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New Built PC was working until now...

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January 30, 2012 1:07:33 AM

Hey Everyone,

Thanks to everyones help on this forum, I was able to get my PC up and running. However, I have now run into an issue and have no idea what it might be. I finally built a new computer desk to put my PC on. When I went to move my PC to this desk, I plugged it in and it wouldn't come on. The "Activity" light on the front blinked red for a second and the case fan went for less then a millisecond then stopped. I have no idea why it won't come on. Does anyone have a clue? Could I have shorted something out when moving it? I moved the PC when it was off and unplugged. Here are my Specs:

CPU: i5-2500k
Motherboard: Gigabyte Z68AP-D3
RAM - GSkill Rip Jaws 4GBX2
PSU: Antec BP550
Graphics Card: Sapphire Radeon 6950 2GB
Monitor: Samsung SynchMaster E2420

Thanks again everyone!


More about : built working

January 30, 2012 1:38:14 AM

Also to add, the PC repeatedly turns on and off...
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 30, 2012 2:07:07 AM

You should recheck all of the power connectors inside on the motherboard and make sure that the power cord is plugged all the way in. It just sounds like something is loose and you need to recheck everything. Also I would turn off the switch on the power supply and unplug it then check all the power connections and when your ready plug in the cord and turn on the switch. See if this helps.
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January 30, 2012 2:08:20 AM

Thanks for the response. I opened up the case and made sure all of the power connectors were connected the whole way which they are. All of the fans turn for a second before shutting down and the LED on the front turns on as well before restarting...
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 30, 2012 2:31:57 AM

Turn off the power supply switch and take the power cord and unplug it then remove the cmos battery on the motherboard and wait a few minutes and put it back in and plug the power cord back in and turn the power supply switch on. If that don't work then you need to test the power supply;

http://dodji.seketeli.com/downloads/shuttle-psu-paper-c...

You should probably do this test to see if you have a power supply issue.
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January 30, 2012 2:33:15 AM

inzone said:
Turn off the power supply switch and take the power cord and unplug it then remove the cmos battery on the motherboard and wait a few minutes and put it back in and plug the power cord back in and turn the power supply switch on. If that don't work then you need to test the power supply;

http://dodji.seketeli.com/downloads/shuttle-psu-paper-c...

You should probably do this test to see if you have a power supply issue.



Thanks, I will give this a shot. I was just using my PC yesterday, it's weird that moving it from one room to another it suddenly won't come on. :( 
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a c 122 B Homebuilt system
January 30, 2012 2:36:08 AM

Review this thread with the idea to check all of your cabling:
http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/274745-13-step-step...

If no luck, work systematically through our standard checklist and troubleshooting thread:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-read-postin...
I mean work through, not just read over it. We spent a lot of time on this. It should find most of the problems.

If that doesn't work, come back and I can give some more advanced troubleshooting ideas.
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 30, 2012 2:38:17 AM

If in moving it you had any static electricity in you and you discharged it into the Pc then you need to do a reset by removing the cmos battery or if by some incredible coiencedence the power supply had a defect and it just stopped working , thats why the paper clip test.
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January 30, 2012 2:39:14 AM

Do you have other computer parts to exchange parts to eliminate defective components? Even if they are not interchangeable you could still see if your power supply is broken by using it to power your older computer. If it isn't this it could be an issue with your motherboard since it refuses to power up.
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January 30, 2012 11:55:26 AM

Phyrexiancure said:
Do you have other computer parts to exchange parts to eliminate defective components? Even if they are not interchangeable you could still see if your power supply is broken by using it to power your older computer. If it isn't this it could be an issue with your motherboard since it refuses to power up.


This is actually my first built PC (The rest were laptops)...So it's going to be hard to diagnose it this way.

I just have no idea how i picked it up, carried it 20 feet and it stopped working. Makes no sense. I took out CMOS battery before I left for work and will reinstall when I get home...
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January 30, 2012 9:33:41 PM

Hey Everyone,

As a Status Update. ONce I got home, I put back in the CMOS battery and it still did the same thing. So I followed all of the guides to troubleshoot the issue and can't find out the issue. I took everything out of the case and had just the CPU, Heat Sink Fan and Power Supply connected. It did the same thing...My only guess is an issue with my PSU?

