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Sensor Cleaning - What is good enough?

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Anonymous
May 17, 2005 8:05:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I don't want to get too anal about this, but here goes anyway!
For those that have ventured into cleaning their own sensors on their DSLR's
- how close to perfection do you get before you decide it is good enough?
The cleaning methods that I use include first, simply blowing air on the
sensor using a squeeze bulb blower. Second, for the the more difficult
situations I use Sensor Swabs. I have not tried the brush method described
here:
http://194.100.88.243/petteri/pont/How_to/a_Brush_Your_...
ensor.html
After cleaning, and then shooting pictures of a clear sky or a white foam
core board, I find that in Photoshop's 'fit on screen' mode I basically
don't see any noticeable spots. However, when viewed as 'actual pixels' I
do still see some spots. Also, if my test shots are done at f22 versus
something like f8 the spots (in actual pixel mode) are distinctly more
noticeable.
For those of you that do your own sensor cleaning, do you achieve perfection
and if not what do you consider good enough?
Chuck

More about : sensor cleaning good

Anonymous
May 17, 2005 8:05:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

A long handled eye-shadow sponge with a drop of Oil Film Remover. Best way I
have found is to begin from one end of the sensor. you scrub (with some
pressure) the entire sensor quickly working from one end to the other. You may
have to scrub the sensor several times to make it "PERFECT" Also you'll need a
bright light and magnify lenz to detect any left over residue
--
There are no words that can be heard unless someone listens....
Remove *flaps* to reply

"C Wright" <wright9_nojunk@nojunk_mac.com> wrote in message
news:BEAF8087.276ED%wright9_nojunk@nojunk_mac.com...
> I don't want to get too anal about this, but here goes anyway!
> For those that have ventured into cleaning their own sensors on their DSLR's
> - how close to perfection do you get before you decide it is good enough?
> The cleaning methods that I use include first, simply blowing air on the
> sensor using a squeeze bulb blower. Second, for the the more difficult
> situations I use Sensor Swabs. I have not tried the brush method described
> here:
> http://194.100.88.243/petteri/pont/How_to/a_Brush_Your_...
> ensor.html
> After cleaning, and then shooting pictures of a clear sky or a white foam
> core board, I find that in Photoshop's 'fit on screen' mode I basically
> don't see any noticeable spots. However, when viewed as 'actual pixels' I
> do still see some spots. Also, if my test shots are done at f22 versus
> something like f8 the spots (in actual pixel mode) are distinctly more
> noticeable.
> For those of you that do your own sensor cleaning, do you achieve perfection
> and if not what do you consider good enough?
> Chuck
>
Anonymous
May 17, 2005 8:05:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

C Wright wrote:

> I don't want to get too anal about this, but here goes anyway!
> For those that have ventured into cleaning their own sensors on their DSLR's
> - how close to perfection do you get before you decide it is good enough?

When I start seeing lots of dust in the sky when taking narrow aperture
shots (f/8 and higher) then I give my sensor a quick clean using a sensor
swab dampened with eclipse fluid.

The odd bit of dust is acceptable.. I can always clone out a few little of
specs.

FWIW, I've only cleaned my 10D sensor four times in the last 18 months.
Related resources
Anonymous
May 17, 2005 8:05:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"C Wright" <wright9_nojunk@nojunk_mac.com> wrote in message
news:BEAF8087.276ED%wright9_nojunk@nojunk_mac.com...
>I don't want to get too anal about this, but here goes anyway!
> For those that have ventured into cleaning their own sensors on their
> DSLR's
> - how close to perfection do you get before you decide it is good enough?
> The cleaning methods that I use include first, simply blowing air on the
> sensor using a squeeze bulb blower. Second, for the the more difficult
> situations I use Sensor Swabs. I have not tried the brush method
> described
> here:
> http://194.100.88.243/petteri/pont/How_to/a_Brush_Your_...
> ensor.html
> After cleaning, and then shooting pictures of a clear sky or a white foam
> core board, I find that in Photoshop's 'fit on screen' mode I basically
> don't see any noticeable spots. However, when viewed as 'actual pixels' I
> do still see some spots. Also, if my test shots are done at f22 versus
> something like f8 the spots (in actual pixel mode) are distinctly more
> noticeable.
> For those of you that do your own sensor cleaning, do you achieve
> perfection
> and if not what do you consider good enough?
> Chuck

