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Should a CPU lift off MB socket without moving arm?

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May 21, 2012 3:28:20 PM

Hey guys...im trying to fix my computer. I built this thing around 6-7 years ago...P4, Abit IC7-G MB, 8gig RAM, ATI Radeon 9800 Pro, SATA HD, Antec 480W PSU.

Sparing the long story, my computer recently would intermittently restart itself, at any given time even during startup. I took the heatsink off for the firs time since I built it, and the P4 came out with the heatsink, attached. The arm on the MB that locks down the CPU was in the unlocked position, so I thought maybe this is what may be causing the issue. I clean everything, put some Arctic silver on, tightened everything back up and tried it again.

This time, I get no video at all. No post, no beeps, all fans running. I reset CMOS, tried all the ram sticks individually, disconnected everything, still no video output...the monitor will actually turn off from no signal.

Figured I would re-seat the P4 again. The P4 came out with the heatsink again, and the CPU socket arm was closed this time...so the P4 somehow came out from the socket with the arm locked down.

I know this isnt normal, but have you guys heard of this happening? And how would it come out of the socket with the arm locked? Any other info on this is great...im guessing this might be an issue.
a c 105 à CPUs
May 21, 2012 3:52:52 PM

Actually, although not normal (and definately not by design), the CPU coming up with the HSF is not unheard of. The CPU will usually survive the removal but it is very important to check to ensure no pins were bent.
It comes out of the socket even locked because of the seal created by the thermal compound (BTW, it also means you did a good job with the TIM) along with the fact that the clamping mechanism isn't the most secure to begin with. When removing a cooler (or even the CPU) it is suggested to twist the HSF a few times in both directions before attempting to lift it off the CPU (it breaks the seal created by the TIM).
a b à CPUs
May 21, 2012 4:04:48 PM

No this shouldn't happen at all Just make sure your socket and CPU is fine. First you would open the Arm, then re-seat the CPU. Make sure the CPU is seated properly and then lower and lock the Arm down. After that install the heatsink. There should be no issue at all when you do this except when there is problems.
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