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PC cycling power

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February 11, 2012 1:29:18 AM

Here is my system:
i5 2500k (standard clock)
8gb gskill ripjaws (2x4gb 1600mhz ddr3)
Gigabyte GA-Z68X-UD3H-B3
GeForce GTX460 SC
Corsair TX750

I recently have had a problem where I turn on the computer, the pc starts for 1 second (approximately) then shuts off. Then turns itself back on, posts, shows the bios splash and then shuts down again. It will then repeat this exact pattern over and over again until I disconnect power.

This happened once before (I assumed my case was shorting the mobo somewhere) and I took everything out and bench ran it. It booted up fine and ran so I put everything back and it worked for about a month.

Now it has happened again. I took everything out and bench ran it, but it is still cycling power.

Here are the steps I have done to diagnose a problem and I don't know what it is (these are all being bench tested):
1. Bench run the system
2. disconnected the ram (mobo beeps)
3. changed out heatsink and fan
4. tested psu by jumpering the green wire to ground (it stays on continuously)
5. tried a different working psu (still cycles power)
6. reseated cpu
7. removed cpu (system powered for like .5 secs then shut off)
8. jumpered the power button contacts
9. removed everything but ram, cpu and hdd


Is my mobo fried? Do I need to get a new case so this doesn't happen again? Can this type of thing be RMA'd?

Any help would be much appreciated.

More about : cycling power

a b B Homebuilt system
February 11, 2012 1:37:50 AM

You've performed enough troubleshooting steps to confirm that the problem is board-related. If it's boot cycling while breadboarded w/2nd PSU, I'd feel safe in assuming it's the motherboard. If it's too late to RMA it, maybe Gigabyte will accept it for replacement or repair. But you'll be without a board for quite awhile...
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a c 78 B Homebuilt system
February 11, 2012 1:53:52 AM

I have seen a computer that would do the same thing every time you touched it the wrong way.

Without fail every time it was worked on in the inside like replacing the PSU or something it would have this problem.

The fix every time was just to push hard on the RAM and it would start working again.
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Related resources
February 11, 2012 2:19:21 AM

clutchc said:
You've performed enough troubleshooting steps to confirm that the problem is board-related. If it's boot cycling while breadboarded w/2nd PSU, I'd feel safe in assuming it's the motherboard. If it's too late to RMA it, maybe Gigabyte will accept it for replacement or repair. But you'll be without a board for quite awhile...



That's what i'm figuring too. I think Microcenter only has a 30 day return policy which I'm past but Gigabyte has a 3 year warranty which should be covered.

I hope it was just a bad board and something else isn't frying it.
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a b B Homebuilt system
February 11, 2012 2:31:59 AM

jtnova13 said:
That's what i'm figuring too. I think Microcenter only has a 30 day return policy which I'm past but Gigabyte has a 3 year warranty which should be covered.

I hope it was just a bad board and something else isn't frying it.

Bad boards are the most common failure point in new builds. As you would expect, since everything goes through the mother board. I've had my share.
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February 11, 2012 2:33:05 AM

have you tried resetting cmos by taking the battery out and leaving the mobo without power for 30 secs. if it boots up, reflash your bios just to be safe.
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February 11, 2012 2:52:44 AM

blackmancer said:
have you tried resetting cmos by taking the battery out and leaving the mobo without power for 30 secs. if it boots up, reflash your bios just to be safe.


I will try that in the morning. I did do that the last time this happened which didn't fix it but i'll try again.
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a b B Homebuilt system
February 11, 2012 3:02:27 AM

If you do as Blackmancer suggests, you can also jumper the CLR CMOS pins for 5 seconds and the BIOS will be reset to default. It's a bit surer than waiting for the capacitor to discharge. But same result.
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a c 78 B Homebuilt system
February 11, 2012 3:48:19 AM

BTW, Clutchc, I would rate the RAM and the PSUs as more often the points of failure in new computers instead of motherboards.

It would definitely make sense to try playing around with the RAM before you go RMAing things at this point.

Try it with just 1 stick and try it in each slot, then try the other one in each slot.

- edit - Dont forget to push hard on it like I said before.
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a b B Homebuilt system
February 11, 2012 2:31:02 PM

Raiddinn said:
BTW, Clutchc, I would rate the RAM and the PSUs as more often the points of failure in new computers instead of motherboards.

It would definitely make sense to try playing around with the RAM before you go RMAing things at this point.

Try it with just 1 stick and try it in each slot, then try the other one in each slot.

- edit - Dont forget to push hard on it like I said before.

I probably should have said 'seem to be the most common' instead of saying 'are the most common'. In my experience, at least.
I've assembled quite a few new systems over the years and never (yet) had anything DOA except boards. Although I did have other components fail after being in use.
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February 12, 2012 8:02:01 PM

Update:

I RMA'd the board because I took my PSU and RAM and slapped them onto my old mobo. Powers up fine (i'm posting from the PC now).

