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Baking Questions

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November 27, 2011 12:36:15 AM

I was planning to bake my GPU (8800 GTS) tomorrow. Just a few questions. First, should the side with the actual chip be facing up or down? Second, won't the solder release a crap ton of fumes when I do this? It doesn't seem safe to do in my kitchen, especially the place where I cook my food.

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a b U Graphics card
November 27, 2011 1:06:02 AM

what is it suppose to do?

never heard of baking a GPU only of frying a CPU
a b U Graphics card
November 27, 2011 1:11:42 AM

quote
*Note* This guide will not repair damage done by ESD, abuse, stupidity, water damage, or alien attack. It mainly can be used to fix cards that are experiencing artifacts due to cold soldier or cracked solder due to overheating

http://techreport.com/articles.x/13815/1


Well I have worked with solder alot
Electricians and HVAC solders mostly
I will tell you that a classroom of twenty people using acytelene torches
did give me a headache LOL
but some electronics solder will leave a smell
but just open a window and use a fan if possible

I have frozen hard drives in the freezer to get a last use out of them
but never heard of baking a GPU
could work
worth a try


Definitely a good thread
Thank you
:) 
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November 27, 2011 1:39:24 AM

I've been told GPU facing down, though you should have it standing off of the foil.

The fumes from solder will contain lead which is bad for you, but a bit of google searching suggests that the total amount of solder is so small that there's nothing to worry about.
November 27, 2011 1:44:50 AM

Emerald said:
what is it suppose to do?

never heard of baking a GPU only of frying a CPU


Sometimes older cards get artifacts due to cracking or unsettling solder. Solder melts at like 365 degrees so five minutes at 380 can sometimes seal up those cracks and reseat some things.

I've never done it and honestly it sounds kind of like "putting batteries in the freezer" to me, but there are plenty of success stories.
a b U Graphics card
November 27, 2011 2:10:47 AM

actually lowering the temperature of a battery reduces acidic wear on the positive and negative plates in a battery
and actually would want to use a chiller box not a freezer box
it will keep your batteries lasting longer
though most common alkaline batteries usually have about 2 year shelf life
so I know in my house with having a child that batteries never stay unused that long LOL
a b U Graphics card
November 27, 2011 2:45:13 AM

Basic Chem 101
reducing temperature slows down chemical reaction
batteries work because of the acidic chemical reaction on the postive and negative plate of dissimilar metals
a chiller box is usually set generally between 35F-45F
with that said
I dont refrigerate my batteries
there is a possilbility of condensation and erosion of battery

no need to do it also

Think it is kind of silly :) 

but of course we are on a thread talking about baking a GPU in a freakin oven arent we now?
November 27, 2011 2:47:25 AM

king smp said:
Basic Chem 101
reducing temperature slows down chemical reaction
batteries work because of the acidic chemical reaction on the postive and negative plate of dissimilar metals
a chiller box is usually set generally between 35F-45F
with that said
I dont refrigerate my batteries
there is a possilbility of condensation and erosion of battery

no need to do it also

Think it is kind of silly :) 

but of course we are on a thread talking about baking a GPU in a freakin oven arent we now?



Yeeeeeahhhhh. I just wanted to know now if it's safe or not to do this in my oven that I cook food in. Lead fumes would be released I'm guessing, so I don't know :/ 
November 27, 2011 3:01:48 AM

This is a crazy interesting thread for some reason, very cool imagery of a GPU inside an oven...

You should search for "Furby Torture" on YouTube for something similar (assuming things go horribly - awesomely? - wrong and need to vent your frustrations by watching some innocent furbies get F'ed up.
a b U Graphics card
November 27, 2011 3:08:33 AM

MutatedGamer said:
Yeeeeeahhhhh. I just wanted to know now if it's safe or not to do this in my oven that I cook food in. Lead fumes would be released I'm guessing, so I don't know :/ 



as another poster said the amount of lead would be very small
if you wanted to be on the safe side you could clean the oven with
an oven cleaner afterwards
use fume free
breathing in the oven cleaner could be worse than the lead from the solder :) 
a b U Graphics card
November 27, 2011 3:11:22 AM

And as a person who has frozen HDs in a freezer to recover data

I will say that in a dire situation of a card that doesnt work
especially if getting new card is not an easy option
then I would do it
card is dead anyway
if the diagnosis is bad solder joints
why not try it
November 27, 2011 4:54:40 AM

MutatedGamer said:
I was planning to bake my GPU (8800 GTS) tomorrow. Just a few questions. First, should the side with the actual chip be facing up or down? Second, won't the solder release a crap ton of fumes when I do this? It doesn't seem safe to do in my kitchen, especially the place where I cook my food.


Instead of doing a potentially dangerous experiment with your GPU, I have a better idea: buy a new one.

Your GPU is pushing 4 years old. It's time to upgrade man.
November 27, 2011 6:35:14 AM

MutatedGamer said:
I was planning to bake my GPU (8800 GTS) tomorrow. Just a few questions. First, should the side with the actual chip be facing up or down? Second, won't the solder release a crap ton of fumes when I do this? It doesn't seem safe to do in my kitchen, especially the place where I cook my food.



I have done it successfully with a 8800 GTX. You need to take the heatsink off and put it on a baking tray upside down (GPU chip facing down), I don't know if it matters, but it's the way I did it. You also need some spacers to raise it about 1/2 inch from the tray so that nothing touches it.
I used 195 degrees C for 8 minutes.
It's well worth a try; I have done it on several low-performance cards like 7500 GS, 8500 GT, etc. and it worked pretty much every time. Every one of those cards still works but I believe that it's not permanent. If the solder cracked once, it will happen again, unless you are running the card way cooler ...
November 27, 2011 6:46:29 AM

RaptorHunter said:
Instead of doing a potentially dangerous experiment with your GPU, I have a better idea: buy a new one.

Your GPU is pushing 4 years old. It's time to upgrade man.


You're right. However if he's just going to buy a new one anyway, why not try the "potentially dangerous experiment" first? It is an old card and if possible a new one is in order, but it's worth a try.
!