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Wireless Connected but no internet with static IP

Last response: in Networking
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February 20, 2011 2:13:50 PM

First, I apologize. I have a strong sense that this is somewhere on the internet but I can't find the correct key words to get the information.


The Setup:
1x Buffalo Router (WZR-HP-300NH) with DHCP enabled and 5 addresses available (and I believe running a version of DD-WRT but I am not overly experienced with it yet)
1x Wired Computer with static IP
1x Wired Wii with static IP
1x Wireless-G Computer connected with WPA2-AES with Dynamic IP
1x Wireless-G HP 6500 Printer connected with WPA2-AES with Static IP


The Problem:
The wireless computer, if set with a static IP, will connect to the network but not see the internet. When assigned by the DHCP, it connects and uses the internet without a problem. I don't recall ever having this problem before with my previous wireless router but it has been ages since I set that one up.



In the end, I want all my devices to have static IPs and leave only 2ish DHCP addresses setup for visitors with laptops.


Ultimately, I would be happy with some helpful hints and I'll be happy to post the solution for others if it works.
Like I said before, I have this sinking suspicion that it's an easy fix and that I'm just overlooking the obvious in my frustration.

Thank you

P.S. I can also provide more info, I just provided all that seemed applicable so as not to clutter this post.

Best solution

a b F Wireless
February 20, 2011 2:19:09 PM

Make sure each device using a static IP also has a default gateway IP set to the IP address of the router. This is why it's often better to have your devices always use DHCP, but if you want a static IP for some devices, reserve them in the DHCP configuration of the router. Most routers allow you to bind specific IP addresses to specific devices based on MAC address.
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February 20, 2011 2:30:09 PM

eibgrad said:
Make sure each device using a static IP also has a default gateway IP set to the IP address of the router. This is why it's often better to have your devices always use DHCP, but if you want a static IP for some devices, reserve them in the DHCP configuration of the router. Most routers allow you to bind specific IP addresses to specific devices based on MAC address.



Ah, good tips I should have mentioned in my first post.
All my static IP devices have these things added:
- Desired IP outside the DHCP range, but within the routers IP range (e.g. router is 192.168.11.1, DHCP is from 192.168.11.2 to 192.168.11.7 and my static IP's start at 192.168.11.100)
- The subnet mask is the same (255.255.255.0)
- The gateway is the same (192.168.11.1)
- The DNS server has been set to 192.168.11.1 and more recently the ISP provided ISPs (both work on my wired connections).


On reserving IPs, I always thought that you reserve a range for DHCP and then all the others (except the router) are free for static use. But it sounds like you want me to reserve a range in my DHCP for static addresses as well. Just want to make sure I'm reading your post correctly.


I have not yet tried binding IP address to MAC addresses. Planned to try that for security reasons, but didn't think it would help the internet issue.


Thanks
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February 20, 2011 5:22:56 PM

.... and then, just to make a liar out of me... it works.

Can't be sure, maybe I typed something in wrong while running between computers, or maybe the router was just sitting on it's thumbs before... who knows, but it works.

Sorry for the post.
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March 2, 2011 3:14:09 AM

Best answer selected by Phaedrus567.
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