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I7 3770 (non k) temps

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May 17, 2012 7:30:49 PM

I am curious about average temps (idle and load) for the i7 3770. I've heard the i7 3770k runs quite a bit hotter than a i7 2600k when being overclocked. But I'm interested in the non k version. My i7 2600 runs in the 30's idle and close to 50C under load.

The thing is I have a chance to upgrade to a i7 3770 at no cost - from my i7 2600, and I know its not great performance boost, but I wonder if its worth it just for the newer generation/tech and the native PCIe 3.0. And I do quite a bit of video work- I just can't seem to find any good info on the regular 3770's temps.

I would have already upgraded, but Im a little worried about all the talk about the 3770k temps getting higher than a 2600k. Does this only apply to the "k" version when being oveclocked?

If so does anyone have any idle and load temps on a non k 3770, and can tell me what kind of cooler/heatsnk they are using. I'll be using a Asetek closed loop cooler.

Basically my question is this- Would a i7 3770 (non k) run as cool as a i7 2600 (non k), using the same cooling set-up. Or will the Ivy Bridge chips be hotter than Sandy Bridge no matter what?

More about : 3770 temps

a b à CPUs
May 17, 2012 8:17:19 PM

All the "K" means is that it has an unlocked multiplier which makes it easier to overclock, it has no bearing on whether it will run hotter then another chip(unless you overclock it of course).

I have not read up on the temp differences between Ivy and Sandy, but i figure they should be about the same if not less. Remember that Ivy is just a die shrink of Sandy with beefed up GPU circutry integrated on. From what ive seen here on Toms, Ivy uses slightly lower power, hence heat output should be slightly lower as well.

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a c 109 à CPUs
May 17, 2012 8:24:36 PM
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From what I understand, idle temperatures for IB aren't that different from SB. It's when they're overclocked+stressed that they start producing tremendous amounts of heat. Since you're not overclocking, I wouldn't worry one bit.

Also about your upgrade, it would be wise since it's a tad bit faster than SB (plus, no overclocking on your 2600, right?), and heck it's free. Why not? :lol: 
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May 17, 2012 8:40:55 PM

hapkiman, what motherboard are you using? Are you upgrading your mobo too? Getting a z77 or what? If you're not upgrading your mobo and it doesn't support PCIe 3.0 you will not reap the benefits of PCIe 3 as everything is the chain must also support PCIe 3.0 in order to have "full" or "true" PCIe 3.0 support. Otherwise, it's only as good as the weakest link in that chain i.e. mobo, chipsets, CPU, GPU etc.

I've been waiting to find answers to these same questions on the 3770 same as hapkiman. I want to see some test results to confirm the i7 3770 (without the k) will not overheat before I buy. I mean, hapkiman & I will both be working on video so, I'm wondering if that load will be enough to overheat the Ivy 3770?

I'd also like to know if the stock cooler from Intel is good enough or not too?

a c 188 à CPUs
May 17, 2012 8:47:01 PM

Under stock voltage the 3rd generation Intel® Core™ processors should run temperatures just like the 2nd generation Intel Core processor did. Before I overclocked my Intel Core i5-3570K its temperatures were even lower then I had with my older Intel Core i7-2600K system.


Christian Wood
Intel Enthusiast Team
a b à CPUs
May 17, 2012 9:07:36 PM

Make sure you flash your mobo to the lates bios before swapping out to the Ivy or you may not be able to boot.

I can't think of any reason *not* to swap to the Ivy if it's no-cost. You'll get up to a 15% improvement (depending on the app) for free.
May 18, 2012 2:21:01 PM

I'd like to see some test results on the i7 3770 (without the k) on Intel's stock CPU cooler to confirm the heat issue one way or the other.

I don't feel comfortable taking a chance on the heat issue when it gets up to 80f inside my house since we don't have central air. We basically live in a desert in the summer. I can't risk this CPU dying on me due to heat exhaustion.
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May 18, 2012 2:58:04 PM

josejones said:
I'd like to see some test results on the i7 3770 (without the k) on Intel's stock CPU cooler to confirm the heat issue one way or the other.

I don't feel comfortable taking a chance on the heat issue when it gets up to 80f inside my house since we don't have central air. We basically live in a desert in the summer. I can't risk this CPU dying on me due to heat exhaustion.