I got mine perfect, but it took two tries to do it. I do the same thing you
do -- start with a blower and finish with a pec pad wrapped around a wand.
It's almost impossible to get the thing completely clean, so the word is you
just deal with real world images. If you notice something most spots are
pretty easy to get rid of with software, but in most cases the actual image
will hide or distort most spots -- unless you take a lot of pictures of the
sky at f22. :-)

If you look close you can usually see the spot on the sensor which helps a
lot when you try to get rid of it. Remember that it's in exactly the
opposite position that you see it in your test photos. Upper left = lower
right, for example. And if you don't blow out the cavity and the back of
the lens before you start cleaning you'll probably never get it completely
clean.
Anonymous
May 17, 2005 8:05:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>For those of you that do your own sensor cleaning, do you achieve
>perfection ...

No.

>... and if not what do you consider good enough?

If I can see spots at 25% then I always clean the sensor since this is
about the size I'll print at.

Bill
Anonymous
May 17, 2005 8:16:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

C Wright trolls:

> For those of you that do your own sensor cleaning, do you achieve
perfection
> and if not what do you consider good enough?

I start with red fuming nitric acid. That usually leaves some dust and
a small amount of residue. If this is objectionable, I use some
diethyl ether, a small amount of liquid oxygen and a propane powered
soldering iron. The spherical shockwave from the detonation sweeps the
sensor completely and utterly clean. Why settle for anything less?

Note that you may need to practice this technique a bit prior to using
it on your camera.
Anonymous
May 17, 2005 11:46:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

<eawckyegcy@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1116371776.059094.153770@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>C Wright trolls:
>
>> For those of you that do your own sensor cleaning, do you achieve
> perfection
>> and if not what do you consider good enough?
>
> I start with red fuming nitric acid. That usually leaves some dust and
> a small amount of residue. If this is objectionable, I use some
> diethyl ether, a small amount of liquid oxygen and a propane powered
> soldering iron. The spherical shockwave from the detonation sweeps the
> sensor completely and utterly clean. Why settle for anything less?

Naw, use a high-energy particle accelerator with heavy ion bombardment for
12.2 s and then sweep it with a 4.9 Tesla magnetic field and lastly rinse it
with single malt Scotch whiskey (and drink what is left over).
Anonymous
May 18, 2005 12:17:42 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

C Wright wrote:
> I have not tried the brush method described
> here:
>
http://194.100.88.243/petteri/pont/How_to/a_Brush_Your_...
> ensor.html

I've been using the brush method the last few months, and have not had
to do a 'wet' cleaning in that interval. Picked up a set of inexpensive
brushes on eBay (ones without 'sizing' - do an eBay search on 'sensor
brush'), and am a very happy camper. Keeping the mirror box area clean
seems to reduce the frequency of sensor cleaningsrequired, too.

I have been able to achieve 'no visible dust bunnies' nirvana with just
a couple of swipes, every time. Someday I may need to use my
swab/PecPads/Eclipse combo for a really stubborn bunny, but I haven't
had to since I started brushing regularly (maybe I should floss, too ;) 
).

RM
Anonymous
May 18, 2005 3:19:53 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I keep taking shots with the daytime sky as a background. Birds and
cactus blooms. Dust spots really show up, but so far the blower
technique has worked. The new hasn't worn off my camera enough for me
to want to mess with it yet.
Anonymous
May 18, 2005 5:11:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

C Wright wrote:
>I don't want to get too anal about this, but here goes anyway!
> For those that have ventured into cleaning their own sensors on their
> DSLR's - how close to perfection do you get before you decide it is
> good enough?

Mine is good enough as long as I don't see any undesirable results on my
final product. So far I have not had to do any cleaning.

