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How many watts and what model?

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June 1, 2012 4:24:54 AM

-How many watts would I need for:
i7 3770k (none to some overclocking)
2x GTX 680s in SLI (none to some overclocking)
4-6 case fans
Z77 motherboard
Two monitors
2 SSDs, 1 Hybrid HDD/SSD and 2 HDDs (7200rpm)
I also plan to charge my phone, if that accounts for anything.

-According to those specs, what brand/model should I buy? As long as the quality of the PSU is good, price pretty much comes secondary for me.

-Also, what's the difference between "80+", "bronze", "gold" and "modular" psus?

More about : watts model

a b ) Power supply
a b K Overclocking
June 1, 2012 5:06:22 AM

In a modular PSU some or all of the cables are attached to the unit by you, rather than being permanently attached internally. This reduces cable clutter as you only attach the cables that you actually need.

You need a PSU with four PCIE connectors. A Corsair TX-750 or 750M (modular) will do very nicely.
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a b ) Power supply
a b K Overclocking
June 1, 2012 5:42:51 AM

Iamazn said:
-How many watts would I need for:
i7 3770k (none to some overclocking)
2x GTX 680s in SLI (none to some overclocking)
4-6 case fans
Z77 motherboard
Two monitors
2 SSDs, 1 Hybrid HDD/SSD and 2 HDDs (7200rpm)
I also plan to charge my phone, if that accounts for anything.

-According to those specs, what brand/model should I buy? As long as the quality of the PSU is good, price pretty much comes secondary for me.

-Also, what's the difference between "80+", "bronze", "gold" and "modular" psus?

Use this: http://extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp

And monitor is not needed to be taken into account because they take their power from the wall socket.
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a c 110 ) Power supply
a c 150 K Overclocking
June 1, 2012 5:50:29 AM

You're looking at a quality 750w psu.

I like the Corsair HX750W.
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June 1, 2012 6:59:24 AM

I think I'll get a 850w power supply just to be safe... What's a good 850w model?
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a b ) Power supply
a b K Overclocking
June 1, 2012 7:05:52 AM

Corsair HX850.
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a b ) Power supply
a b K Overclocking
June 1, 2012 9:36:04 AM

The AX is 80 Plus Gold while HX is Silver. Gold just means more efficient & also, the AX is fully modular, meaning all cables can be detached including the 24PIN & 8PIN which for HX is fixed.

If you can afford it, it does not hurt to be on the high side with regards to power supply.
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a c 139 ) Power supply
a b K Overclocking
June 1, 2012 9:44:39 AM

Iamazn said:
-Also, what's the difference between "80+", "bronze", "gold" and "modular" psus?
Modular PSUs allow you to detach any unused power cables and store them outside the case. Especially useful for small cases and can help keep the inside of a case looking more organized.

80 Plus program recognizes efficiency converting AC power to DC power for your PC parts. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/80_PLUS
It does not denote any special quality or reliability.
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a c 121 ) Power supply
a b K Overclocking
June 1, 2012 10:15:43 AM

WR2 said:
...80 Plus program recognizes efficiency converting AC power to DC power for your PC parts. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/80_PLUS
It does not denote any special quality or reliability.

True, but it does weed out the liar-labeled junk. Although 80+ tests at the unrealistically low temperature of 23C, they run the units at full labeled power for over half an hour. That may not seem like much, but it will kill Chokemax brand PSU-shaped objects. At worst, in real life, an 80+ certified PSU will be a little less efficient than what is claimed, but will still be capable of the full amount of wattage on its label.
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a c 121 ) Power supply
a b K Overclocking
June 1, 2012 10:27:45 AM

I'm referring only to those units actually tested by 80+; if Logisys slapped a fake 80+ label on one of their PSU-shaped objects, it would just mean that some high level decision-maker at the company needed to be put down for willful consumer fraud.
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a c 139 ) Power supply
a b K Overclocking
June 1, 2012 10:41:37 AM

I'm mostly referring to 80+ certified units that most of us would never recommend while there are better options in the same price range.
Like this Cooler Master GX 650W Power Supply
It's 80+ certified rating didn't 'rate' a passing grade from HardOCP.
IMO, 80+ does not denote any special quality or reliability (beyond the area or efficiency it certifies).
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a c 121 ) Power supply
a b K Overclocking
June 1, 2012 7:52:58 PM

Ah yes, another CM; I thought the summary for that one was rather humorous: "polished turd in a box," indeed.
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June 2, 2012 7:43:09 AM

-How much more efficient is Gold vs Silver? Is it enough to make a huge difference?
-I am thinking about getting the HX1050 over the 1200AX, because I think 1200 watts would be too much. Is the HX1050 fully modular?
-Is there a better 1000/1050w modular PSU that beats the HX1050?
-How many HDDs/SSDs/GPUs can the HX1050 support at once?
-If I were to keep my computer running 24/7 with a 1000 or 1050w psu, how much more would my electricity bill be?
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a c 121 ) Power supply
a b K Overclocking
June 2, 2012 3:00:12 PM

A PSU only consumes the power it needs to supply your computer components. If they need 400W, then that's all the PSU will provide, with any difference at the wall due to the efficiency of each PSU at that load.
Gold vs. Silver is only a 2% difference (at 115V). Contrast that with non-certified junk vs 80+, which may be over 10%.
The PSU sizing calculator at http://www.extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.js... will tell you how big a PSU you need for your components. I'd add 50W-100W to the suggestion in order to be operating in the middle of the PSU's range, where it is most efficient. Keep in mind though, that 100% of the time your PC is on, it isn't going to be pulling that full load (unless you are folding or mining when you aren't playing games).
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June 2, 2012 4:55:27 PM

