
    From Arctic's site:
    "Important Reminder:
    Due to the unique shape and sizes of the particles in Arctic Silver 5's conductive matrix, it will take a up to 200 hours and several thermal cycles to achieve maximum particle to particle thermal conduction and for the heatsink to CPU interface to reach maximum conductivity. (This period will be longer in a system without a fan on the heatsink or with a low speed fan on the heatsink.) On systems measuring actual internal core temperatures via the CPU's internal diode, the measured temperature will often drop 2C to 5C over this "break-in" period. This break-in will occur during the normal use of the computer as long as the computer is turned off from time to time and the interface is allowed to cool to room temperature. Once the break-in is complete, the computer can be left on if desired."

    Does it really matter? No.


    So basically the argument I am seeing is why bother for a compound that offers better cooling, when you can have AS5 and have 200hr down time to cure :)
  17. With my 3770K, EVO, Arctic Silver setup, did pea size on CPU, spread thin, apply heatsink, and got great temps while OC'd.
  18. What down time? I'm using it and there has been no down time and no problems with a stable overclock. 2-5C over the course of curing is irrelevant.

    Then again, if the products you mentioned perform better is absolute temps then by all means they are the way to go! :) Someone should have sold me on them two weeks ago ;p
  19. J_E_D_70 said:
    What down time? I'm using it and there has been no down time and no problems with a stable overclock. 2-5C over the course of curing is irrelevant.

    Then again, if the products you mentioned perform better is absolute temps then by all means they are the way to go! :) Someone should have sold me on them two weeks ago ;p


    By down time I mean less than stressful period on your system. Mainly because when I am going for max overclocks, 5C can make or break it so running prime95 or anything while the compound is still curing will produce incorrect results therefore I see it as down time till it has cured before I can continue my ocing journey.


    Right now you can pick up MX-4 or NT-H1 from newegg for about the same price as the AS5. Out of the 3 the Noctua compound is going to be the best stuff to use. I recieved some NT-H1 with my NH-D14 cooler and it really amazed me at how it beat down my AS5 compound. Sadly they only gave me some much with my cooler so when I ran out I had to go buy some MX-4 which is basically neck and neck with the NT-H1.


    All in all you can't go wrong with either of the compounds but for the smart buyer the NT-H1 and MX-3/MX-4 are better buys over the AS5 because of their improved cooling/no cure times.
  20. Thanks for the info! Will use that in the future. Sorry to have hijacked a thread.
  21. Thanks for the info as well. I've decided to go with the Arctic Cooling MX-4 now, and I'm wondering if there are any other specific tips for applying that thermal paste to the 212 EVO? A lot of people have talked about spreading it but I'm worried about getting any air bubbles when I apply the cooler and also maybe making the layer too thick or thin, so I might just do the line method or the (small) pea method on the CPU itself. Any thoughts?
  22. jtomsh said:
    Thanks for the info as well. I've decided to go with the Arctic Cooling MX-4 now, and I'm wondering if there are any other specific tips for applying that thermal paste to the 212 EVO? A lot of people have talked about spreading it but I'm worried about getting any air bubbles when I apply the cooler and also maybe making the layer too thick or thin, so I might just do the line method or the (small) pea method on the CPU itself. Any thoughts?


    Some people have been able to use a card without any problems but for the most part using a card to spread the compound is less effective as using a dot in the center. Mainly because when you spread the compound it can create unwanted air bubbles and it may or may not fill all of the gaps properly because of it being thinned out.

    I had some Coollaboratory that was suggested to spread on the cpu but that wasn't as effective as a dot in the center for my cooler (wouldn't even show any compound the center of the cooler after applying and screwing it down, only showed it on the sides.)
  23. Sorry I'm jumping in late to this thread. I'm still confused about tinting. It's finishing the process. Do you just clean off around the edges or actually wipe off most of the compound almost to the point of removing it all? this step (installing an aftermarket cooler) is the scariest part of my first buid to me.
  24. Anonymous said:
    Sorry I'm jumping in late to this thread. I'm still confused about tinting. It's finishing the process. Do you just clean off around the edges or actually wipe off most of the compound almost to the point of removing it all? this step (installing an aftermarket cooler) is the scariest part of my first buid to me.

    This video shows how thermal paste will spread using a piece of glass.
    ttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EyXLu1Ms-q4
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ffK7L0Qj13Q
  25. I by accident (had to reapply a few times, to get cooler lined up correctly in case) discovered what I think is the prefect method for the 212 evo.

    Since I had to reapply the paste 4 times (Was a pain keeping bottom plate lined up inside of case), I was able to see the results of each of my attempted methods, and, all of the gaps on the bottom of the 212 evo filled in with paste I couldn't (didn't try) remove.

    So, first I tried the "Dot method": When I removed, the area covered was a joke. Clearly, not the best method for this heatsink.

    Next I did the "2 line method": When I removed it looked better than the dot had, but, it still had some very obvious flaws, such as spots towards the top that both lines didn't connect.

    For my 3 attempt I went with a "X": Now I was getting somewhere, when I removed it, I could tell I hadn't applied enough, but, it clearly had the best coverage of the 3 methods I tried.

    The 4th and final time I used the "X" method again, but, this time I used more paste, from edge to edge (stopping about 1/8 - 1/4 inch from each corner). While installing, since I was doing it inside of my case, the cooler did slip around on the cpu, further spreading the paste. Secured it nice and tight.

    So, I personally suggest, fill in any gaps on the bottom of your "CM hyper 212 evo", then use the x method I mentioned above.

