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I5 2500k vs i5 3570k

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  • CPUs
  • Intel i5
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May 29, 2012 2:36:26 AM

I live in Canada, and the price difference between the two is 20$. I looked on the net and people are saying the 3570 has PCIe 3.0. Is it worth it in the long run to get? I would like to keep this computer for 5 - 7 years with minimal upgrading.

I do plan on overclocking to ~4.5 - 4.7

Antec EW 650W PSU
ASRock Z68 Extreme3 Gen3 MoBo
Corsair Vengeance 8Gb
OCZ Vertex 3 240Gb SSD
Antec Khuler 920 Liquid Cooling
HAF 932 Adv Case

Any opinions on what Graphics Card I should get? I don't want to bottleneck.

More about : 2500k 3570k

a c 186 à CPUs
May 29, 2012 2:58:12 AM

If you plan on overclocking, grab the 2500k.
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a c 283 à CPUs
May 29, 2012 3:37:56 AM

If you're dead set on a 4.5 to 4.7 OC, go with the 2500K. The 3570K will get very hot at 4.5 and even though you plan on using a pretty good cooler (regardless of the fact that I have an extreme dislike of closed loop water cooling), 4.5 will be at the edge of what's comfortably feasible, IMO. You MIGHT be able to squeeze out 4.6 or 4.7 with a 3570K on that cooler, but I wouldn't go into it thinking it's a guarantee.
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a b à CPUs
May 29, 2012 3:56:33 AM

Get the i5-2500k. ;) 
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a b à CPUs
May 29, 2012 3:58:55 AM

pretty sure any graphics card thats capable of saturating a pci-e 2.0 x16 lane will be bottlenecked by that cpu. ie, pci-e 3.0 in these new systems is next to useless
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May 29, 2012 4:02:28 AM

DJDeCiBeL said:
If you're dead set on a 4.5 to 4.7 OC, go with the 2500K. The 3570K will get very hot at 4.5 and even though you plan on using a pretty good cooler (regardless of the fact that I have an extreme dislike of closed loop water cooling), 4.5 will be at the edge of what's comfortably feasible, IMO. You MIGHT be able to squeeze out 4.6 or 4.7 with a 3570K on that cooler, but I wouldn't go into it thinking it's a guarantee.



I read up on that the IB at 4.2 Ghz, for example, runs more efficiently than the 2500k at 4.5.
Also, I am not dead set at 4.5Ghz I would prefer more future proof than anything else. I know, no such thing as future proof, but I don't want to hit my head against the wall 3 years down the line; having to shell out more cash because of something stupid like PCIe 3.0. (And what exactly is that? And does it really matter that much?)
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May 29, 2012 4:03:49 AM

Also, would the Asus p8z77-v MB be a better buy? This is my first computer build, and I want it to be perfect.
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a c 283 à CPUs
May 29, 2012 4:06:53 AM

mikemaravani said:
Also, would the Asus p8z77-v MB be a better buy? This is my first computer build, and I want it to be perfect.


If you go with the 3570K, then yeah, a Z77 would be a better choice (would need to flash the BIOS of a Z68 board with another compatible CPU to get the 3570K to work with it).
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a c 123 à CPUs
May 29, 2012 4:09:53 AM

i have my own concerns about the ivy cpu's and there use of paste rather than solder. reason being no matter how good the paste it will have a limited lifespan that could be much shorter than the solderd on heatplates of the sandy cpu's...
typically paste manufacturers recommend you replace the paste at least every 2.5 years as it will show signs of degradation by then.
now i know typical paste is exposed to the air during usage and the paste used in the ivy may not be, but will that make a difference in its lifespan...
maybe 1 of the pro's or even chris woods may be able to answer, what is the comparative lifespan of paste compared to the solder.
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a b à CPUs
May 29, 2012 4:36:19 AM

what's your budget for Graphics Card?
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May 29, 2012 4:37:14 AM

I decided to go with the 2500k.

But, it says on the i5 {Socket LGA1155} and on the MB
ASUS - Asus P8Z77-V LX Socket 1155
ASROCK- ASRock Z68 Extreme3 Gen3 Socket 1155

ASRock just says socket 1155 while ASUS has LX Socket, or is that -V LX? The 2500k is compatible with both boards, right?
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a c 283 à CPUs
May 29, 2012 4:39:24 AM

mikemaravani said:
I decided to go with the 2500k.