Anyone have any other suggestions?
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 30, 2012 9:38:05 PM

You tried the paper clip test?
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January 30, 2012 9:41:06 PM

Yup. The fan does the same thing, goes for a little then stops...
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 30, 2012 9:47:38 PM

Then you have a bad psu if it fails the paper clip test.
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January 30, 2012 9:55:37 PM

I just tried the paper clip test again, the PSU fan CONTINUES to spin...which leads me to believe the PSU is fine...
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January 30, 2012 10:02:08 PM

I don't see how I could have done damage to the MOBO by just moving the whole computer to a different room...
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 30, 2012 10:52:23 PM

I don't either but something's not right if the psu is good and the Pc still don't work and you have checked and recheced every power connector and the ram and video card. If course it's hard not being there and seeing what you see and having to do everything with posting answers and replies.
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January 30, 2012 10:58:06 PM

Yeah, it truly sucks...I have no idea what I need to replace either since I don't have spare parts...Even though the Paper Clip test had the fan running in the PSU, I still think it has to be something with that...idk why.
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 30, 2012 10:58:51 PM

When you did the paper clip test was the main power connector like what is shown in the instructions the only connector that you unplugged? If you did the paper clip test with all the fans plugged into the motherboard then they all should have started working not kust the psu fan. I have done that very same thing only with a jumper because I have water cooling and it's they way to test the water loop for leaks before you actually try to run the Pc and everything is supposed to come on except the cpu.
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 30, 2012 11:02:10 PM

Have you checked the cpu power connector next to the cpu socket?
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January 30, 2012 11:23:53 PM

inzone said:
Have you checked the cpu power connector next to the cpu socket?

What about the connector? I did connect it.
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 30, 2012 11:37:08 PM

Nice video and it does help to see what is happening. Now I see that there is intermitent on/off of the fans and it only happens when you touch the power switch and since that is sending the signal to the psu to start and there is not a contiuous starting of the Pc then it has to be the psu. Is there a reset button on the psu?
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January 30, 2012 11:41:42 PM

inzone said:
Nice video and it does help to see what is happening. Now I see that there is intermitent on/off of the fans and it only happens when you touch the power switch and since that is sending the signal to the psu to start and there is not a contiuous starting of the Pc then it has to be the psu. Is there a reset button on the psu?



I appreciate all of your help so far. Thanks. I couldn't find a reset switch as I was looking. I have an Antec BP550 :( 
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 30, 2012 11:44:07 PM

When you did the paper clip test did all of the fans work or just the psu fan?
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January 30, 2012 11:47:07 PM

inzone said:
When you did the paper clip test did all of the fans work or just the psu fan?


I just did it with just the PSU which worked...When I had it connected to the MOBO and tried it, none of the fans spun. But I read you shouldn't try it that way.
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 30, 2012 11:47:42 PM

The connector that is pluged into the cpu power socket is it a 4 pin or 8 pin?
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January 30, 2012 11:49:32 PM

inzone said:
The connector that is pluged into the cpu power socket is it a 4 pin or 8 pin?


It is a 4 Pin
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 30, 2012 11:54:21 PM

Ok I have a water cooling system for my computer and when you want to test for leaks after putting it together you do the very same thing as the paper clip test and everything is pluged in except the main power connector which you are using for the jumper or paper clip. Everything starts up when the jumper is put in the power socket and that way the pumps and fans work so you can see if there are any leaks without something getting damaged if there is a leak. So you actually want to have a fan or two pluged into one of the cables from the psu so you can see if they work and not just the psu fan.
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a c 122 B Homebuilt system
January 31, 2012 12:00:44 AM

OK. Our "standard" troubleshooting thread didn't work, right?

Do you have an internal case speaker attached to the motherboard? If not, you really need one.

The following is an expansion of my troubleshooting tips in the breadboarding link in the "Cannot boot" thread.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-read-postin...

I have tested the following beep patterns on Gigabyte, eVGA, and ECS motherboards. Other BIOS' may be different, but they all use a single short beep for a successful POST.

Breadboard - that will help isolate any kind of case problem you might have.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/262730-31-breadboardi...

Breadboard with just motherboard, CPU & HSF, case speaker, and PSU. Breadboard with just motherboard, CPU & HSF, case speaker, and PSU. At this point, if you do not have a system (internal case) speaker, you really need one.


Make sure you plug the CPU power cable in. The system will not boot without it.

I always breadboard a new build. It takes only a few minutes, and you know you are putting good parts in the case once you are finished.