--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
Anonymous
May 18, 2005 7:20:31 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 5/17/05 6:16 PM, in article
1116371776.059094.153770@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com,
"eawckyegcy@yahoo.com" <eawckyegcy@yahoo.com> wrote:


>
>> For those of you that do your own sensor cleaning, do you achieve
> perfection
>> and if not what do you consider good enough?
>
> I start with red fuming nitric acid. That usually leaves some dust and
> a small amount of residue. If this is objectionable, I use some
> diethyl ether, a small amount of liquid oxygen and a propane powered
> soldering iron. The spherical shockwave from the detonation sweeps the
> sensor completely and utterly clean. Why settle for anything less?
>
> Note that you may need to practice this technique a bit prior to using
> it on your camera.
>
Great idea, send me your camera and I'll practice on it ;) 
Anonymous
May 18, 2005 12:02:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Backbone wrote:

> A long handled eye-shadow sponge with a drop of Oil Film Remover. Best way I
> have found is to begin from one end of the sensor. you scrub (with some
> pressure) the entire sensor quickly working from one end to the other. You may
> have to scrub the sensor several times to make it "PERFECT" Also you'll need a
> bright light and magnify lenz to detect any left over residue


That's a new one. I also heard of using scotch tape to peel off the dust.

--
Paul Furman
http://www.edgehill.net/1
san francisco native plants
Anonymous
May 18, 2005 12:39:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Had a hell of a time getting a piece of gook off the cmos sensor of my Canon EOS
1D Mark II ended up using a Q-Tip, with a drop of "Delta 1 OFR" comes in a spray
bottle!.I sprayed into a cup, and dropped one drop onto a Q-tip. I used gloves
and carefully rolled (to remove fuzz) Q-tip between my fingers. Opened the
shutter, and from one end of the sensor I (as instructed by a canon
tech guy) swabbed the entire cmos with a slight pressure and then back again
until all the liquid evaporated. Had to do it several times until I got it
perfect! everything works great. it's been 5 days since I cleansed for the 3rd
time using an new eye-shadow sponge - works better than the Q-Tip and safer as
well i.e. no fuz!

BTW scotch tape would for sure damage the sensor - I take it your joking?

There are no words that can be heard unless someone listens....
Remove *flaps* to reply

"Paul Furman" <paul-@-edgehill.net> wrote in message
news:n-idnT8zOJC9xBbfRVn-1A@speakeasy.net...
> Backbone wrote:
>
> > A long handled eye-shadow sponge with a drop of Oil Film Remover. Best way I
> > have found is to begin from one end of the sensor. you scrub (with some
> > pressure) the entire sensor quickly working from one end to the other. You
may
> > have to scrub the sensor several times to make it "PERFECT" Also you'll need
a
> > bright light and magnify lenz to detect any left over residue
>
>
> That's a new one. I also heard of using scotch tape to peel off the dust.
>
> --
> Paul Furman
> http://www.edgehill.net/1
> san francisco native plants
Anonymous
May 18, 2005 10:34:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Keith wrote:
> rainmen1956@yahoo.com <rainmen1956@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> > C Wright wrote:
> > > I have not tried the brush method described
> > > here:
> > >
> >
http://194.100.88.243/petteri/pont/How_to/a_Brush_Your_...
> > > ensor.html
> >
> > I've been using the brush method the last few months, and have not
had
> > to do a 'wet' cleaning in that interval. Picked up a set of
inexpensive
> > brushes on eBay (ones without 'sizing' - do an eBay search on
'sensor
> > brush'), and am a very happy camper. Keeping the mirror box area
clean
> > seems to reduce the frequency of sensor cleaningsrequired, too.
> >
> > I have been able to achieve 'no visible dust bunnies' nirvana with
just
> > a couple of swipes, every time. Someday I may need to use my
> > swab/PecPads/Eclipse combo for a really stubborn bunny, but I
haven't
> > had to since I started brushing regularly (maybe I should floss,
too ;) 
> > ).
> >
> > RM
>
>
> my Oly DSLR cleans the sensor for me every time I switch it on -
works
> really well to date ;-)


But I'd rather spend a couple of minutes brushing the sensor clean on
my D70 once every month or two than wait 2 seconds for an Oly camera to
power up every time I turn it on ;) .

RM
May 19, 2005 12:42:31 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Wed, 18 May 2005 08:02:54 -0700
In message <n-idnT8zOJC9xBbfRVn-1A@speakeasy.net>
Paul Furman <paul-@-edgehill.net> wrote:

> Backbone wrote:
>
> > A long handled eye-shadow sponge with a drop of Oil Film Remover.
> > <snip>

NO! Don't do that! Please don't feed the troll!

> That's a new one.

