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Very first build

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January 30, 2012 9:57:20 PM

I plan on building my first PC and have done research but would like to verify component compatibility as well as see if those more experienced have any recommendations for the parts list I have put together. Nothing has been purchased yet so depending on the suggestions, anything can changeā€¦ I would like for this build to last me at least a few years and would like to be able to upgrade components to continue use without needing to purchase another system.
This build will be used for everything from gaming to heavy internet surfing and possible video editing. It will also be connected to a 55" 1080p TV (HDMI) for use as a media center PC. I have no intention of using multiple graphics cards at the moment but that may change in the future. Overclocking is a good possibility. Any help and recommendations are appreciated!!!
Thanks!

Approximate Purchase Date: The sooner the better

Budget Range: $1500 - $2000

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Online Database Access/Web Surfing, Watching Movies and Light Gaming.

Parts Not Required: keyboard, mouse, monitor, speakers (have but may upgrade)

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: newegg.com (best price/service) Microcenter about an hour away!

Country: USA

Parts Preferences: full tower case, Intel i7 processor. No real brand loyalty, just looking for good quality and a manufacturer that stands behind their products.

Overclocking: Maybe

SLI or Crossfire: Maybe

Monitor Resolution: 1920x1080

Additional Comments: The quieter the better but not at the expense of performance.

Here's the list:

MOBO: ASUS P8Z68 DELUXE/GEN3

CPU: Intel Core i7-2600K (BX80623I72600K) Graphics 3000

CPU COOLING: Noctua NH-D14

RAM: G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800)

GPU: ASUS ENGTX560 TI DCII TOP/2DI/1GD5 (900MHz)

PSU: CORSAIR Professional Series Gold AX850

CASE: NZXT Switch 810 (also like the look of Thermaltake Level 10 GT but not sure if I can justify the price)

HDD (SSD): Crucial M4 CT256M4SSD2 2.5" 256GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive (still on the fence regarding the SSD)

HDD Storage: WD Caviar Black WD1502FAEX 1.5TB 7200 RPM SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5"

Optical: LG Black Internal 12X Super Multi Blue with 3D Playback Blu-ray Disc Rewriter SATA WH12LS38 LightScribe

Multi/SD Card Reader: Suggestions? (SD is needed but if a multi-reader can be found for close to the same price, even better)

OS: Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit

More about : build

January 30, 2012 10:28:20 PM

A ssd should definitely be in a build of this size, but 256gb is a lot. Look for a crucial m4 128gb, or a samsung 830 128gb. both are very good options, and i think the 830 is a little better.

there's very little difference between the i5 2500k and the i7 2600k, especially after overclocking, you just have to decide if the hyperthreading is something you absolutely need.

the noctuna is a great cooler, but far too expensive for me for an air cooler. you can get basically the same performance with the coolermaster hyper 212 evo:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

if not that then you can consider a closed pipe water cooling solution like the corsair h60, but air cooling solutions typically beat them or have similar performance.

that 560ti is way too expensive, go for this:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

also, you really don't need an 850 watt psu, the total output of your system should be like 450-500watts.
this would suffice even if you intended on doing SLI in the future: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

this would be a more efficient and higher quality one to consider:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

also, i really don't think you need a $250 mobo if you're not doing like triple sli... go for something like this, supports sli in the future, usb 3.0, sata 3 ports:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

oh, another thing, please don't spend $150 on dual channel memory. if you get the i7 that supports quad channel memory and this will suffice for $89: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

if you go for the i5 2500k just get an 8gb kit...it's prolly enough and soo much cheaper:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

also, it should always be mentioned that if you are near a microcenter, you can buy the i5 2500k there for 179, and the 2600k for 279. you also get $50 off if you combo the cpu with a motherboard there.
January 30, 2012 10:34:22 PM

Ok so I know you said the sooner the better, but Ivy Bridge is coming in April. Might want to wait.

