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Changed ram computer turns on but nothing shows up on screen

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February 15, 2012 1:10:28 PM

I get error code 67, using Asus p9x79 ws

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a c 78 B Homebuilt system
February 15, 2012 1:17:49 PM

What was the old RAM?

What are you using now?

If you switch back, does it start working again?

- Edit -

Also, try dropping back to a bare minimum system and see if you have the same error.

Take out everything that is not the motherboard, processor, and 1 stick of RAM. Leave out any hard drives, CD drives, graphics cards, then try to get into the BIOS. Let me know if you can successfully get into the BIOS this way.
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February 15, 2012 1:21:12 PM

Well I was troubleshooting because one ram stick wasn't working so I went in and tried reseating the ram, still one of the sticks was not being detected. So this time i tried moving the ram to different slots. I did this while the computer was still plugged in (though my system was off) , which is i think screwed up. I'm using vengeance low profile ram.
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February 15, 2012 2:04:50 PM

bump, someone please reply, I'm scared shitless right now
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February 15, 2012 3:39:56 PM

Raiddinn said:
What was the old RAM?

What are you using now?

If you switch back, does it start working again?

- Edit -

Also, try dropping back to a bare minimum system and see if you have the same error.

Take out everything that is not the motherboard, processor, and 1 stick of RAM. Leave out any hard drives, CD drives, graphics cards, then try to get into the BIOS. Let me know if you can successfully get into the BIOS this way.


Ok I'll try that thanks for helping tell you what happens
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a c 78 B Homebuilt system
February 15, 2012 3:52:09 PM

I don't generally do anything with the RAM when the power cord is plugged in and its a good idea not to, but plenty of times I have accidentally left the power cord in and messed with the RAM and nothing was ever damaged afterwards.

The likelihood of damaging RAM from taking it out and putting it back in with a power cord inserted is very low, but not zero.

I am going to hazard a guess that whatever your problem is it isn't related to or made worse by that.

- Edit - BTW, bumping your own thread doesn't help you around here. Many people first look for the posts with few to no responses when deciding what to take. If you bumped yourself 10 times it would look like someone tried to help you 5 times and you responded 5 times. This would make people assume the problem was already being handled adequately.

The fewer posts you have in your thread, the better off you are if you want to attract more people.
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February 15, 2012 7:01:27 PM

Raiddinn said:
I don't generally do anything with the RAM when the power cord is plugged in and its a good idea not to, but plenty of times I have accidentally left the power cord in and messed with the RAM and nothing was ever damaged afterwards.

The likelihood of damaging RAM from taking it out and putting it back in with a power cord inserted is very low, but not zero.

I am going to hazard a guess that whatever your problem is it isn't related to or made worse by that.

- Edit - BTW, bumping your own thread doesn't help you around here. Many people first look for the posts with few to no responses when deciding what to take. If you bumped yourself 10 times it would look like someone tried to help you 5 times and you responded 5 times. This would make people assume the problem was already being handled adequately.

The fewer posts you have in your thread, the better off you are if you want to attract more people.


Alright thanks I'll check back soon I'm at school right now lol

Edit- ok how am I supposed to view the bios without the gpu, my motherboard (x79) doesn't have onboard video. Should I just use the gpu In this case?

Also just to let you know the error code on the motherboard (67 as stated earlier) says in the manual that it stands for "CPU DXE Initialized". Wtf is that? When I switch the ram around a couple of times it gives me slightly different codes which are 65 and 66 which are also "CPU DXE Initialized".

I think I'm gonna pick up someone corsair dominator ram at my local frys see of that fixes the problem
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February 15, 2012 10:31:03 PM

xninelives said:
Well I was troubleshooting because one ram stick wasn't working so I went in and tried reseating the ram, still one of the sticks was not being detected. So this time i tried moving the ram to different slots. I did this while the computer was still plugged in (though my system was off) , which is i think screwed up. I'm using vengeance low profile ram.



Okay this is what I've read about X79 chipset motherboards they are Quad Channel DIMM supported, meaning a minimum of 4 modules to be install on the board, but you stated one is not detected, so buy another one memory module with same spec's.
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February 15, 2012 10:55:34 PM

aqe040466 said:
Okay this is what I've read about X79 chipset motherboards they are Quad Channel DIMM supported, meaning a minimum of 4 modules to be install on the board, but you stated one is not detected, so buy another one memory module with same spec's.