    After installation, getting it all up and running, I oc'ed my FX-8230 to 4.0 on stock voltage (could go more I'm sure on stock) and ran prime95 for 1 hour. My CPU temps maxed out at 37c, had to of done something right.

    *I have my evo setup for pushing towards the rear of the case. I liked the idea of pointing it towards the top of the case, but, that would suck in GPU heat, and be counterproductive IMO. Below I'll post some temps after Downloading, installing, and playing Diablo 3 for 2 hours, notice my CPU temps maxed at 35c, this is the highest my CPU temp has gone, other than while running prime95.

  26. From what I see on
    http://www.arcticsilver.com/methods.html

    The TIM application varies from CPU to CPU. Based on this fact I would assume application is more CPU dependent than TIM dependent. This is just theory-crafting based on the information given, I don't see any other conclusions to be reached.

    From what I gather from the AS/methods site, is that the size and shape of the CPU DIE underneath the heat spreader determines how you should apply TIM. Mobile CPUs for example are designed so that the entire heat spreader interfaces with the DIE, so you would use the spread method while on a desktop I7 you'd use the line/long grain method, making sure you had coverage above all 2-4 cores, while the older P4s had more square (as opposed to rectangular) DIEs, so the pea-size method is better.

    As for the actual paste, I'm planning to use Shin-Etsu MicroSI X23-7783D. The reason is it's expected to have a longer life than most any other high performance TIM. I don't want to have to do re-applications on my own PC, much less any PCs I need to service.

    Right now I'm trying to find out if tinting my Hyper 212 Evo is the way to go. Not 100% sure on this, but it sounds like "tinting" your heatsink is a wise move, although I think it depends on your situation.
  27. I have installed the Cooler Master 212 Hyper Evo on my 4670K CPU using the stock thermal paste. My MB is the Gigabyte Z87X-D3H and I have a light 4.2Ghz OC.

    I found that ambient temperature makes a very large difference in my CPU temp at load and idle using that Cooler. I used the rice size dot method when applying the paste and it worked great.

    When my room is 70F my 4670k will run at 48-52C under load. When idle it will run at about 29C.

    If I bring my room temperature to 78F my CPU will run at around 58-60C

    I use a Antec 900 with fans on mid setting besidesthe top fan, I run that at the low setting.

    I've found that no matter what Cooler I use the risesize dot is the best way to go. I don't spread it or anything. I let the heatsync pressure do the work.

    Tinting the heatsync isn't going to do much but I must say. The paste your going to use is what I'll be going with next time I clean my PC. As it's the best stuff you can get IMO. But the cooler master paste that comes with the Evo is much better then I thought it was going to be. It also gets good reviews.

    Good luck
  28. Geeze, I been putting a some pea size for years.....You all are making me question myself! NOOOOO
  29. cdb8457 said:
    Geeze, I been putting a some pea size for years.....You all are making me question myself! NOOOOO


    Just a small thin line that would be around the size of 3 rice grains long. Or the pea size dot.

    I've found that the very small line or a small dot that's no more then 3 grains of rice is the best overall amount of paste you want.

    The EVO 212 is built better as the heat pipes are at the same level so your not going to need anymore paste then a few gains of rice.

    After looking at mine after about 4 months of use and a OC of 4.4 Ghz. The smaller size works much better then the bigger pea size amount. Since you must remember this is only to fill in the un even and micro sized surface lines, ect that you can't even see with you're eyes.

    I've also noticed that if you use more you end up running hotter. Due to the extra paste not curing right so tiny air bubbles and other things like the heat pipes not making full contact.

    I've seen people use so much paste then not even have the thing mounted tight enough. So they start to see it oozing out then stop before they tighten it correctly, so it ends up moving all over the place and even becomes uneven due to the weight. And that can really mess it up and you run 80C rather then 60C so always go easy with the paste and make sure you take your time when you place it and screw one side a little then go to the other side a little. You keep doing that until it is not going to move.

    And since it uses a spring, you don't have to worry much at all about putting too much force. As the spring will not allow it to put to much pressure on your CPU.

    This is more for people that are not mechanically inclined. Or are new to all of this.

    I notice that my i5 4670k at 4.4Ghz is running hotter how that I picked up the last part of my build. The last main part anyway.

    I picked up a Asus PB278Q (2014/2015) I got it over the other few 2560x1440p monitor's out there due to it having the lowest input lag and pixel response time, along with no PWM Flicker. And the new AHVA panel. I've used the BenQ monitor with the AHVA panel and seen the potential it has.

    But the Asus PB278Q 2014 has faster input and response time that can best the fastest TN 60hz panels out there.

    27" IPS that plays like the fastest TN 60hz just sounded good to me. And I'm loving the monitor. But my CPU is working about 20% more then my old 1080p TN monitor. But I don't notice much more heat at all. But in BF4 my CPU runs up to 80% now. While before it would max at 60-70% so I'm not sure what will bottleneck this thing. The only time it's been even close is in ArcheAge massive PvP open world battles. And even then it was not maxed. But it had all the cores at about 80% for the whole battle.

    So I'm thinking about getting a second Gigabyte R9 290 but I've never had a dual card rig for more then a few months.


    If anything I think when the time is needed. I will just build a new rig.

    All I know is I'm getting the new LG curved Ultra Wide screen monitor once the price drops because that thing is just awesome.

    Then again I'm happy with my monitor so I'll wait for 144hz 30" curved monitors.

    I just had to bring it up due to the coolness of it.
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