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I5 3750k vs i7 2600k

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June 3, 2012 9:19:22 PM

Well I posted the gaming build I wanted to use and for CPU I have chosen i7 2600k. But most people told me i5 3750k is way better for gaming because it is Ivy Bridge. I'm not so good with Intel CPUs since I used AMD ones mostly but I wanted to go with Intel on my new build. Can someone explain to me why is i5 3750k better than i7 2600k?

More about : 3750k 2600k

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June 3, 2012 9:49:37 PM

The i5's generally perform the same as the i7's in gaming...which is why most people recommend i5's if your rig is strictly gaming.

The reason for this is because i5's are basically i7's without the hyperthreading, and most games can't utilise more than 4 threads...so there's no point to the 8 that the i7 can provide.

Now going onto Ivy Bridge and Sandy Bridge. Ivy Bridge generally performs around 5-10% faster than Sandy Bridge clock for clock, so the i5 3570k has a small advantage over the i7 2600k.
Related resources
June 4, 2012 2:52:10 AM

Stefan I hope its not too late to change your mind about processors in your new build. I'm in the process of a new build my self and chose the i5-3570K based on the benchmarks and price. I will be overclocking:
Stock CPU 3.4 GHz Turbo 3.8GHz
CPU stable @4.7GHz 1.27v ( @4.8GHZ out-performs I7-2600K O.C'ed at 5GHz with less heat, see links)
Stock iGPU 1150MHZ (using much improved HD4000 over the i7-2600K)
iGPU stable @1600MHz 0.12v
You might be able to do decent gaming w/o discrete graphics card at this time and anyway your options for SLI later are better with the 3rd generation card. Another good article is: http://www.hitechlegion.com/reviews/processors/18324-in...
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June 4, 2012 2:55:09 AM

On the other hand, IB CPUs have an inferior thermal interface system, so they may not last as long with heavy overclocks due to their high operating temperatures. Ivy is still probably the way to go.
As far as I can tell, you haven't actually posted your build. http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/forum1.php?config=tom...|28*tomshardwareus|31*tomshardwareus|33*tomshardwareus|13*tomshardwareus|&orderSearch=0&recherches=1&resSearch=200&jour=0&mois=0&annee=0&titre=3&search=&pseud=stefan37&daterange=2&searchtype=1&searchall=1
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June 4, 2012 3:41:28 AM

kevin_07 said:
Stefan I hope its not too late to change your mind about processors in your new build. I'm in the process of a new build my self and chose the i5-3570K based on the benchmarks and price. I will be overclocking:
Stock CPU 3.4 GHz Turbo 3.8GHz
CPU stable @4.7GHz 1.27v ( @4.8GHZ out-performs I7-2600K O.C'ed at 5GHz with less heat, see links)
Stock iGPU 1150MHZ (using much improved HD4000 over the i7-2600K)
iGPU stable @1600MHz 0.12v
You might be able to do decent gaming w/o discrete graphics card at this time and anyway your options for SLI later are better with the 3rd generation card. Another good article is: http://www.hitechlegion.com/reviews/processors/18324-in...


hahahaha good luck with overclocking that to 4.8 with good temps unless your using custom water cooling.
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June 4, 2012 5:31:38 AM

yup, kevin_07 you are set for dissapointment there.

yes ivy is definatly faster clock for clock. (10% is the MAXIMUM, average is 3-5%) and use less voltage doing it.

HOWEVER, even at much less voltage IVY produces MUCH MORE Heat than sandy.
this is due to the die shrink and having 40% more transistors (mostly for the HD4000 graphics) in that smaller area. combine that with the switch from soldered based TIM to a paste means that heat dispursion is ALOT WORSE.

i still agree building a new system today i would choose IVY, but on the same note i will not be changing from sandy to ivy. not worth the $$$ IMO.
June 4, 2012 6:13:27 AM

HugoStiglitz said:
yup, kevin_07 you are set for dissapointment there.

yes ivy is definatly faster clock for clock. (10% is the MAXIMUM, average is 3-5%) and use less voltage doing it.

HOWEVER, even at much less voltage IVY produces MUCH MORE Heat than sandy.
this is due to the die shrink and having 40% more transistors (mostly for the HD4000 graphics) in that smaller area. combine that with the switch from soldered based TIM to a paste means that heat dispursion is ALOT WORSE.

i still agree building a new system today i would choose IVY, but on the same note i will not be changing from sandy to ivy. not worth the $$$ IMO.