That can't be right dude I was running triple channel memory with the 3 Simms that are working when the system first worked.
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a c 78 B Homebuilt system
February 16, 2012 12:14:53 PM

Agreed, "whatever channel" just means it works better if "whatever" is true, not that it can't work at all without "whatever" being true.

No onboard graphics - my bad, I guess I am so used to Intel users having basic graphics built into their processors at the very least. Yes, you can leave the video card in, although it makes some things harder to test/diagnose.

I would get Crucial RAM instead of Corsair if I were you and about to go get RAM to try and address the issue.

Did you sell your old RAM? Is there something preventing you from just putting it back in?

Can you get the system to work at all with just 1 stick of the RAM you are trying to use now?
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February 16, 2012 1:17:20 PM

Raiddinn said:
Agreed, "whatever channel" just means it works better if "whatever" is true, not that it can't work at all without "whatever" being true.

No onboard graphics - my bad, I guess I am so used to Intel users having basic graphics built into their processors at the very least. Yes, you can leave the video card in, although it makes some things harder to test/diagnose.

I would get Crucial RAM instead of Corsair if I were you and about to go get RAM to try and address the issue.

Did you sell your old RAM? Is there something preventing you from just putting it back in?

Can you get the system to work at all with just 1 stick of the RAM you are trying to use now?


Ok last night I contacted asus, this sort of inexperienced guy helped me out. I cleared the CMOS, took off this little cap over two pins moved it to the pin in right, which should apparently clear any settings, and I also flashed the bios using a USB to make sure the bios is in tune with my CPU which is c2 revision.

After doing all of this it still doesn't work.

Not only did I do this but I got a new set of ram at fry's from patriot. I tested it out with the computer, still did not work.

So I talked to my cousin who belonged to the geek squad for a couple I years who is good with custom building a comouter, he couldn't find out what was wrong either. My dad is going to his work since he works at nvidia, he's trying to find a electronically experienced person to help. He did but we haven't heard back.

So what is wrong? My motherboard? Hopeful fuckinly because if it's my $750 CPU I paid for that is dead than I am completely fucked, well actually maybe I could get a replacement by intel if im sneaky enough lol.

I guess I'll try stripping down my system to test a minimal build as you recommended.
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a c 78 B Homebuilt system
February 16, 2012 3:42:11 PM

Crucial and Kingston have by far the lowest RAM failure rates, other major brands are at least 3x as much. Corsair is one of the highest among the major players.

I think if you stick with Crucial in the future, you won't be sorry when it comes to RAM. Just something to keep in mind when you are planning future builds.

I happen to feel that CT2KIT51264BA1339 is about the most ideal set of RAM that currently exists.

Not that you should go get it now if you tried both Corsair and a different set of Patriot then it may really not be the RAM. However, I would still like you to tell me where the old working RAM went.

Also, can you please provide a full list of maker/models of everything in the computer including the case itself?

I am sure I can get this sorted if you just work with me.
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February 16, 2012 6:58:13 PM

Raiddinn said:
Crucial and Kingston have by far the lowest RAM failure rates, other major brands are at least 3x as much. Corsair is one of the highest among the major players.

I think if you stick with Crucial in the future, you won't be sorry when it comes to RAM. Just something to keep in mind when you are planning future builds.

I happen to feel that CT2KIT51264BA1339 is about the most ideal set of RAM that currently exists.

Not that you should go get it now if you tried both Corsair and a different set of Patriot then it may really not be the RAM. However, I would still like you to tell me where the old working RAM went.

Also, can you please provide a full list of maker/models of everything in the computer including the case itself?

I am sure I can get this sorted if you just work with me.


Ok again I'm at school so this is off of memory but I will be having a 4 day weekend so I'll available soon.

Case: 800d
CPU: 3930 C2
Gpu:gtx 470 (it works trust me)
Psu: corsair ax850w
Ram: Corsair vengeance lp 1600mhz quad channel
Second set:
Patriot g2 1600 MHz quad channel.
Both are sets of 16 gb
Storage drive: wd caviar black 500 gb
Cd drive: samsung bluray forget model, but does it really matter?