My motherboard must have failed sometime in the past month or so.
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a b B Homebuilt system
February 12, 2012 8:46:49 PM

Update:
I can now add my first new DOA graphics card to the list of motherboards I've had to send back. I'm assembling a SFF gamer and the card lasted through the O/S installation, the updates... but failed in the first 40% of the Furmark bench test. (Temps remained at safe levels)
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a c 78 B Homebuilt system
February 12, 2012 9:22:54 PM

More like you destroyed your video card on day 1. Furmark does that.

That is why Nvidia builds into their newest drivers code that will keep the video card from working at more than 50% while Furmark is running.

The manufacturer shouldn't have to pay for you blowing up your own video card with carlessness and I hope they don't. It clearly says in the Furmark website that this program can destroy good video cards and that sounds exactly like what happened to me.
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a b B Homebuilt system
February 13, 2012 12:21:10 AM

Raiddinn said:
More like you destroyed your video card on day 1. Furmark does that.

That is why Nvidia builds into their newest drivers code that will keep the video card from working at more than 50% while Furmark is running.

The manufacturer shouldn't have to pay for you blowing up your own video card with carlessness and I hope they don't. It clearly says in the Furmark website that this program can destroy good video cards and that sounds exactly like what happened to me.

Where do you come up with this stuff...
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a c 78 B Homebuilt system
February 13, 2012 5:55:24 PM

How about here

http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum/video-cards/45454-...

In that thread it talks about people using Furmark to destroy a video card on purpose so they can get another one for free with the warranty.

Those people aren't happy about it either in that thread.

Or how about here

http://www.geeks3d.com/20081124/furmark-150-graphics-ca...

Nice little comment from there "The win32 installer is the only simple solution I found to be sure that the user reads and accepts the EULA. Because FurMark is not a kind software: it can destroy your graphics card… VLC can’t kill your graphics card…

I’m sure there are some mirrors that host a zipped version of FurMark…"

And how about here

http://www.overclock.net/t/864322/truth-on-gtx580-furma...

As we all have learned at this point the GTX580 has both hardware and software (driver) influenced power monitoring features. As it detects high current usage, it will purpose cut the clocks by 50% to decrease consumption. This is not an issue for gamers but this has been an absolute headache for reviewers as most still could not unlock the full power of the card with applications like Furmark and OCCT.

Nvidia uses a new technology dubbed Advanced Power Management on the GTX 580. It is used for monitoring power consumption and performing power capping in order to protect the card from excessive power draw.

Dedicated hardware circuity on the GTX 580 graphics card performs real time monitoring of current and voltage. The graphics driver monitors the power levels and will dynamically adjust performance in certain stress appllications such as FurMark and OCCT if power levels axceed the cards spec.

Power monitoring adjust performance only if power specs are exceeded and if the application is one of the apps Nvidia has defined in their driver to monitor such as FurMark and OCCT. This should not significantly affect gaming performance, and Nvidia indeed claims that no game so far has managed to wake this mechanism from its slumber. For now, it is not possible to turn off power capping.


So yes, everything I said is factual and you 99% likely did blow up a perfectly good card by doing something stupid.
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a b B Homebuilt system
February 13, 2012 6:23:11 PM

I suppose every forum has to have one...
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a c 78 B Homebuilt system
February 13, 2012 6:33:04 PM

Where I am from, if people break something they pay for it themselves, not go around asking other people to pay for it. Take some personal responsibility.

I guess every forum has to have someone like that on it.

Not like all this stuff isn't well known by people that have some idea what is going on in the world of computers.

The last thing we need are people on here using Furmark because you are doing it and they blow up their cards too.

Sorry if its not sugar coated enough for you, but you are indirectly hurting other people and it is not cool and I don't condone that.
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a b B Homebuilt system
February 13, 2012 7:19:44 PM

Will you please go bother someone else
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a c 78 B Homebuilt system
February 13, 2012 7:28:01 PM

Don't go around making a big deal about how you are indirectly harming others and NP.
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March 13, 2012 1:17:30 AM

Ok. I got my mobo back from gigabyte. I put everything together and it is STILL CYCLING POWER. This time it will not post at all.

After reading some more about others problems with this same mobo I am beginning to think this is a bios issue. It has to be something else if GB sent me back the same board.

What are the chances of 2 RAM sticks going bad after like 1 month of use?

How could my CPU die after 1 month I never OC, never seen the temps get above maybe 40C. My PSU works fine, i was running it for the past month on a backup PC.


I took my CMOS battery out and I am going to reinstall it tomorrow. I am too tired/frustrated to work on it anymore tonight.

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