You can turn on the PC by momentarily shorting the two pins that the case power switch goes to. You should hear a series of long, single beeps indicating memory problems. Silence indicates a problem with (in most likely order) the PSU, motherboard, or CPU. Remember, at this time, you do not have a graphics card installed so the load on your PSU will be reduced.

If no beeps, LED's, or fan activity:

Check for line power at the PSU input. Extension cords, power strips, and power cords do fail.

If you have power and no beeps, suspect components in likely order are PSU, motherboard, and CPU.

Running fans and drives and motherboard LED's do not necessarily indicate a good PSU. In the absence of a single short beep, they also do not indicate that the system is booting.

At this point, you can sort of check the PSU. Try to borrow a known good PSU of around 550 - 600 watts. That will power just about any system with a single GPU. If you cannot do that, use a DMM to measure the voltages. Measure between the colored wires and either chassis ground or the black wires. Yellow wires should be 12 volts. Red wires: +5 volts, orange wires: +3.3 volts, blue wire : -12 volts, violet wire: 5 volts always on. Tolerances are +/- 5% except for the -12 volts which is +/- 10%.

The gray wire is really important. It should go from 0 to +5 volts when you turn the PSU on with the case switch. CPU needs this signal to boot.

You can turn on the PSU by completely disconnecting the PSU and using a paperclip or jumper wire to short the green wire to one of the neighboring black wires.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FWXgQSokF4&feature=yout...

A way that might be easier is to use the main power plug. Working from the back of the plug where the wires come out, use a bare paperclip to short between the green wire and one of the neighboring black wires. That will do the same thing with an installed PSU. It is also an easy way to bypass a questionable case power switch.

This checks the PSU under no load conditions, so it is not completely reliable. But if it can not pass this, it is dead. Then repeat the checks with the PSU plugged into the computer to put a load on the PSU.

If the system beeps:
If it looks like the PSU is good, install a memory stick. Boot. Beep pattern should change to one long and several short beeps indicating a missing graphics card.

Silence, long single beeps, or series of short beeps indicate a problem with the memory. If you get short beeps verify that the memory is in the appropriate motherboard slots.

Insert the video card and connect any necessary PCIe power connectors. Boot. At this point, the system should POST successfully (a single short beep). Notice that you do not need keyboard, mouse, monitor, or drives to successfully POST.
At this point, if the system doesn't work, it's either the video card or an inadequate PSU. Or rarely - the motherboard's PCIe interface.

Now start connecting the rest of the devices starting with the monitor, then keyboard and mouse, then the rest of the devices, testing after each step. It's possible that you can pass the POST with a defective video card. The POST routines can only check the video interface. It cannot check the internal parts of the video card.
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January 31, 2012 12:06:39 AM

jsc said:
OK. Our "standard" troubleshooting thread didn't work, right?

Do you have an internal case speaker attached to the motherboard? If not, you really need one.

The following is an expansion of my troubleshooting tips in the breadboarding link in the "Cannot boot" thread.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-read-postin...

I have tested the following beep patterns on Gigabyte, eVGA, and ECS motherboards. Other BIOS' may be different, but they all use a single short beep for a successful POST.

Breadboard - that will help isolate any kind of case problem you might have.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/262730-31-breadboardi...

Breadboard with just motherboard, CPU & HSF, case speaker, and PSU. Breadboard with just motherboard, CPU & HSF, case speaker, and PSU. At this point, if you do not have a system (internal case) speaker, you really need one.


Make sure you plug the CPU power cable in. The system will not boot without it.

I always breadboard a new build. It takes only a few minutes, and you know you are putting good parts in the case once you are finished.

You can turn on the PC by momentarily shorting the two pins that the case power switch goes to. You should hear a series of long, single beeps indicating memory problems. Silence indicates a problem with (in most likely order) the PSU, motherboard, or CPU. Remember, at this time, you do not have a graphics card installed so the load on your PSU will be reduced.

If no beeps, LED's, or fan activity:

Check for line power at the PSU input. Extension cords, power strips, and power cords do fail.

If you have power and no beeps, suspect components in likely order are PSU, motherboard, and CPU.

Running fans and drives and motherboard LED's do not necessarily indicate a good PSU. In the absence of a single short beep, they also do not indicate that the system is booting.