And I believe that's it...

Oh yeah btw don't think I actually combine the two sets of ram I bought the patriot set to see if the ram was bad.
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a c 78 B Homebuilt system
February 16, 2012 7:48:44 PM

Try it with just 1 stick of RAM at a time. Try it in different slots too.
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February 16, 2012 8:54:55 PM

Raiddinn said:
Try it with just 1 stick of RAM at a time. Try it in different slots too.


I have dude

Look I bought the board on amazon.com I sent in return request and it's authorized, I'm just going to get a new board, that should fix the problem right?
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a c 78 B Homebuilt system
February 17, 2012 1:01:36 AM

If the problem is the board and you get a new one and it is a better one than the one you sent in, then yes it would fix it.

I can't vouch for much of that, though. I am not convinced it is the motherboard.
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February 17, 2012 3:47:53 AM

Raiddinn said:
If the problem is the board and you get a new one and it is a better one than the one you sent in, then yes it would fix it.

I can't vouch for much of that, though. I am not convinced it is the motherboard.


What do you think is causing the problem?
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a c 78 B Homebuilt system
February 17, 2012 3:55:41 PM

The title for the thread says, "Changed RAM, now computer won't display graphics" or something like that.

To me, this means you had working RAM, you got something else, and now you don't have a working computer.

Then you said later you went out and got some Patriot RAM and that didn't work either. To me this looks like a 3rd set.

I asked like half a dozen times what happened to the original set, because if my understanding is right of the problem specifics it matters very much where that set went.

I got no sort of confirmation that you even read these half a dozen questions.

At this point, I think the biggest problem isn't whatever is wrong with your computer, but a failure to communicate between you and I.

Until that is sorted out, I don't think I can really help you with your computer problem.

When you and I can begin communicating effectively, there are a lot of things to check out before a part is declared to have failed.
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February 17, 2012 5:39:30 PM

Raiddinn said:
The title for the thread says, "Changed RAM, now computer won't display graphics" or something like that.

To me, this means you had working RAM, you got something else, and now you don't have a working computer.

Then you said later you went out and got some Patriot RAM and that didn't work either. To me this looks like a 3rd set.

I asked like half a dozen times what happened to the original set, because if my understanding is right of the problem specifics it matters very much where that set went.

I got no sort of confirmation that you even read these half a dozen questions.

At this point, I think the biggest problem isn't whatever is wrong with your computer, but a failure to communicate between you and I.

Until that is sorted out, I don't think I can really help you with your computer problem.

When you and I can begin communicating effectively, there are a lot of things to check out before a part is declared to have failed.


Ok the first set of RAM i got was Corsair Vengeance LP, my computer worked fine for 1 1/2 hours, I installed drivers in that time. When I was finished installing drivers I was going to try to troubleshoot why my system was only detecting 12 GB out of the 16 GB of RAM I had installed. So I shut down the computer and removed the power cable. I then reseated the RAM. I booted it up and it worked, I looked at my system hardware again and it still only recognized 12 GB. So now I shut down my computer, but this time I forget to remove the power cable. I remove all the RAM and move each one one slot to the right, maybe to see if the motherboard DIMM slots were damaged. I then started up the computer but it wouldn't show the BIOS Splash Screen or anything, my monitor's screen is completely blank. So I shut down the computer, worried as hell, and I unplug this time (knowing I had made the mistake of leaving the power cord still plugged into my powersupply), and tried reseating the ram to their original DIMM slots. I just wanted it to boot back up! And so it ended up not booting up still. Thats what happened.

As I've said before I've contacted support from Asus, and talked to some other tech pros. I've done what they tell me to do (such as resetting the cmos and some other reset stuff, including flashing the BIOS from a USB, if that was causing the issue).

So maybe thinking the old Vengeance LP RAM was damaged I went to FRY's and picked up some Patriot RAM (Trust me it's compatible with my mobo). I tried it, and it still didn't work. I even tried the MemOk! function on the Mobo to see if it could recognize the RAM through that function. As usual it didn't. So now I think its my motherboard that is causing these issues.

