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Linksys WCG200 & WRT54GL together

Last response: in Networking
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March 2, 2011 9:52:47 PM

Because the wireless on the WCG200 sucks so bad, i decided to just use it for the cable modem. I use the WRT54GL for the wireless around the house and just have it plugged into a port on the WCG200. I have my laptop, printer, and SAN all hard-wired into the WRT54GL. However, I want to be able to RDP into my laptop, and unless I have my laptop plugged into one of the ports on the WCG200, I can't remote in. Then if my laptop is plugged into the WCG200, I cant access my printer and SAN plugged into the WRT54GL. See my dilemma?!

So to diagram my setup:
INTERNET <---> WCG200 <---> WRT54GL (WiFi) <---> laptop, printer, SAN

Some other posts have suggested disabling the DHCP on the WRT54GL and forcing IP addresses to be picked up from the WCG200, but i'm not sure I understand how to do this. The WCG200 has an IP address picked up by my ISP, and the WRT54GL has an IP address picked up from the WCG200 (192.168.0.10).

Any suggestions would be really appreciative!! Take care.

More about : linksys wcg200 wrt54gl

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a b D Laptop
a c 79 F Wireless
March 2, 2011 10:38:42 PM

disconnect the WRT54GL from the WCG200

log into the WRT54GL and setup the wireless security.
then disable the DHCP and assign 192.168.0.253 as the LAN IP.
now connect one of the four LAN ports (NOT the WAN/Internet port) to the WCG200.

the WCG200 will provide the IP to the network devices via DHCP and the WRT54GL will use it's LAN IP to communicate to the wireless devices.
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a b D Laptop
a b F Wireless
March 2, 2011 10:52:39 PM

There are several ways to solve the problem.

The best way is to place the WCG200 in "bridge mode" (assuming it has this option, it's possible some devices don't), which demotes the combo router+modem to a simple modem. Now the WCG200 passes the public IP to your router's WAN port. Your router is solely responsible for routing, firewall, DHCP server, etc.

[wcg200 (bridge mode)](lan)<-- wire -->(wan)[wrt54gl]

If it doesn’t support bridge mode, then you can chain the routers, but do so LAN to LAN.

[wcg200](lan)<-- wire -->(lan)[wrt54gl (wap only)]

But now you need to disable the WRT54GL’s DHPC server and assign it a static IP address in the same subnet as the WCG200. The WRT54GL just becomes a WAP (wireless access point). Wireless clients are simply dropped on the WCG200’s subnet.

The biggest problem w/ the above is that you’re still stuck w/ the WCG200, when you may be more interested in using the WR54GL as your primary router (e.g., maybe you have dd-wrt on the WRT54GL). To solve this problem, you could connect the WCG200 to the WRT54GL, LAN to WAN, respectively.

[wcg200](lan)<-- wire -->(wan)[wrt54gl]

You then specify the IP assigned to the WAN port of the WRT54GL in the DMZ of the WCG200. This effectively bypasses the WCG200’s firewall (everything that hits the WCG200’s firewall is automatically forwarded to WRT54GL). Of course, it’s important the WAN IP of the WRT54GL uses a static/fixed IP so the DMZ never breaks. Plus you’ll want to disable wireless on the WCG200.

One of the “side benefits” of this last configuration is that you could use the WCG200 as a “guest” network. Anyone using the WCG200 directly (wire or wireless) is prevented from accessing the WRT54GL thanx to its firewall, yet they always have Internet access!
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March 3, 2011 2:59:19 AM

Emerald said:
disconnect the WRT54GL from the WCG200

log into the WRT54GL and setup the wireless security.
then disable the DHCP and assign 192.168.0.253 as the LAN IP.
now connect one of the four LAN ports (NOT the WAN/Internet port) to the WCG200.

the WCG200 will provide the IP to the network devices via DHCP and the WRT54GL will use it's LAN IP to communicate to the wireless devices.


Emerald, I'm curious as to why you set the WRT54GL LAN IP to 192.168.0.253? The WCG200 has a set range with .253 not within that range. Will this present an issue?

Thanks!
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a b D Laptop
a c 79 F Wireless
March 3, 2011 3:28:18 AM

some router have the DHCP range set from .2 to .254, or .1 to .253

By using .253 it will most likely never be handed out.

You would need over 250 devices connected to the router until the DHCP will try to hand out IP ending in .253

Even if your DHCP only hands out IPs from .50 to .100 the .253 will still communicate with your main router. DHCP only shows which IP addresses can be automatically assigned, all remaining unused IPs can be statically (manually) assigned.

as long as you are using a class C IP range with a Subnet Mask of 255.255.255.0 you can use 254 devices
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March 9, 2011 10:57:17 PM

I appreciate all the great answers. I'm not choosing one as a best answer, but simply the one i implemented and has worked out for me. tomshardware saves me again!!!
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March 9, 2011 10:57:30 PM

Best answer selected by heylarson.
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