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Computer freezes wile gaming certain games.

Last response: in Components
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Anonymous
May 16, 2012 4:10:39 PM

My computer freezes up wile i play Diablo 3 or Kingdom of amalur, wile playing games like League of legends or any of the modern warfare games work just fine.

Ill toss out my specs here for those that might need them:

Operating System: Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit (everything is updated yesterday)
Mobo: Gigabyte X58A-UD7
BIOS: Award Modular BIOS v6.00PG
Ram: Corsair Dominator DHX+ DDR3 1600MHz 6GB
Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i7 CPU 930 @ 2.80GHz (8 CPUs), ~2.8GHz
Card name: ATI Radeon HD 5800 Series (latest driver, updated yesterday)

Powersupply: Cossair 1000W
I also have 11 hard drives and 2 different raidcontrollers connected. Nothing is set up in raid, i just needed the extra S-ATA plugs.

My temperatures wile gaming:

CPU 52 - 55C
GFX 62 - 66C


Would like to point out that the games that freezes are located on a different harddrive (my SSD got filled up)
I have now uninstalled some games and i am currently installing D3 again on my main disk. But i really doubt its something wrong with it.
I have searching for bad sectors and all that.

When i play, it usually takes from 30 min to 2 hours before the computer freezes. I do not get a bluescreen. It the images on the computer just freeze, and i cant press anything except the shutdown button.

Is there some sort of tests i can do to figure out what components are "broken"

Also, when i reboot the computer after a crash it usually freezes at at the windows logo, right before the login screen. Like 10-15 sec into the "waving" logo.
What sort of things are the computer working with here?
If i shut the computer down for 2-3 min before starting it up again its no problem getting back inn.

Now how do i go about trying to figure out witch components are broken? i really dont want to buy a new rig. I know my self well enough that if i start looking at componets i am going to end up spending 2000 Euro on it. And my current computer works just fine for my needs.

Also like to point out that if i dont play those 2 games, i can have my computer up and running for 3 months without a reboot and everything is working smoothly
May 16, 2012 4:45:37 PM

Something is overheating. When is the last time you cleaned the dust out of your case, parts, and fans?
May 16, 2012 5:06:50 PM

Sounds like heat is stressing out the PSU.

What case are you using?
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Anonymous
May 16, 2012 5:29:21 PM

Removed dust from the computer less than a month ago.

And for the case im using its cossair 800D


I really doubt its the heat. As my temps are stated above as:

CPU 55 degrees Celsius, its 131 Fahrenheit
And GFX is 66 degrees, its 150.8 Fahrenheit


The temps are not idle, but wile gaming.

May 16, 2012 6:47:27 PM

I would stress test those two components and run memtest.

Computer not booting into windows would indicate incorrect overclock or bad system files.
Computer hard locking up or resetting during the first minutes of gaming would indicate incorrect overclock or power issue.
Computer hard locking up after hours of usage, but starting and working normally after 5 minutes rest, would indicate overheating (any number of parts).
Computer BSOD would indicate RAM issue or driver error (depending on the error message).
Computer rebooting on its own would indicate power issue (dirty power from wall, failing psu, or not enough amps/watts).

These are just a few of the possibilities. You really have to run tests to narrow down what it is.
May 16, 2012 7:59:32 PM

What heat is in your CPU and your video card doesn't really matter as to the heat in the PSU.

All that matters is how much wattage you are pulling from the PSU, the efficiency at that load %, and the quality and quantity of airflow moving through the PSU.

Horrible efficiency at a given load % would mean that you are pulling a lot from the wall to get the same amount to the components. The difference between those two totals would be turned into heat inside the PSU by the components inside it.

High quality/quantity airflow through the PSU works to counteract the negative effects of the above.

It sounds to me like the quantity/quality of the airflow through the PSU isn't high enough.

I am not super familiar with this case other than knowing that it is ridiculously expensive and has a bottom mount PSU rack.

Tell me, is the PSU intake fan mounted facing up into the case or downwards?
If it is facing down towards the ground, are there holes directly below the PSU in the case?
If there are such holes, is the PC on some sort of surface where they can't be utilized (like carpet)?

Two other questions:
1) How old is this PSU?
2) Do you have a different video card laying around or accessible? Ideally a less powerful one, but any would work.
Anonymous
May 16, 2012 10:50:22 PM

The PSU is around 1.5 years old.
The intake has a dust filter, cleaned around 1 month ago. Have hardwood floors and the case have "feet" so its lifted around 1.5cm from the floor.

I tried an old trick to see it it worked.
I pleased a huge table fan directed at the mobo, i played for over 4 hours without any trouble.

So now i just need to figure out witch component is heating up.
In my case there is an own "compartment for the PSU, i do not think much air got inn there of course some got inn there. But it cant me a lot.
Would it help if i disconnected a bunch of harddrives? would the heat in the psu go down then ? ( i got 11 of them)
May 17, 2012 12:12:42 AM

Worth a try on the hd part, also check your cable management and make sure fans are doing positive air flow according to Toms.
May 17, 2012 12:47:01 AM

Good lord on the 11 hard drives. That must be creating some kinda heat.

Anyway, here is what you can do.

Leave the hard drives in, but take the psu physically out of the case. Leave it plugged in and just set it on its side on the ground so the PSU can suck in air from pretty much the whole room.

Try it like that and see what happens. Dont have the fan pointed at anything at this time.
!