I'm scared though if my CPU is dead. Could reseating the RAM in different slots with the power cord still plugged into the powersupply overvolt the CPU or some ***, killing it? I mean the motherboard gets stuck at the "CPU DXE Initialization step. Or is the motherboard can't function properly and can't read the CPU?

Any more info just ask, sorry I was typing all the other posts on my iPhone.

Edit - Just to confirm I've only got 2 sets of RAM.
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a c 78 B Homebuilt system
February 17, 2012 6:35:01 PM

Ok, thanks for helping to get us both on the same page.

Just to confirm, you did say that you tried single sticks in different slots, and no changes happened?

Also, just to confirm, you don't know anybody with a similar system, correct? No family members, no friends, or anything like that?

It is unlikely that moving the RAM when the computer was plugged in would cause a problem with the motherboard or CPU, but it is also unlikely that moving the RAM around when the computer is plugged in that it would cause any problem of any kind.

Given that, it does sound like we are in some sort of unlikely scenario at this moment.

With all that has happened, I do sorta lean towards the motherboard, but it would be nice if you knew somebody with a computer you could borrow a CPU from to help verify that.
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February 17, 2012 7:25:15 PM

Raiddinn said:
Ok, thanks for helping to get us both on the same page.

Just to confirm, you did say that you tried single sticks in different slots, and no changes happened?

Also, just to confirm, you don't know anybody with a similar system, correct? No family members, no friends, or anything like that?

It is unlikely that moving the RAM when the computer was plugged in would cause a problem with the motherboard or CPU, but it is also unlikely that moving the RAM around when the computer is plugged in that it would cause any problem of any kind.

Given that, it does sound like we are in some sort of unlikely scenario at this moment.

With all that has happened, I do sorta lean towards the motherboard, but it would be nice if you knew somebody with a computer you could borrow a CPU from to help verify that.


I have one family member that is made his own pc but he's on LGA 1366 so no dice for borrowing a CPU.

To confirm yes I did put a single stick in each DIMM slot, but not all slots.
Why would it matter, putting a single ram stick in each slot?
How is that going to fix the problem and allow it to boot?
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a c 78 B Homebuilt system
February 17, 2012 8:12:48 PM

If the problem is a bad stick or a bad slot, changing sticks and slots should help to determine that is the root cause.

The same reason is why to test with only 1 stick and not 2 or 3 or 4. The chances you have something in a bad slot are 2x, 3x, or 4x higher if you are testing with 4 sticks at once. The chances that are you are testing with a bad stick inserted are 2x, 3x, or 4x higher if you have that many sticks inserted at once too.

The ideal test scenario would have each stick tried in each slot one at a time, but with 4 sticks and 8 slots that could take 32 rounds of testing to get through. Nobody really wants to sit through that. It could take like 8 hours.

The most representative way is to randomize the sticks and try 1 in each available slot. That would mean with 4 sticks and 8 slots you would try each stick in 2 random slots and where all the slots were covered.

That wouldn't be foolproof, but the next best thing is to go beyond those 8 tests and start overlapping slots with different sticks. The benefit of doing this would be negligible, though.

Just sayin, its part of a semi-scientific process we try when it seems to be helpful.

The problem does seem more likely to be a CPU or Motherboard problem, but very often it is the thing you never considered that is the real problem.

As an example, my computer got slower and slower in the late 2000s. It got bad enough in 2011 that it would take 10 - 15 min to boot up. I tried a lot of things that made sense and nothing caused my computer to get fixed.

The most likely thing that caused this in my case was a hard drive taken out of a DVR that was never intended to be in computers at all. I had the hardest time even getting the thing to work to begin with.

However, the computer was still slow even if it wasn't connected. It caused me to wonder if somehow the bad drive had corrupted my OSs.

It turned out that my CD drive was bad, though. One day I disconnected it (when I was changing cases) and forgot to reconnect it. The computer booted up right away, in 30 sec or less. I connected the CD drive and it again took 15 min. Disconnected and it again took 30sec. Then I replaced the CD drive and now everything is peachy.

I am just saying, you never know where your problem lies. Most people that come in here have the wrong thing as their gut feeling.

I am just saying, I don't like to declare that something is or is not related to X unless that has been thoroughly tested.