Sponge Bob Square Sensor ;^)

> I also heard of using scotch tape to peel off the dust.

That only works on Scottish Sensors (TM)

Jeff
Anonymous
May 19, 2005 12:42:32 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Your calling me a troll - because I added my own experience!
You don't like me, so kill file me - what's the problem?
plz stop following me around Mr. Confused....
--
There are no words that can be heard unless someone listens....
Remove *flaps* to reply

"Confused" <somebody@someplace.somenet> wrote in message
news:5v9n8158j1nekf0v23if3lv6eaj55k5t83@4ax.com...
> On Wed, 18 May 2005 08:02:54 -0700
> In message <n-idnT8zOJC9xBbfRVn-1A@speakeasy.net>
> Paul Furman <paul-@-edgehill.net> wrote:
>
> > Backbone wrote:
> >
> > > A long handled eye-shadow sponge with a drop of Oil Film Remover.
> > > <snip>
>
> NO! Don't do that! Please don't feed the troll!
>
> > That's a new one.
>
> Sponge Bob Square Sensor ;^)
>
> > I also heard of using scotch tape to peel off the dust.
>
> That only works on Scottish Sensors (TM)
>
> Jeff
May 19, 2005 3:19:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

rainmen1956@yahoo.com <rainmen1956@yahoo.com> wrote:

> C Wright wrote:
> > I have not tried the brush method described
> > here:
> >
> http://194.100.88.243/petteri/pont/How_to/a_Brush_Your_...
> > ensor.html
>
> I've been using the brush method the last few months, and have not had
> to do a 'wet' cleaning in that interval. Picked up a set of inexpensive
> brushes on eBay (ones without 'sizing' - do an eBay search on 'sensor
> brush'), and am a very happy camper. Keeping the mirror box area clean
> seems to reduce the frequency of sensor cleaningsrequired, too.
>
> I have been able to achieve 'no visible dust bunnies' nirvana with just
> a couple of swipes, every time. Someday I may need to use my
> swab/PecPads/Eclipse combo for a really stubborn bunny, but I haven't
> had to since I started brushing regularly (maybe I should floss, too ;) 
> ).
>
> RM


my Oly DSLR cleans the sensor for me every time I switch it on - works
really well to date ;-)
Anonymous
May 19, 2005 3:19:02 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Keith" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:1gws603.1jvnrudfm436qN%nospam@nospam.com...
>
> my Oly DSLR cleans the sensor for me every time I switch it on - works
> really well to date ;-)

Braggard! :)  This is a feature I hop to see other manufacturers adopt.
BTW, there is some type of flypaper-like material that the dust adheres to
after it is shaken from the sensor. How often does that have to be changed,
yearly, every two-years, etc.?
Anonymous
May 19, 2005 4:39:19 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Paul Furman <paul-@-edgehill.net> wrote:

> Backbone wrote:
>
>> A long handled eye-shadow sponge with a drop of Oil Film Remover.
>> Best way I have found is to begin from one end of the sensor. you
>> scrub (with some pressure) the entire sensor quickly working from one
>> end to the other. You may have to scrub the sensor several times to
>> make it "PERFECT" Also you'll need a bright light and magnify lenz to
>> detect any left over residue
>
>
> That's a new one. I also heard of using scotch tape to peel off the
> dust.
>

Only use Scotch 811 tape. It uses sticky polymers rather than adhesives.

Years agom I used to maintain RCA TK45 and TK46 TV studio cameras. They
had a dichroic prism assembly that would cost about $40,000 to replace.
Unfortunately, it lived near the high voltage ends of the camera tubes
and collected all sorts of dust, grunge and smoke as a result.
Traditionally, you would clean these with 50% distilled H20 and 50% 99.9%
isopropyl. I found that Scotch drafting tape presented a lower risk of
scratching and never left any residue. It even pulled off accumulated
cigarette smoke tar without damaging the dichroic layer. I've also used
this to clean my 13" reflector telescope's primary mirror (spot cleaning,
anyway). Scotch 811 is way better than the drafting tape, IMO.
Anonymous
May 19, 2005 4:45:06 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

nospam@nospam.com (Keith) wrote:


> my Oly DSLR cleans the sensor for me every time I switch it on - works
> really well to date ;-)
>

Yeah, but your pictures are noisy and your camera looks funny <g>.
May 19, 2005 12:40:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Paul Furman <paul-@-edgehill.net> wrote:

>
>That's a new one. I also heard of using scotch tape to peel off the dust.