But, it says on the i5 {Socket LGA1155} and on the MB
ASUS - Asus P8Z77-V LX Socket 1155
ASROCK- ASRock Z68 Extreme3 Gen3 Socket 1155

ASRock just says socket 1155 while ASUS has LX Socket, or is that -V LX? The 2500k is compatible with both boards, right?


The LX is just the version of that board (Like mine is a P8Z68-V LE), nothing to do with the socket. But yes, the 2500K is compatible with both.
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May 29, 2012 4:49:13 AM

bigcyco1 said:
what's your budget for Graphics Card?



I've read that the amount you spend on your CPU is the amount you should spend on your GPU. Since i'm over clocking, I figured ~300 - 350$ But I might wait and order EVGA's 670, just don't want to put that much money onto a GPU and bottleneck.
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a c 283 à CPUs
May 29, 2012 4:51:05 AM

mikemaravani said:
I've read that the amount you spend on your CPU is the amount you should spend on your GPU. Since i'm over clocking, I figured ~300 - 350$ But I might wait and order EVGA's 670, just don't want to put that much money onto a GPU and bottleneck.


You won't bottle neck, on either side. You won't even need to OC the 2500K for a 670.
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May 29, 2012 5:02:31 AM

Best answer selected by mikemaravani.
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May 29, 2012 5:02:43 AM

Thank you for everyone's help!
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a c 283 à CPUs
May 29, 2012 5:04:22 AM

No problem! :) 
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May 29, 2012 5:25:53 AM

You can actually pretty much put as much cash as you want for graphics card with an i5-2500k, even a 690 (1000$) wouldn't be bottlenecked... and pci-e 3.0 is USELESS unless you run sli on two 8x lanes instead of two 16x. And even there, not that big a deal... With even the GTX 680 you wouldn't notice any difference between PCI-E 1.1 and 3.0...
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a c 146 à CPUs
May 29, 2012 11:07:25 AM

HEXiT said:
what is the comparative lifespan of paste compared to the solder.

Zinc/aluminum oxide, graphite and other common heat transfer powders have infinite lifespans. Where there may be problems is with the oil and other stuff added to turn the powders into something that can be applied from a convenient tube/syringe. Since the IHS is factory-applied, the stuff Intel uses likely has the bare minimum of fillers needed to make powder tacky and 'flowy' enough for mechanical application and would be nearly impossible to squeeze out of a tube/syringe.

Fancy pastes that use pure silver/copper/etc. nano-particles need additional filler materials to protect metal particles from oxidation.
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a b à CPUs
May 29, 2012 11:16:49 AM

mikemaravani said:
I live in Canada, and the price difference between the two is 20$. I looked on the net and people are saying the 3570 has PCIe 3.0. Is it worth it in the long run to get? I would like to keep this computer for 5 - 7 years with minimal upgrading.

I do plan on overclocking to ~4.5 - 4.7

Antec EW 650W PSU
ASRock Z68 Extreme3 Gen3 MoBo
Corsair Vengeance 8Gb
OCZ Vertex 3 240Gb SSD
Antec Khuler 920 Liquid Cooling
HAF 932 Adv Case

Any opinions on what Graphics Card I should get? I don't want to bottleneck.

Are you gaming? If so, a 3570k is a great way to go because after 4.4GHz, game don't gain much after that and plus 3750k have a low 1.1v despite the fact that it have high temp, what you could do is a DIY of changing the thermal paste inside but it's likely a risk but can also be easy to do...
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May 29, 2012 4:33:03 PM

legendkiller said:
Are you gaming? If so, a 3570k is a great way to go because after 4.4GHz, game don't gain much after that and plus 3750k have a low 1.1v despite the fact that it have high temp, what you could do is a DIY of changing the thermal paste inside but it's likely a risk but can also be easy to do...


Yes i'll be gaming. A little movie editing here and there, music... surfing the net.
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a b à CPUs
May 29, 2012 4:51:09 PM

Always buy the latest tech, the i5 3570k will reach 4.5Ghz, really easy and won't be bottlenecked by anything.
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a c 123 à CPUs
May 31, 2012 4:32:46 AM

InvalidError said:
Zinc/aluminum oxide, graphite and other common heat transfer powders have infinite lifespans. Where there may be problems is with the oil and other stuff added to turn the powders into something that can be applied from a convenient tube/syringe. Since the IHS is factory-applied, the stuff Intel uses likely has the bare minimum of fillers needed to make powder tacky and 'flowy' enough for mechanical application and would be nearly impossible to squeeze out of a tube/syringe.

Fancy pastes that use pure silver/copper/etc. nano-particles need additional filler materials to protect metal particles from oxidation.

thanx for the info...
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