I have gut feelings that help guide me to telling people what to test, but I generally avoid telling people to RMA blind unless it is a last resort. That just increases the cost of things for everybody and nobody wants that.

If there is no possibility for you to test things any further, you may just have to RMA based on the testing so far, but sometimes there are no other alternatives.

It would still be nice if you could test some things, though, like whether or not the computer starts working if you put the other family member's PSU in your PC, assuming it is remotely capable of handling the task that is.

As far as the RAM affecting the boot process, the RAM, Motherboard, and CPU are a unit that works very closely together. Any of them can easily affect any other. Sometimes in ways that only make sense to people that are electrical engineers.
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February 17, 2012 8:22:52 PM

Raiddinn said:
If the problem is a bad stick or a bad slot, changing sticks and slots should help to determine that is the root cause.

The same reason is why to test with only 1 stick and not 2 or 3 or 4. The chances you have something in a bad slot are 2x, 3x, or 4x higher if you are testing with 4 sticks at once. The chances that are you are testing with a bad stick inserted are 2x, 3x, or 4x higher if you have that many sticks inserted at once too.

The ideal test scenario would have each stick tried in each slot one at a time, but with 4 sticks and 8 slots that could take 32 rounds of testing to get through. Nobody really wants to sit through that. It could take like 8 hours.

The most representative way is to randomize the sticks and try 1 in each available slot. That would mean with 4 sticks and 8 slots you would try each stick in 2 random slots and where all the slots were covered.

That wouldn't be foolproof, but the next best thing is to go beyond those 8 tests and start overlapping slots with different sticks. The benefit of doing this would be negligible, though.

Just sayin, its part of a semi-scientific process we try when it seems to be helpful.

The problem does seem more likely to be a CPU or Motherboard problem, but very often it is the thing you never considered that is the real problem.

As an example, my computer got slower and slower in the late 2000s. It got bad enough in 2011 that it would take 10 - 15 min to boot up. I tried a lot of things that made sense and nothing caused my computer to get fixed.

The most likely thing that caused this in my case was a hard drive taken out of a DVR that was never intended to be in computers at all. I had the hardest time even getting the thing to work to begin with.

However, the computer was still slow even if it wasn't connected. It caused me to wonder if somehow the bad drive had corrupted my OSs.

It turned out that my CD drive was bad, though. One day I disconnected it (when I was changing cases) and forgot to reconnect it. The computer booted up right away, in 30 sec or less. I connected the CD drive and it again took 15 min. Disconnected and it again took 30sec. Then I replaced the CD drive and now everything is peachy.

I am just saying, you never know where your problem lies. Most people that come in here have the wrong thing as their gut feeling.

I am just saying, I don't like to declare that something is or is not related to X unless that has been thoroughly tested.

I have gut feelings that help guide me to telling people what to test, but I generally avoid telling people to RMA blind unless it is a last resort. That just increases the cost of things for everybody and nobody wants that.

If there is no possibility for you to test things any further, you may just have to RMA based on the testing so far, but sometimes there are no other alternatives.

It would still be nice if you could test some things, though, like whether or not the computer starts working if you put the other family member's PSU in your PC, assuming it is remotely capable of handling the task that is.

As far as the RAM affecting the boot process, the RAM, Motherboard, and CPU are a unit that works very closely together. Any of them can easily affect any other. Sometimes in ways that only make sense to people that are electrical engineers.


Ok I'll test the ram and try disconnecting some things as soon as I get home from lunch. I really hope it's not the CPU.
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February 18, 2012 2:00:49 AM

Raiddinn said:
If the problem is a bad stick or a bad slot, changing sticks and slots should help to determine that is the root cause.

The same reason is why to test with only 1 stick and not 2 or 3 or 4. The chances you have something in a bad slot are 2x, 3x, or 4x higher if you are testing with 4 sticks at once. The chances that are you are testing with a bad stick inserted are 2x, 3x, or 4x higher if you have that many sticks inserted at once too.

The ideal test scenario would have each stick tried in each slot one at a time, but with 4 sticks and 8 slots that could take 32 rounds of testing to get through. Nobody really wants to sit through that. It could take like 8 hours.