Using the stock heatsink in 80F ambient temps will affect over CPU temps. It may not nessicarly overheat and shutdown on you, but if the surrounding air that is being pulled into the case is warm/hot then it will inevitably bring up the temps of the chip.

Going with an aftermarket cooler would help and water cooling would be even better, but you still need to remember that they will all be sucking in hot air. The 3770 produces about as much heat as the 2600(they're basically the same chip, just built on a smaller die).
May 19, 2012 1:09:05 AM

Yes I am swapping out the mobo to a Z77, not sure which exact one though. But it is one made for the i7 3770. Also one good thing is my office where the computer sets is usually quite cool, around 70 F, sometimes a little cooler in the 60s F (its a basement). Sometimes if I opened the side of my case and pointed this little fan towards the tower - my Sandy Bridge would dip down into the mid 20s idle (strangely, an older Dell rig I had with a Phenom II x6 1090T, would actually drop into the teens sometimes, I saw it hit 13C on all 6 cores once (idle of course), and it only had the stock AMD heatsink, although it was kind of a huge one if you've ever seen it)- and the SB rig had an Asetek closed loop water cooler.

I was just hoping that IB runs about the same as SB. Even if its just a tad higher that won't be a huge deal for me, I just didn't want some crazy high temps jumping into the high 60s or 70s, when I played an occasional game of BF3. Or if I was doing some work in Maya.

Also, does anyone know what the max temp is gonna be for the 3770? I thought the TCase temp for the i7 2600 was 72.6C. Is this the max temp for it? Or am I wrong?
May 20, 2012 2:42:46 AM

Ok just saw the posts in the IB thread (wished I'd noticed that section sooner).

Yes, there are definitely some of us out here that are not overclockers or hardcore gamers, and we might want a "vanilla" non k i7 3770.

I just hope that someone from Intel reads these forums and sees this temp issue is something that consumers are interested/worried about. I feel pretty good about getting my 3770 since this office stays nice and cool all summer (and I have a basic liquid cooling set-up), but I would be a little more concerned too if it was a warm 85 F room like you are saying, and I was only using the Intel stock heatsink.

Just FYI - I think Intel is offering a liquid cooling option now that you might consider. It's almost the exact same one I'm using from Asetek.

http://www.legitreviews.com/article/1784/1/

Looks like they are about $70 though, so I guess you could probably find another cooling option cheaper than that, and I'm not sure anyway what kind of heatsink IB will come with stock. Maybe they made a better one than came with SB.
June 3, 2012 1:23:59 AM

Best answer selected by hapkiman.
October 20, 2012 7:17:57 PM

I have an i7 3770 with a gigabyte z77-ds3h, I can confirm that I have heat issues :pfff: 

With the stock cooler at stock speeds I had idle temps of 45c and load (Prime 95 stress test) I saw 90c ! I shut it down and waited until I could afford a decent cooler. I've built enough systems to know that it was all assembled correctly.

With an Arctic Freezer 13 PRO CPU Cooler I'm getting idle 28c and under load 70c (using prime95).

What can I say I'm totally gutted and regret purchasing this processor, avoid the non k in my opinion unless you want a heat issue of your own.

:non:  shame on you intel :non: 
a b à CPUs
October 20, 2012 8:53:08 PM

PorlC said:
I have an i7 3770 with a gigabyte z77-ds3h, I can confirm that I have heat issues :pfff: 

With the stock cooler at stock speeds I had idle temps of 45c and load (Prime 95 stress test) I saw 90c ! I shut it down and waited until I could afford a decent cooler. I've built enough systems to know that it was all assembled correctly.

With an Arctic Freezer 13 PRO CPU Cooler I'm getting idle 28c and under load 70c (using prime95).

What can I say I'm totally gutted and regret purchasing this processor, avoid the non k in my opinion unless you want a heat issue of your own.

