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Heatsink for Gigabyte A75M-D2H

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February 9, 2012 8:43:03 PM

Can you recommend an aftersales heatsink that will fit in a Gigabyte A75M-D2H (not the UD2H)?

The problem is that the memory slots are too close to the CPU slot so the dimensions of the cooler must be limited.

I was forced to use the one that comes with the CPU and I am hoping for something that sounds less like a chopper... :D 
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February 9, 2012 9:37:28 PM

I would think the CoolerMaster Hyper 212+ or Hyper 212 Evo would fit. They are pretty big but more tall than wide and are not known to block memory slots.

You can always just buy low profile memory. GSkill Ripjaws X and low profile Corsair Vengance both will fit under the larger air coolers. My Scythe Mugen 2 covers 2 slots on my board but the GSkill Ripjaws X fits under it. You just have to put the memory in before you install the cooler.
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February 9, 2012 10:03:29 PM

Actually, Corsair Vengeance 1600C9 is the memory I have.

How about Xigmatek Gaia (120(W) x 50(D) x 159(H) mm) then which is about the same height as your Mugen 2(130 x 100 x 158mm)?

Dimensions taken from newegg....
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February 9, 2012 11:55:46 PM

You have the low profile Vengance? The normal stuff is too tall and will hit the big air coolers.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

If you have regular Vengance you might be limited to the Hyper 212+/212 Evo. Those are good coolers so thats not necessarily a bad thing.

Actually the Gaia might work too. It's only half as deep as my Mugen, 50 vs 100. Depth is what you are looking for as far as covering memory slots. The Gaia is actually smaller than the Hyper 212.
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February 10, 2012 12:57:58 AM

I have the Gaia with G Skill RAM with the high heat spreaders and it fits, so I think you will be OK.

But...

I also have an H100 water cooler. What I have found in using the two is this:

1) Air is a bit cheaper but water cools better
2) Factory sealed units are tooo easy to install compared to an air cooler
3) Water units put less stress on the mobo
4) You don't need to buy and apply extra thermal grease for the water units (paste is high quality and pre applied for water coolers)
5) Water units allow better air flow through the case which lowers temps even more.

If you have the budget or are just worried about space, I would recommend any of the Corsair H Series coolers. These are two options:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

or if you have space,

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

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February 10, 2012 3:43:07 AM

vollman1 said:
I have the Gaia with G Skill RAM with the high heat spreaders and it fits, so I think you will be OK.

But...

I also have an H100 water cooler. What I have found in using the two is this:

1) Air is a bit cheaper but water cools better
2) Factory sealed units are tooo easy to install compared to an air cooler
3) Water units put less stress on the mobo
4) You don't need to buy and apply extra thermal grease for the water units (paste is high quality and pre applied for water coolers)
5) Water units allow better air flow through the case which lowers temps even more.

If you have the budget or are just worried about space, I would recommend any of the Corsair H Series coolers. These are two options:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

or if you have space,

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...



You are comparing a low end air cooler to a very expensive "sort of" water cooler. If you look at any of the reviews you have to move up to the expensive and loud H100 to equal the performance of the higher end air coolers. If you want to exceed air cooler performance you need a real custom water loop. Really the only reason to have one is if you don't have room in your case for air. It's simple thermodynamics. Just compare the surface area of the closed loop coolers radiator to the surface area of a big air cooler.

All the big air coolers come with backplates making motherboard stress a moot point.

Almost every air cooler comes with it's own thermal paste. Some of it very good.

Closed loop coolers actually impede case airflow due to their need to intake air where air should be exhausting.

The $30 Hyper 212 beats the $75 H50 in every test including noise.


http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten...



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February 10, 2012 3:49:29 AM

anort3 said:
You are comparing a low end air cooler to a very expensive "sort of" water cooler. If you look at any of the reviews you have to move up to the expensive and loud H100 to equal the performance of the higher end air coolers. If you want to exceed air cooler performance you need a real custom water loop. Really the only reason to have one is if you don't have room in your case for air. It's simple thermodynamics. Just compare the surface area of the closed loop coolers radiator to the surface area of a big air cooler.

All the big air coolers come with backplates making motherboard stress a moot point.

Almost every air cooler comes with it's own thermal paste. Some of it very good.

Closed loop coolers actually impede case airflow due to their need to intake air where air should be exhausting.

The $30 Hyper 212 beats the $75 H50 in every test including noise.


http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten...



First...

Feb 07, 2011... is that the date on this review?

Second,

who is recommending the H70?
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February 10, 2012 3:56:34 AM

And have the closed loop coolers changed since then? Nope. Here is a review from November.

http://www.anandtech.com/show/5054/corsair-hydro-series...

Did I say you were recommending an H70? i just compared a $30 air cooler to an inferior $75 closed loop cooler.
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February 10, 2012 4:02:55 AM

anort3 said:
And have the closed loop coolers changed since then? Nope. Here is a review from November.

http://www.anandtech.com/show/5054/corsair-hydro-series...

Did I say you were recommending an H70? i just compared a $30 air cooler to an inferior $75 closed loop cooler.



Well....

the review was on the H70. Did you read it?

And...

Did you read the anandtech review? Because it seems to conclude the H100 is "recommended."

Water cools better than air.
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February 10, 2012 4:13:39 AM

The review that you posted also states in the conclusion (above the picture):

"...installation of the Corsair water block is substantially easier than that of the Silver Arrow—and that’s assuming you have a motherboard and case with sufficient clearance to begin with. There’s also the lingering question of whether it’s a good idea to have 1.2kg of weight hanging from your motherboard. Considering all of this, while coolers like the Silver Arrow can certainly be competitive, there’s still plenty of reason to consider Corsair’s Hydro series coolers."

