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HDMI vs. VGA

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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December 12, 2011 5:49:56 PM

I just set-up my 32 inch Vizio tv with a native resolution of 1366x768 will there be a noticeable difference between hdmi and vga?

Graphics card is geforce gts 450

More about : hdmi vga

a b U Graphics card
December 12, 2011 5:56:56 PM

Yes audio can pass through the hdmi so it is a little more simple to avoid the extra cables. The video will be the same.
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December 12, 2011 5:57:38 PM

it's better to use HDMI as it's more advanced
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a b U Graphics card
December 12, 2011 5:57:38 PM

HDMI also carries sound, but you shouldn't notice a difference in picture quality.
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December 12, 2011 5:58:07 PM

spentshells said:
Yes audio can pass through the hdmi so it is a little more simple to avoid the extra cables. The video will be the same.


Is it pretty significant or just a little noticeable?
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a b U Graphics card
December 12, 2011 6:01:07 PM

having 1 cable instead of 3 is just a lot easier so I recommend using the HDMI
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a c 216 U Graphics card
December 12, 2011 6:08:03 PM

If you don't use the sound from the TV, then the only difference is HDMI uses a digital signal instead of analog. Digital is better, but most people cannot see a difference, even side by side.

If you don't use the TV's sound and don't have a HDMI cable already, just use your VGA cable, but if you have both, or have to buy 1 to get it to work, get an HDMI cable.
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a b U Graphics card
December 12, 2011 6:14:39 PM

OK, the other thing everybody did not mention here, IS resolution. IE, my SONY TV only has a max 1280 x 768 resolution on VGA, but goes up to 1080i on HDMi
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a b U Graphics card
December 12, 2011 6:27:05 PM

HDMI is superior - Digital picture = crisp picture.

VGA - Analog signal - not exactly a clear picture.

Use HDMI over VGA - its just better in every way possible.
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a c 171 U Graphics card
December 12, 2011 6:38:40 PM

Best reason I can think of to use DVI/HDMI over VGA in this case would be the digital connection would allow HDCP content to be played. This is important in your case as its hooked up to a TV.

Fewer cables isn't a big thing for me. You hook it up once (usually) and your done with that. Picture quality could matter, but as mentioned it can be hard for most to tell the difference. I'd pick the HDMI for bigger res and able to play encrypted content.
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December 12, 2011 6:52:24 PM

Well I been told it can't go higher than the native resolution, although on the specs it list 1920x1080 for computer support. Right now I am using VGA and only get the native resolution of 1366x768
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a b U Graphics card
December 12, 2011 8:06:35 PM

The maximum resolution supported by your television is 1366x768 that is what will be displayed unless you force 1080 then you will need to scroll around which is a HUGE pain in the butt. i've done this.
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a c 216 U Graphics card
December 12, 2011 8:39:32 PM

spentshells said:
The maximum resolution supported by your television is 1366x768 that is what will be displayed unless you force 1080 then you will need to scroll around which is a HUGE pain in the butt. i've done this.


It's only possible to go beyond specs with a CRT, LCD monitors native resolution is their max resolution.
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a b U Graphics card
December 12, 2011 8:47:06 PM

With 720p VGA is fine, as HDMI doesn't add very much to the picture quality in 720p. 1080p though you would want HDMI, as the more information needed in 1080p gets transfered better with HDMI than VGA.
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a b U Graphics card
December 12, 2011 8:56:41 PM

bystander said:
It's only possible to go beyond specs with a CRT, LCD monitors native resolution is their max resolution.


That is not true you simply can not view the entire screen at once. You can use the higher resolution in windows you simply can not view it all at once try it out it sucks but it is possible.
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a c 216 U Graphics card
December 12, 2011 9:09:46 PM

spentshells said:
That is not true you simply can not view the entire screen at once. You can use the higher resolution in windows you simply can not view it all at once try it out it sucks but it is possible.


Well, that is not increasing the resolution. You are increasing the desktop size beyond your resolution. You still have a view resolution exactly the same as normal. I've done it in the past, but that is not increasing your resolution, just to be clear.

CRT's actually allow you to go beyond their max resolution, although it's not recommended as it's possible to damage it, or at least that is what they say.
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a b U Graphics card
December 12, 2011 9:17:55 PM

It actually is increasing the resolution.
Go into properties and change it right now... tell me what settings you changed and then repeat again this is not changing the resolution.

I never once said the resolution of the screen can be increased.
But when Changing the amount of pixels for the desktop is in fact changing the resolution.
Like it or not that is in fact what the setting is called.
it is in fact changing the amount pixels the screen will display just not all at once.
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a c 216 U Graphics card
December 12, 2011 9:36:28 PM

spentshells said:
It actually is increasing the resolution.
Go into properties and change it right now... tell me what settings you changed and then repeat again this is not changing the resolution.

I never once said the resolution of the screen can be increased.
But when Changing the amount of pixels for the desktop is in fact changing the resolution.
Like it or not that is in fact what the setting is called.
it is in fact changing the amount pixels the screen will display just not all at once.


I can't even tell you want they call it, as I can't increase the "resolution" beyond 1080p. What ever, it's just semantics with what you are talking about. You can't increase DPI (no way to get confused here, right?), and that technique only works on the desktop, not in fullscreen gaming.
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a c 171 U Graphics card
December 12, 2011 9:43:56 PM

DPI is way different then resolution. Differences in DPI is what gives us 23" 1080 screens and 55" 1080 screens.

What shells is talking about is semi correct. When you "increase the res" it would be more appropriate to say you are "increasing the viewing res". (the setting he is talking about that is.) We call it res just to make it simple. I've done whats beig talked about on my 480 TV. Yes, you have to scroll around to see the whole window. But you are only looking at a 640x480 "window" of it at any time. There is no way to change that.

As bystander said, I can't increase the res beyond what my LCD can do. In CCC it only allows me to go up to the max of my monitor. Not sure why my CRT allowed this and my LCD doesn't.
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a c 216 U Graphics card
December 12, 2011 10:14:23 PM

4745454b said:
DPI is way different then resolution. Differences in DPI is what gives us 23" 1080 screens and 55" 1080 screens.

What shells is talking about is semi correct. When you "increase the res" it would be more appropriate to say you are "increasing the viewing res". (the setting he is talking about that is.) We call it res just to make it simple. I've done whats beig talked about on my 480 TV. Yes, you have to scroll around to see the whole window. But you are only looking at a 640x480 "window" of it at any time. There is no way to change that.

As bystander said, I can't increase the res beyond what my LCD can do. In CCC it only allows me to go up to the max of my monitor. Not sure why my CRT allowed this and my LCD doesn't.


My guess is that 1080p is as high as that setting allows. Since I use a 1080p and I presume you do too, it's not available to go beyond 1080p. It's also possible it was dropped in Win 7 or even earlier. I haven't used that setting (or played with it rather) for many years.
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a b U Graphics card
December 12, 2011 10:40:53 PM

I concede.
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