:non:  shame on you intel :non: 


you have a serious problem then. with my stock cooler, overclocked to 4.3GHz, my 3770k idles at 25c and my house temp is about 21c. my temps don't go above 70c. at stock speeds, i idle at the same temp but i don't go above 65c. all of these temp tests were tested by using prime 95 maximum heat test for 24 hours. i did the tests in a very small room though so after 24 hours it brought the room temp WAY up, causing the CPU temps to go up too.
February 6, 2013 4:53:45 AM

I must also have a serious problem. Using HeavyLoad stress testing software, I'm getting temps around 79C (peaked at 80c) coupled with a Zalman aftermarket heatsink/fan. Am wondering if it's a contact problem. Idle is a much cooler 28-32, however.
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February 6, 2013 5:11:40 AM

It most likely is. Are you running stock speeds? also, what's your specific heatsink model? Try removing your heatsink, wiping off the thermal paste with rubbing alcohol (nail polish remover works well too) and watch a couple tutorials on how much thermal paste to apply. There are many different methods, but it will give you a general idea of how much to put on. I personally use about a grain of rice sized amount and then I put some pressure on the heatsink (not much though) to spread out the paste and then I slide the heatsink around a little bit on the CPU to spread it some more. This always seems to work great for me.

Here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fRRWbQUqW1Y after you apply the thermal paste just move the heatsink around a bit to create the thinnest most spread out layer you can possibly make. Also, you should use intel xtreme tuning utility or Prime 95 to test your CPU temps. You should use coretemp or realtemp to monitor your temps as well. some programs can give false readings.
February 6, 2013 5:18:24 AM

Thanks! I edited my post just as soon as you posted. ;)  This is not OC'd, so that does seem excessively high for max load. I'm using Intel Desktop Utilities to monitor coupled with CPUID Hardware monitor (typically only showing about a degree in difference). Is there anything wrong with HeavyLoad's CPU stressing approach? I'll look into those other apps.

I actually transferred this heatsink from an older build (Quad 2 Core), so it's possible it needs to be better cleaned for more complete contact.

Almost forgot, heatsink model is ZALMAN CNPS9500.
February 11, 2013 11:48:26 PM

Update on my situation: Had it reseated and connected another outflow fan on the side of the case. Intel Desktop Utilities showed a peak of 62C, which is much more manageable (CPUID Hardware Monitor showed a "Package" peak of 63C, with one of the cores peaking at 64). These were the values over the course of an hour with HeavyLoad running the system at its peak. It gets much warmer here (high desert) in the summer, so it'll be interesting to see how high it'll go then (I hope not beyond 70).
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February 12, 2013 5:02:58 PM

That seems a bit better but still a little high. As long as you don't get past 85c you have absolutely nothing to worry about, but that still is a little high. If you want to get extremely brave, check out this thread. I really do not recommend it if you're not a professional but I thought it was pretty cool. I can confirm it helps a lot if done properly. My friend did this and dropped his temps about 10c on each core.
February 12, 2013 5:10:46 PM

Yea, I have past experience with building but had someone else install this bad boy since I have a tendinitis and I'm also a nervous wreck. :)  Was there supposed to be a link in your post? I'm not seeing it.
a b à CPUs
February 12, 2013 5:15:43 PM

I don't see the link either but I bet it involves "de-lidding" the CPU to put the cooler in direct contact with the chip. No thanks!
a b à CPUs
February 13, 2013 3:44:31 AM

Oops sorry. hardforum.com/showthread.php?p=1039005901 . You're close. Taking and leaving the heatspreader would cause heatsinks to not come into full contact with the cpu. What this guy does (and many others are doing) is taking the hood off the cpu and reapplying the cheap and crappy thermal paste that intel used for their ivy bridge cpus. The reasons why ivy bridge has bad temps is because 1. Crappy paste instead of solder. 2. Crappy application job. 3. Because its not soldered on, the heat spreader can sometimes not make full contact with the cpu. The most common reasons why people such as yourself get high temps is because of reason 1 and 2. When 1 or 2 of your cores are running 10c+ hotter than the rest, its reason 3 (thats what the guy in the thread had, up to 100c on a core on stock speed). Its actually pretty easy to remove the hood of the cpu and reapply paste. You should check out the video in his thread even if you dont consider it at all. Its really cool.

Sorry for bad grammar. I'm on my phone I cant be bothered. :lol: 
February 13, 2013 3:50:21 AM

Fascinating! Didn't know Intel took manufacturing shortcuts with this generation of chips. Will definitely be leaning towards AMD on next build/update.
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February 13, 2013 12:26:21 PM

I don't think Intel will be cheaping out again next generation because they had to deal with a lot of RMAs because of the HS not making proper contact with some of the CPU cores. Wait and see before you make any official choices because Intel is still ahead in performance with 90% of programs while using much less power.
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