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$1,000-1,200 gaming rig

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February 14, 2012 11:06:24 PM

Approximate Purchase Date: This week, maybe next.

Budget Range: $1,000-1,200 (willing to go slightly over if the choices are good.)

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming

Parts Not Required: keyboard, mouse, monitor, speakers

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: newegg.com, ncix.com

Country: U.S.A

Parts Preferences: Intel CPU

Overclocking: If necessary, then yes

SLI or Crossfire: maybe. I'm not sure I will really need to right away since I am definitely sticking with one monitor.

Monitor Resolution: 1920x1080

Additional Comments: Don't want/need an SSD. This computer is pretty much only going to be used for gaming with the occasional movie. Also, I have heard people swear by full tower cases. What is the biggest difference between that and a mid tower? this will be the first computer I have ever built, so I've never had the experience of really using either of them.

More about : 000 200 gaming rig

February 14, 2012 11:22:44 PM

i5 2500k $230
Asrock Pro3 Gen3 $105
Seagate Barracuda 500gb HDD $85
Sapphire 7950 $450
Antec ECO 620w $70
Cooler Master Haf 912 $60
Lg 22x $18
Kingston HyperX 8GB 1333 1.5V $40
Windows 7 $100

Total: $1158

Can run all games maxed basically. Just suggesting that a SSD will speed up load time into maps such as BF3, when they take years, but with an SSD you will be the first in map. If you want to, here's always a suggestion: Crucial M4 or Samsung 830 SSD.

If you want to get a cooler case, you can do that.

Biggest difference between full tower and mid tower is the size, but because full tower is bigger, it has better cooling.
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February 14, 2012 11:28:09 PM

Additions to the above, which is good:
-Don't worry about full tower vs. mid tower. I doubt you'll see more than a couple of degrees of difference.
-If you can find it at a physical Microcenter, the 2500K's $180!
-Get a motherboard and PSU that can handle 7950 Xfire. That's a $120 ASRock Z68 Extreme3 and a $75 OCZ 750W.
Crossfire is the easiest upgrade you can do, and you won't regret the slight extra expense in a couple of years.

I really would like to see an SSD in here. It's a tough call between that and the 7950, which is a great card. It depends what you want: do you want fast boot and level-loading times, or is the wait every time you want to do something worth the excellent gaming performance?
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February 14, 2012 11:32:33 PM

somekidxd said:
i5 2500k $230
Asrock Pro3 Gen3 $105
Seagate Barracuda 500gb HDD $85
Sapphire 7950 $450
Antec ECO 620w $70
Cooler Master Haf 912 $60
Lg 22x $18
Kingston HyperX 8GB 1333 1.5V $40
Windows 7 $100

Total: $1158

Can run all games maxed basically. Just suggesting that a SSD will speed up load time into maps such as BF3, when they take years, but with an SSD you will be the first in map. If you want to, here's always a suggestion: Crucial M4 or Samsung 830 SSD.

If you want to get a cooler case, you can do that.

Biggest difference between full tower and mid tower is the size, but because full tower is bigger, it has better cooling.


I like your suggestion. Would the speed in the ram really make much of a difference? Because, I've seen people say to never go lower than 1600.
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February 14, 2012 11:35:38 PM

kajabla said:
Additions to the above, which is good:
-Don't worry about full tower vs. mid tower. I doubt you'll see more than a couple of degrees of difference.
-If you can find it at a physical Microcenter, the 2500K's $180!
-Get a motherboard and PSU that can handle 7950 Xfire. That's a $120 ASRock Z68 Extreme3 and a $75 OCZ 750W.
Crossfire is the easiest upgrade you can do, and you won't regret the slight extra expense in a couple of years.

I really would like to see an SSD in here. It's a tough call between that and the 7950, which is a great card. It depends what you want: do you want fast boot and level-loading times, or is the wait every time you want to do something worth the excellent gaming performance?


It's a tough choice
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February 14, 2012 11:57:31 PM

On the one hand, the RAM speed shouldn't really make a noticeable difference. On the other, you can easily find 1600mhz sets for $40. On the third hand, using RAM faster than 1333mhz voids the warranty on SB chips, which is lame but shouldn't actually matter.
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February 15, 2012 12:22:04 AM

Technically going over 1.5v and over DDR3 1333 does void the CPU warranty with Sandy Bridge processors. These processors have the memory controller built into the processor itself.

All the benchmarking I have seen shows 1.5v DDR3 1600 cas 9 to be the best pairing with a Sandy system as far as speed goes. I would not go over the 1.5v for sure, but DDR3 1600 shows a decent boost over running DDR3 1333 and I have run DDR3 1600 for over a year on my 2600K with no problems. So I still recommend DDR3 1600 but since I found out about Intel not honoring warrantied due to the RAM I try and tell people who are asking for advice.

So, if you want to run optimal RAM and not worry about damaging your processor either with overclocking or pretty much anything else Intel is offering what they call a tuning plan. This basically gives you one, no questions asked replacement processor if you fry yours. Its $20 for 3 years with the 2500K. Worth checking out.

http://click.intel.com/tuningplan/


I am a big fan of full tower cases. I usually have 4 or 5 hard drives in my computer so it helps as far as that is concerned but it also makes cable management easier. I have an Antec 1200 and love it. I am also a big fan of the Antec DF85. Many people get great results with the Coolermaster Haf 932/Haf X as well.
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February 15, 2012 12:24:12 AM

Also note that you're not going to fry your 2500K if you don't mess with overvoltage, so the tuning plan would be nothing but reassurance.
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