The most representative way is to randomize the sticks and try 1 in each available slot. That would mean with 4 sticks and 8 slots you would try each stick in 2 random slots and where all the slots were covered.

That wouldn't be foolproof, but the next best thing is to go beyond those 8 tests and start overlapping slots with different sticks. The benefit of doing this would be negligible, though.

Just sayin, its part of a semi-scientific process we try when it seems to be helpful.

The problem does seem more likely to be a CPU or Motherboard problem, but very often it is the thing you never considered that is the real problem.

As an example, my computer got slower and slower in the late 2000s. It got bad enough in 2011 that it would take 10 - 15 min to boot up. I tried a lot of things that made sense and nothing caused my computer to get fixed.

The most likely thing that caused this in my case was a hard drive taken out of a DVR that was never intended to be in computers at all. I had the hardest time even getting the thing to work to begin with.

However, the computer was still slow even if it wasn't connected. It caused me to wonder if somehow the bad drive had corrupted my OSs.

It turned out that my CD drive was bad, though. One day I disconnected it (when I was changing cases) and forgot to reconnect it. The computer booted up right away, in 30 sec or less. I connected the CD drive and it again took 15 min. Disconnected and it again took 30sec. Then I replaced the CD drive and now everything is peachy.

I am just saying, you never know where your problem lies. Most people that come in here have the wrong thing as their gut feeling.

I am just saying, I don't like to declare that something is or is not related to X unless that has been thoroughly tested.

I have gut feelings that help guide me to telling people what to test, but I generally avoid telling people to RMA blind unless it is a last resort. That just increases the cost of things for everybody and nobody wants that.

If there is no possibility for you to test things any further, you may just have to RMA based on the testing so far, but sometimes there are no other alternatives.

It would still be nice if you could test some things, though, like whether or not the computer starts working if you put the other family member's PSU in your PC, assuming it is remotely capable of handling the task that is.

As far as the RAM affecting the boot process, the RAM, Motherboard, and CPU are a unit that works very closely together. Any of them can easily affect any other. Sometimes in ways that only make sense to people that are electrical engineers.


Ok bro I got it working. I put a patriot DIMM into the very first slot (out of 8, the one farthest to the left). I then tried putting all 4 in again, exactly how the motherboard manual recommends. It gives me error 67 again! So I removed the DIMMs and to what I had at the beginning, only one DIMM in the first slot. So should I add one DIMM at a time until it works? If it still gives me an error when I insert the RAM after every combination, isn't there a way to patch or sync the RAM with the motherboard enabling it to work?
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a c 78 B Homebuilt system
February 18, 2012 1:28:54 PM

If it will work with 1 inserted and not with 4 inserted, it sounds like there is a port on the motherboard that isn't working. Either that or at least one stick of each kind is bad.

You should try adding more and in varying slots to try to narrow down exactly when the problem happens, yes.

If you can narrow down which slot is causing problems (if it is slot related) then you can try one that works in that slot to help verify.

If it is so that one stick of RAM of each sort won't work regardless where it is inserted (even in slot 1) that would point to bad RAM.
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February 18, 2012 5:47:37 PM

Raiddinn said:
If it will work with 1 inserted and not with 4 inserted, it sounds like there is a port on the motherboard that isn't working. Either that or at least one stick of each kind is bad.

You should try adding more and in varying slots to try to narrow down exactly when the problem happens, yes.

If you can narrow down which slot is causing problems (if it is slot related) then you can try one that works in that slot to help verify.

If it is so that one stick of RAM of each sort won't work regardless where it is inserted (even in slot 1) that would point to bad RAM.


What I did was add a stick one at a time to the motherboard. I made it to 3 sticks and when I went in to my operating system it only detects 8gb out of the 12gb, so then I went to put in my 4th stick and it works just like the first time I started up my computer. So the whole problem was that the motherboard came defective. Reinserting the DIMMs with the power on didn't even matter!

Anyways I really do appreciate all your help, I'm just going to stick with 12gb.
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February 18, 2012 5:48:13 PM

Best answer selected by xNiNELiVES.
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a c 78 B Homebuilt system
February 18, 2012 6:03:46 PM

When you had the 3 sticks inserted that registered 8GBs in Windows, did they register in the BIOS as the full amount?
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