First, the mobo is fantastic, but the mATX Maximus Gene Z is beastly and can do SLI/Crossfire is the future. It's a ROG board and it's cheaper.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

No need to go for a 2600K for gaming, won't make a difference between 2500K. But I would just go for a i3 2100 and upgrade to a 3770K (Ivy Bridge 2700K equivalent) in the future.
Cooler is fantastic, the absolute best you can buy (besides WC)

OMG why are you spending so much on a 16GB set. 8GB is more than enough even for heavy web surfing.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Everything else looks fine (considering you went for a 850w PSU for SLI/Crossfire in the future). The case is great if you want to go full WC someday. If not, just opt for a Fractal Arc Midi or CM Storm Trooper. I would go cheaper on a HDD since HDD prices are ridiculous.
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January 31, 2012 7:25:13 PM

e56imfg said:
Ok so I know you said the sooner the better, but Ivy Bridge is coming in April.


Which parts listed are not Ivy Bridge compatible?

canyoudigit489 said:
also, it should always be mentioned that if you are near a microcenter, you can buy the i5 2500k there for 179, and the 2600k for 279. you also get $50 off if you combo the cpu with a motherboard there.


The closest microcenter is about an hour away from me, so I may just stop in and pay them a visit!
January 31, 2012 7:52:40 PM

Be careful of spacing if you go the CoolerMaster 212 route. Some people have had spacing issues with their memory heatsinks. I played it safe and went with low profile ram to avoid this issue on my system.
January 31, 2012 8:55:51 PM

Crush3d said:
Be careful of spacing if you go the CoolerMaster 212 route. Some people have had spacing issues with their memory heatsinks. I played it safe and went with low profile ram to avoid this issue on my system.


I saw the Corsair vengeance low profile memory. Would that be a better option than the G.Skill? Please correct me if my logic is flawed, but I figured going with the 2 x 8gb kit would futureproof my system rather than having to remove a 2 x 4gb or 4 x 4gb kit a couple years from now to upgrade. Are peoples having issues with the 8gb memory sticks?

Thanks again for all the helpful responses!
January 31, 2012 9:24:22 PM

Everything is IB compatible but what I meant was you should just save your money for just one CPU instead of buying multiple to upgrade later. There are dedicated IB mobos, too (Z77) that will take full potential of IB when it comes out.

So in short, I was just saying to save your money for one CPU and instead of buying multiple CPUs.
January 31, 2012 9:58:52 PM

johnny1911 said:
I saw the Corsair vengeance low profile memory. Would that be a better option than the G.Skill? Please correct me if my logic is flawed, but I figured going with the 2 x 8gb kit would futureproof my system rather than having to remove a 2 x 4gb or 4 x 4gb kit a couple years from now to upgrade. Are peoples having issues with the 8gb memory sticks?

Thanks again for all the helpful responses!



Realistically, 16GB of memory in any form is pretty future proof at the moment as far as I know. I don't do much work in your area of usage with my PC which is centered on gaming, so I am not sure how memory intensive your work is.

Also, keep the following in mind.. as far as I know this is up to date and accurate. Straight from the Microsoft website.

x64 Memory limits

Windows 7 Professional: 192 GB
Windows 7 Home Premium: 16 GB
Windows 7 Home Basic: 8 GB

If you get Home Premium and 2x8GB memory you are literally wasting money as you have hit your memory cap and have slots left (you have 4 memory slots and 4x4GB is cheaper than 2x8GB).
January 31, 2012 11:07:33 PM

You won't see any benefits in the near future with 16GB RAM. Stay at 8GB.
February 1, 2012 1:56:56 PM

8gb (2 x 4gb) it is!
Thanks for breaking it down for me. The last thing I want to do is throw $ into something I'll never see the benefit of!
February 1, 2012 4:04:42 PM

canyoudigit489 said:
oh, another thing, please don't spend $150 on dual channel memory. if you get the i7 that supports quad channel memory and this will suffice for $89: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Will I need a different mobo to support the i7 that supports the quad channel memory?
February 1, 2012 9:45:43 PM

johnny1911 said:
Will I need a different mobo to support the i7 that supports the quad channel memory?

Yes, the X79. But they are extremely pricy :/  You also need a $600-$1000 CPU to be compatible with the mobo.
!