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Intel i5 2500k and required cooling - please help.

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June 3, 2012 5:09:40 AM

Hey all.

I am soon to build my first gaming rig and have a few questions about CPU cooling and overclocking.

I'm not sure if it is needed here, but here are the full specs:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-2500K 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($169.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus P8Z68-V LE ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($132.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair XMS3 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($51.99 @ Newegg)
Hard Drive: Seagate Barracuda 500GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($419.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Azza CSAZ-1000 ATX Full Tower Case ($89.98 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: OCZ 750W ATX12V Power Supply ($79.96 @ NCIX US)
Total: $1044.88
(Prices include shipping and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-06-03 00:59 EDT-0400)

When I have this computer built, I would like to over clock the i5 2500k for better overall performance.
Will the Cooler Master EVO 12 keep an overclocked 2500k from frying? I have seen that people can overclock these things to 4.8GHZ.

I just want to make sure I get everything right and that everything will run safe before I buy.

Thanks
a b à CPUs
June 3, 2012 5:12:04 AM

Not to worry. The 2112 EVO will keep your cpu cool all the way up to 4.5 and even a little beyond that.
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June 3, 2012 5:28:22 AM

abekl said:
Not to worry. The 2112 EVO will keep your cpu cool all the way up to 4.5 and even a little beyond that.


Sweet thanks.

I should probably make a new thread about this, but is overclocking hard to do? And is it easy to select what GHZ you overclock to?
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a b à CPUs
June 3, 2012 5:58:50 AM

Overclocking is not per se- hard. You have/ need to look at instructions and understand them and have a lot of patience. Without a basic understanding of how to overclock on your specific motherboard; you run a risk of frying the darn thing.

Read. Read. Read. If you don't understand then read some more. If you can't figure anything out after reading through numerous guides then you come and ask!

To the point. Oc'ing is pretty easy as long you get the gyst of it. You need to incrementally increase the cpu multiplier step by step and you need to do stress testing as well to ensure the cpu is stable. Extra voltage may be required.

Overclocking guides will be more helpful but do not expect to get the same result as another person with the same setup. Each CPU and component of a computer are unique and never identical to another. One cpu might easily hit 4.5 with minimal voltage increased but another might need insane cooling/ voltage increase to hit the same speed. It varies - hence you need a whole lot of patience.
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June 3, 2012 6:04:01 AM

lilotimz said:
Overclocking is not per se- hard. You have/ need to look at instructions and understand them and have a lot of patience. Without a basic understanding of how to overclock on your specific motherboard; you run a risk of frying the darn thing.

Read. Read. Read. If you don't understand then read some more. If you can't figure anything out after reading through numerous guides then you come and ask!

To the point. Oc'ing is pretty easy as long you get the gyst of it. You need to incrementally increase the cpu multiplier step by step and you need to do stress testing as well to ensure the cpu is stable. Extra voltage may be required.

Overclocking guides will be more helpful but do not expect to get the same result as another person with the same setup. Each CPU and component of a computer are unique and never identical to another. One cpu might easily hit 4.5 with minimal voltage increased but another might need insane cooling/ voltage increase to hit the same speed. It varies - hence you need a whole lot of patience.


Thanks. I have people that will be able to help me with it anyway. Do you do it physically pulling things apart, or do you do it all through programs and on the screen?

Again thanks.
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a b à CPUs
June 3, 2012 6:31:39 AM

You do it through the bios. Each one is unique to the manufacturer and model. Hence why you need to read and read some more.
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June 4, 2012 7:15:45 PM

I believe the ASUS board will have an Auto-tune feature that will bump your multipliers up automagically. On my P8Z68-v GEN 3 it took my 2500k to 4.3 GHz, I played with the multipliers a bit and achieved 4.53. I also use that same cooler and my temps are somewhere around 63C-65C ish during Prime95 depending on ambient temps.
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June 4, 2012 7:17:49 PM

I just use Auto voltages with that as well, haven't had any stability issues with this speed.
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!