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Fan differences?

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  • Cougar
  • Cases
  • Heatsinks
  • Fan
  • Components
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May 13, 2012 7:21:22 PM

What is the difference between vortex, vortex pwm (apart from variable speeds that is), vortex hdb and turbine?

I know that with noctua fans they are designed accomondate different fan types (heatsink, ventilation etc)

Would it be ok to just use vortex pwm's on all fan slots in a case?

Thanks!

More about : fan differences

May 13, 2012 7:26:27 PM

PWM allows you to control the speeds via motherboard.
May 13, 2012 7:30:11 PM

That I know, but do they have any air spread differences, focussed or spread etc, better use for case fans or for heatsinks etc like the noctua?
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May 13, 2012 8:26:11 PM

Finally managed to find something that describes them adequately.

There are both 120mm and 140mm sizes with three different versions; standard Vortex with 3-pin and Hyper-Spin bearings, with 3-pin and Hydro-Dynamic Bearing and finally 4-pin PWM with Hydro-Dynamic Bearings.

So...

Cougar Vortex = 3-pin with hyper-spin bearings.
Cougar HDB = 3-pin with hydryo-dynamic bearings
Cougar Vortex PWM = 4-pin with hydro-dynamic bearings and variable control.
Cougar Turbine = 3-pin non-PWM with hyper-spin bearings

So basically only the Vortex PWM should be used out of those for compatibility with a H100 etc.
May 13, 2012 8:38:33 PM

Fans differ in speed (RPM), airflow, noise and air pressure. It doesn't really matter if they are PWM or not. Ideally you want high airflow, high air pressure (at least when used on some kind of heatsink, less so when used as a case fan) and low noise.

That's all that there is to know/look for when it comes to fans, style/look aside.
May 13, 2012 8:46:45 PM

Well, I am planning on using 2 x cougar vortex pwm's with my corsair h100 rad, just wanted to know if the other fans in that list would have been ok as a case ventilation fan. Since the Vortex PWM is the only one WITH PWM, then thats the one I'll use.

However I would like positive airflow so if I have those 2 on exhaust and the other ones being less powerful, won't that create negative airflow?
May 13, 2012 8:53:53 PM

You want to use four of them for a push pull config! :) 
May 13, 2012 8:55:28 PM

Considered that, but would have to use the 2nd pair outside the case, using Obsidian 550d. It's kind of important I get an answer to my question in the last post as I am ordering the parts for my new rig tomorrow.

Thanks!
May 14, 2012 10:32:31 AM

For positive air pressure, make sure that your intake fans deliver a higher CFM, than your exhaust fans. Check the specs of all your fans and do the math.

You can also use your H100 fans as intake, too. Blowing cold air from outside the case, through the rad, into the case. Leaving your rear fan (and possibly GPU and/or PSU, depending on which kind of hardware you use and in what config) as the only exhaust.
May 14, 2012 10:41:55 AM

The case I am using is 550d, and I cannot decide at the moment on the airflow design and what fans to use, I want the best cooling for the h100 rad, which should be the Vortex fans, and those are exhaust, maybe I should then switch the two front intakes to be full 12v vortex and have the ones on the RAD on medium setting?
May 14, 2012 11:06:06 AM

Kaytfoh said:
... maybe I should then switch the two front intakes to be full 12v vortex and have the ones on the RAD on medium setting?


Don't forget the exhaust fan in the back of the case. Anyway, the 550D has a really good dust filter system, which makes positive air pressure way less important. Which means, don't over-complicate things, this is no rocket science. ;) 


Narrow it down and do what it takes to achieve your goals:
- you want the best cooling for your H100
- you want positive air pressure

1. Easiest way, like I said before, let the two fans on your H100 be intake fans, not exhaust. DONE.

2. Use those two optional side panel fans as intake, let the two fans on your H100 be exhaust fans, not intake. DONE.

3. Low speed on rear exhaust and H100 exhaust fans, high speed front fans intake. While this would probably meet your "positive air pressure" goal, it will fail the other one, at least compared to option 1 and 2.


I'd go with option one, check my temps and if needed (bad temps) expand to option two.
May 14, 2012 11:34:16 AM

whatsthatnoise said:
Don't forget the exhaust fan in the back of the case. Anyway, the 550D has a really good dust filter system, which makes positive air pressure way less important. Which means, don't over-complicate things, this is no rocket science. ;) 


Narrow it down and do what it takes to achieve your goals:
- you want the best cooling for your H100
- you want positive air pressure

1. Easiest way, like I said before, let the two fans on your H100 be intake fans, not exhaust. DONE.

2. Use those two optional side panel fans as intake, let the two fans on your H100 be exhaust fans, not intake. DONE.

3. Low speed on rear exhaust and H100 exhaust fans, high speed front fans intake. While this would probably meet your "positive air pressure" goal, it will fail the other one, at least compared to option 1 and 2.


I'd go with option one, check my temps and if needed (bad temps) expand to option two.


Could you simplify this and work up a quick paint with arrows to show the airflow? Some have said this is acceptable....


May 14, 2012 2:43:48 PM

A case like that has not many ways for air to get out. In your case it's basically just through the top and through unused PCI slots. Having the rear fan as intake will also pull dust into the case, as this is not meant to be an intake fan, it has no dust filter. All those points hint to "positive air pressure" being not really advisable/needed.


I still think you should stick with my option one and keep the back fan as exhaust, front/bottom intake and let the H100 fans be intake, too. The good thing with this case is that even the top fans have a dust filter, for the exact same reason as having intake fans placed there.

Btw, you can remove one of the 3.5" HDD cages if you don't need it. Improves airflow coming from the front.
May 14, 2012 6:24:06 PM

If I only use the rear fan as exhaust is that not going to create positive pressure anyways and keep hot air in the case longer? I.e;, heat from the H100 blowing down onto my graphics card?
May 14, 2012 7:24:11 PM

Your graphic card should get cold air from the bottom and front intake fans. I just gave advice that's matching your goals in the best way, it should work to keep your H100 performing at it's best and create positive air pressure (not that I believed at any point that you need that kind of pressure and you never explained why you actually want it to be possitive).

Again, put all that crap into your case, check temps and adjust accordingly, if needed. As you might have noticed, there is no one way solution. Just some things you should avoid in general (like the rear fan being intake). Cooling can depend on so many things, like how you set up your pc, is the PSU facing downwards or upwards, the type of cooler on your GPU, the CFM of each of your fans, cable management, ...
May 14, 2012 7:35:40 PM

In my eyes the only hot spots are the motherboard with its passive heatsinks (maximus v gene m-atx) the cpu cooled by the h100, and the gpu itself. The psu will be orientated so it intakes from underneath and exhausts out the back by itself.

Does that affect the fan placement at all?
!