I wonder what the sticky edge of a sticky note would do?

Wes

--
Reply to:
Whiskey Echo Sierra Sierra AT Alpha Charlie Echo Golf Romeo Oscar Paul dot Charlie Charlie
Lycos address is a spam trap.
May 19, 2005 1:14:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Peter A. Stavrakoglou <ntotrr@optonline.net> wrote:

> "Keith" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
> news:1gws603.1jvnrudfm436qN%nospam@nospam.com...
> >
> > my Oly DSLR cleans the sensor for me every time I switch it on - works
> > really well to date ;-)
>
> Braggard! :)  This is a feature I hop to see other manufacturers adopt.
> BTW, there is some type of flypaper-like material that the dust adheres to
> after it is shaken from the sensor. How often does that have to be changed,
> yearly, every two-years, etc.?

Good point - I have no idea! But I'd hazard a guess it might become an
issue in the future, though if the amounts of actual dust are low then
it might take a few years to 'fill up'.
Anonymous
May 19, 2005 10:41:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Keith" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:1gwsxlg.zddjie1t1gvooN%nospam@nospam.com...
> Peter A. Stavrakoglou <ntotrr@optonline.net> wrote:
>
>> "Keith" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
>> news:1gws603.1jvnrudfm436qN%nospam@nospam.com...
>> >
>> > my Oly DSLR cleans the sensor for me every time I switch it on - works
>> > really well to date ;-)
>>
>> Braggard! :)  This is a feature I hop to see other manufacturers adopt.
>> BTW, there is some type of flypaper-like material that the dust adheres
>> to
>> after it is shaken from the sensor. How often does that have to be
>> changed,
>> yearly, every two-years, etc.?
>
> Good point - I have no idea! But I'd hazard a guess it might become an
> issue in the future, though if the amounts of actual dust are low then
> it might take a few years to 'fill up'.

I'm sure that it will have to be eventually replaced but it sure beats
cleaning a sensor.
Anonymous
May 19, 2005 11:41:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 18 May 2005 18:34:04 -0700, rainmen1956@yahoo.com wrote:

> But I'd rather spend a couple of minutes brushing the sensor clean on
> my D70 once every month or two than wait 2 seconds for an Oly camera to
> power up every time I turn it on ;) .

Too bad the Oly doesn't have a setup option to choose between:

1. Disable auto-clean.
2. Auto-clean at power-on.
3. Auto-clean at power-off.
4. Auto-clean at power-on only if lens is pointed towards ground.
5. Auto-clean after power-on only after first ## minutes of
inactivity.
Anonymous
May 20, 2005 8:28:49 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

clutch@lycos.com wrote:

> Paul Furman <paul-@-edgehill.net> wrote:
>
>>
>>That's a new one. I also heard of using scotch tape to peel off the dust.
>
> I wonder what the sticky edge of a sticky note would do?
>
> Wes
>

Sticky notes use the same sticky polymer as Scotch 811 tape but there isn't
a wide enough strip on a sticky note to do much good.
May 20, 2005 3:13:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Bubbabob <rnorton@_remove_this_thuntek.net> wrote:

>clutch@lycos.com wrote:
>
>> Paul Furman <paul-@-edgehill.net> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>That's a new one. I also heard of using scotch tape to peel off the dust.
>>
>> I wonder what the sticky edge of a sticky note would do?
>>
>> Wes
>>
>
>Sticky notes use the same sticky polymer as Scotch 811 tape but there isn't
>a wide enough strip on a sticky note to do much good.

Multiple passes?

Curious, a Canon XT350 is budgeted for next year ( or maybe the XT500
;)  )

Wes

--
Reply to:
Whiskey Echo Sierra Sierra AT Alpha Charlie Echo Golf Romeo Oscar Paul dot Charlie Charlie
Lycos address is a spam trap.
Anonymous
May 21, 2005 3:37:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Bubbabob <rnorton@_remove_this_thuntek.net> wrote:

>Sticky notes use the same sticky polymer as Scotch 811 tape but there isn't
>a wide enough strip on a sticky note to do much good.

Plus, it leaves goo behind...