Then I guess I'll get the HX1050.
Few questions about it:
-How many HDDs/SSDs/GPUs can the HX1050 support at once?
-What do the following mean: ATX connector, EPS connector, PCI-E connector, 4 pin Peripheral Connector, SATA connector, floppy connector
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a c 121 ) Power supply
a b K Overclocking
June 2, 2012 5:21:20 PM

ATX connector is probably the 24-pin main power connector (but see below). It was formerly 20-pin, so you may see the cable described as a 20+4 pin connector.
The EPS connector is an 8-pin connector for CPU power. Formerly 4-pin (in fact the term "ATX connector" may also be referring to the older 4-pin CPU power connector rather than the main power connector), it is sometimes a 4+4 pin cable, where you can use just 4 if that is all that is needed.
A PCIE power cable is a 6-pin (or 6+2 pin) power cable for video cards.
A 4-pin Peripheral Connector, sometimes called a Molex connector, is a thick 4-pin power connector for older optical and [IDE] hard drives.
A SATA power connector is the newer 15-pin flat power connector for modern hard drives and optical drives.
A floppy connector is a 4-pin power cable that has an end similar in size to a PWM fan's power cable. It is used for floppy drives, and some really old (e.g. AGP) video cards.
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June 2, 2012 6:13:09 PM

WR2 said:
30? 40? You'll run out of power connectors and case mounting locations long before you run out of power.

All about the various PC power supply cables and connectors
http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors....

I meant how many HDDs could be connected at once, before running out of connectors.

Onus said:
ATX connector is probably the 24-pin main power connector (but see below). It was formerly 20-pin, so you may see the cable described as a 20+4 pin connector.
The EPS connector is an 8-pin connector for CPU power. Formerly 4-pin (in fact the term "ATX connector" may also be referring to the older 4-pin CPU power connector rather than the main power connector), it is sometimes a 4+4 pin cable, where you can use just 4 if that is all that is needed.
A PCIE power cable is a 6-pin (or 6+2 pin) power cable for video cards.
A 4-pin Peripheral Connector, sometimes called a Molex connector, is a thick 4-pin power connector for older optical and [IDE] hard drives.
A SATA power connector is the newer 15-pin flat power connector for modern hard drives and optical drives.
A floppy connector is a 4-pin power cable that has an end similar in size to a PWM fan's power cable. It is used for floppy drives, and some really old (e.g. AGP) video cards.

So basically:
6x PCI-E connectors = Can run at least 2 video cards.
12x SATA connectors = Can run up to 12 SSDs or HDDs?
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a c 139 ) Power supply
a b K Overclocking
June 2, 2012 6:25:55 PM

It might be easier if you tell us enough details to not have to guess.

Which motherboard? How many PCI-e x16 slots usually determines how many video cards can be squeezed into the system.

The motherboard also determines the number of SATA/eSata ports for HDD/SSD/ODD devices. And there are external USB drives and possible PCie expansion cards with extra SATA/eSATA ports.
You can usually add extra power connectors, either by daisy chaining or y-split cables.
Case choice can determine how many HDD/SDD/ODD devices can be installed as well.
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June 2, 2012 8:16:58 PM

WR2 said:
It might be easier if you tell us enough details to not have to guess.

Which motherboard? How many PCI-e x16 slots usually determines how many video cards can be squeezed into the system.

The motherboard also determines the number of SATA/eSata ports for HDD/SSD/ODD devices. And there are external USB drives and possible PCie expansion cards with extra SATA/eSATA ports.
You can usually add extra power connectors, either by daisy chaining or y-split cables.
Case choice can determine how many HDD/SDD/ODD devices can be installed as well.

I haven't decided on a motherboard yet... I'm looking for one that supports SLI and has multiple SATA III/6GBs slots. For my case, it's the CM Storm Trooper and as far as I know, it can support 10+ SSDs/HDDs.
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a c 139 ) Power supply
a b K Overclocking
June 2, 2012 9:04:14 PM

CM Storm Trooper:
A top front panel 2.5” HDD/SDD hot-swap docking bay
3 external 5.25" ODD drive bays
Two 3.5" HDD cages with 4 HDDs per cage.
And the lower 4 bay 2.5" SSD cage

I make that out to be about 16 HDD/SSD/ODD drives if you max the case out.
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June 2, 2012 9:07:34 PM

WR2 said:
CM Storm Trooper:
A top front panel 2.5” HDD/SDD hot-swap docking bay
3 external 5.25" ODD drive bays
Two 3.5" HDD cages with 4 HDDs per cage.
And the lower 4 bay 2.5" SSD cage

I make that out to be about 16 HDD/SSD/ODD drives if you max the case out.

Would the HX1050 have enough connectors to support 6 (3 ssd, 2 hdd)
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a c 139 ) Power supply
a b K Overclocking
June 2, 2012 9:24:34 PM

HX1050 has 12x SATA power connectors.
-> Keep an eye out on that $15 off w/ promo code EMCNEHA36, ends 6/4
Takes the price down to $190, or about $25 more than HX 850.

HX 850 also has 12 x SATA power connectors and would have plenty of power for the system you're sketching out.
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June 3, 2012 3:00:16 AM

-On the HX1050, which connectors AREN'T modular?
-Are there any other ~1000w FULLY modular PSUs that I should consider?
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a c 121 ) Power supply
a b K Overclocking
June 3, 2012 12:28:48 PM

Many of Seasonic's PSUs are fully modular. On those that aren't, usually the main motherboard connector, a 4+4 pin CPU power connector, and one 6+2 pin PCIE power connector are not. Perhaps the only thing not to like about the modular Antec PSUs I have is that for some bizarre reason both a 4-pin AND an 8-pin CPU power cable are fixed (non-modular), and in 28 years I've never built a system that needed both.
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