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Brand new i5-3570k running hot

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May 13, 2012 3:46:14 PM

So, I just finished my build and it's looking good, except for the CPU temperature. I know Ivy Bridge CPUs are supposed to run a little hotter than a Sandy Bridge, but not this hot. Brand new, using the stock fan, I started it up and the BIOS reads it at 96 degrees Celcius. I loaded up Windows and ran a temp tool and, sure enough, all the cores are running anywhere from 96-102 without any load.

That is crazy! I figured the stock fan would work fine for now, as I haven't overclocked it or anything! Would purchasing a new fan/heatsink fix the issue, or do you think I have something else faulty at this point? What do you suggest?

I am afraid to even use it until I get this matter figured out. Thanks.
May 13, 2012 3:49:15 PM

What kind of thermal paste are you using? Was there even a pad that was on the bottom of the stock cooler?
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
May 13, 2012 3:50:47 PM

reinstall the fan to start with.
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a b à CPUs
May 13, 2012 3:54:13 PM

is that Celsius or Fahrenheit? if it's C, then you have serious issues, if its F then it's normal and what my 2500K is running right now.
a c 101 à CPUs
May 13, 2012 4:27:33 PM

If the core hits nearly 100C and the heatsink remains merely lukewarm, your heatsink is not seated properly for some reason. Something might be wedged somewhere and preventing the contact surface from lying flat on the CPU, might be wedged elsewhere and preventing the push-pins/frame from applying sufficient pressure, etc.

Remove the HSF, make sure the heatsink is freely sitting on the stoppers around the fan frame, double-check that there is no debris or any other sort of obstructions on the board, push-pin mechanism, fan frame, etc. add a little bit of thermal paste or clean+re-apply, re-install.

The push-pin HSFs are infamous for turning out to be incorrectly installed even when they seem visually and mechanically properly attached because a few things can go wrong without necessarily being easily verifiable. Over the past week, there has been something like 20 threads about people seeing unexpectedly high core temps with their stock Intel HSFs, it is a very common problem.
a b à CPUs
May 13, 2012 4:31:36 PM

Isaac_thegamer said:
So, I just finished my build and it's looking good, except for the CPU temperature. I know Ivy Bridge CPUs are supposed to run a little hotter than a Sandy Bridge, but not this hot. Brand new, using the stock fan, I started it up and the BIOS reads it at 96 degrees Celcius. I loaded up Windows and ran a temp tool and, sure enough, all the cores are running anywhere from 96-102 without any load.

That is crazy! I figured the stock fan would work fine for now, as I haven't overclocked it or anything! Would purchasing a new fan/heatsink fix the issue, or do you think I have something else faulty at this point? What do you suggest?

I am afraid to even use it until I get this matter figured out. Thanks.


As others pointed out, if this is C, sorry that your CPU is being fried. It is normal if that is an F.

Get an aftermarket cooler; Noctual NH-D14 or Corsair H100 or Cooler Master H612.

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a b à CPUs
May 13, 2012 4:49:16 PM
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InvalidError said:

Remove the HSF, make sure the heatsink is freely sitting on the stoppers around the fan frame, double-check that there is no debris or any other sort of obstructions on the board, push-pin mechanism, fan frame, etc. add a little bit of thermal paste or clean+re-apply, re-install.

The push-pin HSFs are infamous for turning out to be incorrectly installed even when they seem visually and mechanically properly attached because a few things can go wrong without necessarily being easily verifiable. Over the past week, there has been something like 20 threads about people seeing unexpectedly high core temps with their stock Intel HSFs, it is a very common problem.


I can attest to the Push Pins sucking, my old E2160 suffered 90c temps due to just what you described, I glanced in my window and saw my HSF visibly LOOSE even though it wasn't when I closed up my case. Taking the motherboard back out and applying a healthy amount of pressure(after resetting the push-pins) to assure they went all the way in fixed it.

As to adding TIM to what's on it...I would not recommend that at all! Clean it with 90% Rubbing Alcohol and apply new TIM. Arctic Silver 5, can be bought at radio shack so you don't have to wait.

As SSri points out, and aftermarket cooler will help as well.
a c 101 à CPUs
May 13, 2012 6:12:24 PM

cliffro said:
As to adding TIM to what's on it...I would not recommend that at all!

For people who are not into overclocking (much), going completely straight from clean is rarely necessary. Just need to be careful not to introduce excess avoidable contaminants. This trick probably only works with non-curing pastes such as the mystery goo that comes with the 212+.

When I switched my 212+ from horizontal to vertical on a whim, I simply scraped the paste with a plastic card, put it back in the middle of the CPU, re-applied the HSF and slightly wiggled/twisted it along the contact plane to help re-spread the paste and cut bubbles. My load CPU temps were 53-57C before and are ~50C now despite warmer weather, which was an unexpected improvement. Could I have gotten even better results from starting over from a clean slate? Probably. But at 50C load temp and no intention of overclocking, I'm not going to bother since I am already so far below thermal limits.

The process is quite forgiving when all you want is stock clock.
May 13, 2012 7:00:33 PM

Best answer selected by Isaac_thegamer.
May 13, 2012 7:03:55 PM

cliffro said:
I can attest to the Push Pins sucking, my old E2160 suffered 90c temps due to just what you described, I glanced in my window and saw my HSF visibly LOOSE even though it wasn't when I closed up my case. Taking the motherboard back out and applying a healthy amount of pressure(after resetting the push-pins) to assure they went all the way in fixed it.


Turns out, it was loose! Who knew it could ever be something that simple? haha This is the 3rd computer I've built with a Push Pin fan, and this is the first time it came loose during travel. It would not come loose if I would have put it in correctly to begin with, so it's definitely my fault. I reset the fan and it's working great now. 30-40 Celcius. Thanks again.
May 13, 2012 7:07:23 PM

InvalidError said:
The push-pin HSFs are infamous for turning out to be incorrectly installed even when they seem visually and mechanically properly attached because a few things can go wrong without necessarily being easily verifiable. Over the past week, there has been something like 20 threads about people seeing unexpectedly high core temps with their stock Intel HSFs, it is a very common problem.

I looked only at the top page of cpu questions, and most of the overheating cpu threads were all about old cpus, cpus that were overclocked, etc. I didn't see anything like this. Yes, it was incorrectly installed, so I have fixed it. Thanks for your response.
a c 101 à CPUs
May 13, 2012 7:36:58 PM

Isaac_thegamer said:
I looked only at the top page of cpu questions, and most of the overheating cpu threads were all about old cpus, cpus that were overclocked, etc.

Be it old or new stock Intel HSFs, the symptoms and fixes are essentially the same: if the heatsink does not heat up when the core temps are unreasonably high, re-install while making extra effort to ensure everything is done correctly every step of the way. If that fails, next step is after-market HSF like the 212+/EVO if it fits.
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