I thought if this, and did a test. I cleaned one of my glass filters
very well, then applied the cut edge if a sticky note. It looked
clean after removal, but then I dusted it with a bit of copier toner,
and the area that was covered by the sticky strip definitely grabbed
more toner dust than the cleaned areas.

To reply, please remove one letter from each side of "@"
Spammers are VERMIN. Please kill them all.
Anonymous
May 21, 2005 6:28:07 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Bubbabob wrote:
> Doug Warner <dwarner22@ccharter.net> wrote:
>
> > Bubbabob <rnorton@_remove_this_thuntek.net> wrote:
> >
> >>Sticky notes use the same sticky polymer as Scotch 811 tape but
there
> > isn't
> >>a wide enough strip on a sticky note to do much good.
> >
> > Plus, it leaves goo behind...
> >
> > I thought if this, and did a test. I cleaned one of my glass
filters
> > very well, then applied the cut edge if a sticky note. It looked
> > clean after removal, but then I dusted it with a bit of copier
toner,
> > and the area that was covered by the sticky strip definitely
grabbed
> > more toner dust than the cleaned areas.
> >
> >
>
> I have cleaned a number of filters and lenses very successfully with
811
> tape. Today I tried using it on the sensor. The results were bloody
awful
> and required 10 pec-pads to clean up after. I don't understand this
as it
> didn't leave a trace of residue on the filters or lenses. Perhaps the

> tape was contaminated at the factory but not thoughout its entire
length.
> This seems likely as the mark it left on the sensor did not cover the

> entire area that the tape touched. At any rate, I strongly recommend
> against it now.
>
> In regards to your experience with the sticky notes, have you
considered
> that there would be a temporary static buildup on any area the the
tape
> was pulled off of?

You guys have got better nerves than I have. I don't want to spend
either the time or money repairing or replacing the filter/sensor would
require, so I stick to two methods: a static charged brush (I charge a
make up brush by blowing canned air through the BRUSH); Pec swabs and
liquid for those times when the dust doesn't come off with brushing. So
far, in something like seven months, two brushings, one Pec cleaning
(Pecking?), and that's for someone using the camera mostly in heavily
dust laden environments.
Anonymous
May 21, 2005 8:49:32 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Doug Warner <dwarner22@ccharter.net> wrote:

> Bubbabob <rnorton@_remove_this_thuntek.net> wrote:
>
>>Sticky notes use the same sticky polymer as Scotch 811 tape but there
> isn't
>>a wide enough strip on a sticky note to do much good.
>
> Plus, it leaves goo behind...
>
> I thought if this, and did a test. I cleaned one of my glass filters
> very well, then applied the cut edge if a sticky note. It looked
> clean after removal, but then I dusted it with a bit of copier toner,
> and the area that was covered by the sticky strip definitely grabbed
> more toner dust than the cleaned areas.
>
>

I have cleaned a number of filters and lenses very successfully with 811
tape. Today I tried using it on the sensor. The results were bloody awful
and required 10 pec-pads to clean up after. I don't understand this as it
didn't leave a trace of residue on the filters or lenses. Perhaps the
tape was contaminated at the factory but not thoughout its entire length.
This seems likely as the mark it left on the sensor did not cover the
entire area that the tape touched. At any rate, I strongly recommend
against it now.

In regards to your experience with the sticky notes, have you considered
that there would be a temporary static buildup on any area the the tape
was pulled off of?
Anonymous
May 22, 2005 8:33:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

clutch@lycos.com wrote:
> "Charlie Self" <charliediy@aol.com> wrote:
> [snip]
>
> >You guys have got better nerves than I have.
>
> [snip]
>
> My nerves are fairly steady up to the time I figure wtf is going on
> and it is downhill from there....
>
> Wrote any new books lately?
>

Knowing what is going on is hard on the nerves. I often wonder what the
reality TV generation is going to do in real life.

Newest book just came out last week: Woodworker's Pocket Reference,
from Fox Chapel Publishing, ISBN 1-56523-239-9.
May 22, 2005 9:39:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Charlie Self" <charliediy@aol.com> wrote:
[snip]

>You guys have got better nerves than I have.

[snip]

My nerves are fairly steady up to the time I figure wtf is going on
and it is downhill from there....

Wrote any new books lately?

Wes


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