At this point, you can sort of check the PSU. Try to borrow a known good PSU of around 550 - 600 watts. That will power just about any system with a single GPU. If you cannot do that, use a DMM to measure the voltages. Measure between the colored wires and either chassis ground or the black wires. Yellow wires should be 12 volts. Red wires: +5 volts, orange wires: +3.3 volts, blue wire : -12 volts, violet wire: 5 volts always on. Tolerances are +/- 5% except for the -12 volts which is +/- 10%.

The gray wire is really important. It should go from 0 to +5 volts when you turn the PSU on with the case switch. CPU needs this signal to boot.

You can turn on the PSU by completely disconnecting the PSU and using a paperclip or jumper wire to short the green wire to one of the neighboring black wires.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FWXgQSokF4&feature=yout...

A way that might be easier is to use the main power plug. Working from the back of the plug where the wires come out, use a bare paperclip to short between the green wire and one of the neighboring black wires. That will do the same thing with an installed PSU. It is also an easy way to bypass a questionable case power switch.

This checks the PSU under no load conditions, so it is not completely reliable. But if it can not pass this, it is dead. Then repeat the checks with the PSU plugged into the computer to put a load on the PSU.

If the system beeps:
If it looks like the PSU is good, install a memory stick. Boot. Beep pattern should change to one long and several short beeps indicating a missing graphics card.

Silence, long single beeps, or series of short beeps indicate a problem with the memory. If you get short beeps verify that the memory is in the appropriate motherboard slots.

Insert the video card and connect any necessary PCIe power connectors. Boot. At this point, the system should POST successfully (a single short beep). Notice that you do not need keyboard, mouse, monitor, or drives to successfully POST.
At this point, if the system doesn't work, it's either the video card or an inadequate PSU. Or rarely - the motherboard's PCIe interface.

Now start connecting the rest of the devices starting with the monitor, then keyboard and mouse, then the rest of the devices, testing after each step. It's possible that you can pass the POST with a defective video card. The POST routines can only check the video interface. It cannot check the internal parts of the video card.




Yes, I did follow through this whole guide. I did breadboard and listened for Beeps...I received no beeps. :( . I truly have NOOO idea what it is.
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January 31, 2012 12:34:38 AM

inzone said:
Ok I have a water cooling system for my computer and when you want to test for leaks after putting it together you do the very same thing as the paper clip test and everything is pluged in except the main power connector which you are using for the jumper or paper clip. Everything starts up when the jumper is put in the power socket and that way the pumps and fans work so you can see if there are any leaks without something getting damaged if there is a leak. So you actually want to have a fan or two pluged into one of the cables from the psu so you can see if they work and not just the psu fan.



That makes sense. So do you think it is the PSU based on how the fans go on and off constantly?
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 31, 2012 1:16:25 AM

Well it sure seems like the video shows that power is intermittently being applied to the motherboard and thats why I wanted you to do the paper clip test with fans pluged into the cables coming directly from the psu. When you did the test before you only did it to the psu and the psu fan came on so now if you do the test again with seperate fans attached to the psu and if they work along with the psu fan then you end up pointing the finger at the motherboard. The motherboard has voltage regulators on it and that could also cause this problem if one of them was to have gone bad or is defective.
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January 31, 2012 12:36:02 PM

inzone said:
Well it sure seems like the video shows that power is intermittently being applied to the motherboard and thats why I wanted you to do the paper clip test with fans pluged into the cables coming directly from the psu. When you did the test before you only did it to the psu and the psu fan came on so now if you do the test again with seperate fans attached to the psu and if they work along with the psu fan then you end up pointing the finger at the motherboard. The motherboard has voltage regulators on it and that could also cause this problem if one of them was to have gone bad or is defective.



I did do the Paper Clip test again with the PSU connected with other fans (GPU, HeatSink)...and none of the fans came on including the PSU fan. I hope that I did that right....If that's the case, I would point towards the PSU??
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February 2, 2012 7:38:48 PM

Hey everyone,

As a status update. I tried the paper clip test again to ensure the PSU was working. The fan was running without any problems. Does this mean I have an issue with my MoBo? It's hard to determine what I should return :( 
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April 22, 2012 8:22:38 PM

Return the PSU since it's simple enough to remove, you've probably already done something as this thread is a couple months old. If when you get the PSU back and it does the same thing, return the mobo and see if the replacement works. I'm having somewhat similar issues but my system will actually power on 99% of the time and run fine.
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!