So...

I am not sure what you are really trying to point out to us.
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February 10, 2012 4:15:40 AM

vollman1 said:
Well....

the review was on the H70. Did you read it?

And...

Did you read the anandtech review? Because it seems to conclude the H100 is "recommended."

Water cools better than air.



The review was to show a mid grade air cooler ( the Coolermaster V6 ) beating a closed loop water cooler.

The H100 is recommended but to quote the same article:

" With high-end air-coolers delivering near-H100 performance at a lower price, it's definitely a hard sell, but the H100 still easily gets our recommendation as a more versatile cooling solution. "

And to quote my recommendation above:

" Really the only reason to have one is if you don't have room in your case for air. "

I fail to see how the two statements are at odds with each other.

Water does cool better than air. That does not apply with the closed loop coolers however since they only use water to transport heat to the radiator. Like I said above it's thermodynamics. Surface area is what determines how well the coolers compare. Notice that the H100 is as big as a big air cooler. It just moves the surface area to another part of your case. Air cooling just removes the middleman that being the water.

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February 10, 2012 4:19:00 AM

The whole argument is moot anyway since the OP was asking for something quiet. Why would he spend $100 on an H100 that's louder than his stock cooling?
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February 10, 2012 4:24:18 AM

Do I have to point out (again) the date of the review?

And what prices do they list for August 7, 2011? (if you haven't read it all the prices are on the first page where they list the stats)

If you are in the USA, prices have fallen by about 15-20% on the H series coolers since the article was written.

And even with the higher dated prices, they still are recommended over air coolers.
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February 10, 2012 4:27:44 AM

If its a budget issue, air is the way to go.

But...

If the OP wants performance, the newer Corsair coolers are the way to go for all the reasons that I mentioned and more.

Edit:

The only thing I hear in my case is my video card. The H100 is on low fan speed and keeps my 4.5 OC at ~60'C under full load.
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February 10, 2012 4:51:46 AM

anort3 said:
You have the low profile Vengance? The normal stuff is too tall and will hit the big air coolers.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

If you have regular Vengance you might be limited to the Hyper 212+/212 Evo. Those are good coolers so thats not necessarily a bad thing.

Actually the Gaia might work too. It's only half as deep as my Mugen, 50 vs 100. Depth is what you are looking for as far as covering memory slots. The Gaia is actually smaller than the Hyper 212.



This is the one I have.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I just realized that the heat spreaders might be a problem too....

I will try the Gaia today and see what happens.

As far as water cooling is concerned, don't you think that it would be a bit of overkill for an A8-3850?
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February 10, 2012 4:57:05 AM

not the H60
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February 11, 2012 10:36:32 AM

There is no way that anything with the fan to the side of the memory will fit.

What I need in my case is a heatsink with the fan on top, just like the factory one.
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February 11, 2012 3:15:34 PM

This is exactly why they make low profile memory.

Even the aftermarket coolers with the fan on top are wider than the stock heatsink/fan.

You may be stuck with one of the H series of coolers. The bad news with that is only the $120 H100 is anything approaching quiet so any of the lower cost versions defeat your purpose. Or you could save $50 by getting 8GB of low profile Corsair Vengance or GSkill Ripjaws X for $46 and a Hyper 212 for $30.
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February 11, 2012 9:16:38 PM

vollman1 said:
On second thought, something like this would be better for that board:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

or,

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...



I thought about those as well but they overhang more than the stock cooler. If you read the reviews people still say they block memory slots. They are more for a MicroATX case where the height of the cooler is the problem.

It's the Corsair Vengance that's the problem. When it first came out I would not even recommend it for anyone with aftermarket air cooling and I have used Corsair for years. The GSkill Ripjaws and Ripjaws X both fit under the big coolers with no problems and Corsair has finally started getting quite a few different low profile Vengance kits on the market.
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February 12, 2012 9:00:05 AM

anort3 said:
This is exactly why they make low profile memory.

Even the aftermarket coolers with the fan on top are wider than the stock heatsink/fan.

You may be stuck with one of the H series of coolers. The bad news with that is only the $120 H100 is anything approaching quiet so any of the lower cost versions defeat your purpose. Or you could save $50 by getting 8GB of low profile Corsair Vengance or GSkill Ripjaws X for $46 and a Hyper 212 for $30.



It's funny that none of the geniuses at Corsair HQs (or anywhere else) have actually considered to design a heatsink with the same dimensions and shape as the factory one, just with better materials :D 

Note to myself: found a company that manufactures just that, and put them all out of business :sol: 
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February 14, 2012 8:16:24 AM

What if I switch the side of the heatsink fan so it does not get blocked by the RAM chips?

The only drawback I can think of is that in this case it will be face-to-face with the back case fan with an opposite air flow.

Is that a very bad thing?
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February 14, 2012 3:40:29 PM

kouroubel said:
What if I switch the side of the heatsink fan so it does not get blocked by the RAM chips?

The only drawback I can think of is that in this case it will be face-to-face with the back case fan with an opposite air flow.

Is that a very bad thing?



No no, if you have the fan on that side of the heatsink you would use it in a pull configuration so it would blow air to the case exhaust fans thus pulling air through the heatsink. Many people use 2 fans in a push/pull configuration and that generally helps get even lower temps than a single fan on an air cooler. A single fan pulling air would not cool as efficiently as a single fan pushing air but I would imagine it would still be better than stock cooling.
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February 15, 2012 7:23:16 AM

Best answer selected by kouroubel.
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February 15, 2012 1:59:19 PM

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