Again folks check the citation http://www.madshrimps.be/articles/article/1000289/Intel...
before spewing all the negativity. The review speaks for itself and in no uncertain terms IT IS DOABLE on air and generates less heat than Sandies @ 5GHz
June 4, 2012 8:49:01 AM

kajabla said:
On the other hand, IB CPUs have an inferior thermal interface system, so they may not last as long with heavy overclocks due to their high operating temperatures. Ivy is still probably the way to go.
As far as I can tell, you haven't actually posted your build. http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/forum1.php?config=tom...|28*tomshardwareus|31*tomshardwareus|33*tomshardwareus|13*tomshardwareus|&orderSearch=0&recherches=1&resSearch=200&jour=0&mois=0&annee=0&titre=3&search=&pseud=stefan37&daterange=2&searchtype=1&searchall=1

I did post my build but just not on this section here is a link http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/348817-13-gaming-10...
June 4, 2012 8:50:11 AM

Also thank you for your replies but can someone tell me which would be the best for my build oh and also in my build I said I will buy HD 7850 but now I think I'll get HD 7870 one...
June 4, 2012 8:52:52 AM

kevin_07 said:
Stefan I hope its not too late to change your mind about processors in your new build. I'm in the process of a new build my self and chose the i5-3570K based on the benchmarks and price. I will be overclocking:
Stock CPU 3.4 GHz Turbo 3.8GHz
CPU stable @4.7GHz 1.27v ( @4.8GHZ out-performs I7-2600K O.C'ed at 5GHz with less heat, see links)
Stock iGPU 1150MHZ (using much improved HD4000 over the i7-2600K)
iGPU stable @1600MHz 0.12v
You might be able to do decent gaming w/o discrete graphics card at this time and anyway your options for SLI later are better with the 3rd generation card. Another good article is: http://www.hitechlegion.com/reviews/processors/18324-in...

Nah It isn't late it is actually early because I'm buying the PC in September but I like to think about parts on time because I don't want mess later :D 
June 4, 2012 12:47:49 PM

Notice that the naysayers* trying to dissuade you from starting with a leading edge 3rd generation processor are both sandy users, nuff sed! Maybe they harbor unusual feelings toward those of us not stuck with yesterday's technology. The i5-357K is just a cut below the i7-3770K, arguably Intel's fastest consumer processor without going extreme (meaning $$$). *one of them is using an air-cooler that wouldn't fit in some garages and the other is using water which further complicates a build in a smaller case (not to mention water around the electronics in what might be your first build). You spoke of a "mess later". Just sayin'!
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June 4, 2012 1:43:28 PM

1] 2600K (2nd gen i7) is a quad core with hyperthreading, virtualizing 8 threads. The 3570k is a 3rd gen i5 based on the new IB 22nm dieshrink.

2] IB vs SB is at best a 2-3% improvement so its not a massive peformance jump.

3] If not on a new platform, it is advisable to go with IB....I would recommend the 3570K with the Gigabyte Z77-UD5H....if you have cash to blow then the Gigabyte G3 Assassin....the best Z77 boards out right now.
June 4, 2012 2:14:22 PM

I thinka z77 mobo would be wasted on an i7-2xxx and you don't need an i7- if hyperthreading, i.e. 2 threads/core is not essential for your usual application, like gaming. The HD 7870 runs around $330. I'd opt for a comparably priced NVidia product preferably from EVGA for great cust. service but that might just be my personal bias! The EVGA SuperClocked GeForce GTX 570 (Fermi) 1280MB 320-bit GDDR5 is $295 at Newegg last time I checked. It is compared to the new HD 6970 which sells at the same price point, see: http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/EVGA-GeForce-GTX...
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June 4, 2012 2:20:07 PM

1] Yes a second gen intel core I processor (Sandybridge) is wasted on a Z7X chipset...

2] Why on the face of this planet did you take a GTX 570 over a HD 7870???? good lawd.
June 4, 2012 2:59:15 PM

My bad ... not very familiar with the Radeon products
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June 4, 2012 10:37:18 PM

Kevin_07

have you looked at other reviews?

extract from below link
Quote:

@ 1.1V IB runs 4,25C hotter then SB with HT off. (16.03%)
@ 1.2V IB runs 10,75C hotter then SB with HT off. (36.44%)
@ 1.3V IB runs 15,00C hotter then SB with HT off. (44.11%)
@ 1.4V IB runs 24,75C hotter then SB with HT off. (65.56%)

thats a 3570k vs a 2600k (with HT off) so for all purposes a 2500k

Quote:

So in short 50% of IB chips will do:

- ~4.4Ghz on Air with HT on, this is about 4.7Ghz on a Sandy Bridge
- ~4.7Ghz on a decent custom watercooling loop = 5Ghz Sandy Bridge
- ~5.0Ghz on a good custom watercooling loop = 5.3Ghz Sandy Bridge.



the above was done with

Quote:
Cooling
Custom loop, dual HwLabs GTX360 GT-15 Push-Pull 10-15c ambient.


thats 1000-1200watts of cooling ability.

i dont know where you got the expectation to get an IB @ 4.7 with Air. unless you bank on getting a golden chip.

for your reference see below
http://www.overclock.net/t/1242313/more-ivy-bridge-benchmarks-sandybridge-comparison-3770k-vs-2600k-performance-temps-etc-couple-of-ln2-scores-are-up#

again read my post. I never reccomended the OP get a Sandy over an Ivy.
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June 4, 2012 10:41:18 PM

and here is a quote from your own thread

Quote:


Ivy bridge will not cut it on air. 4600-4800MHz is easily doable with our ES models. But that's where it ends on air or water. We were spoiled with Sandy Bridge with some silicon doing daily 5000MHz on air. Benching on air or water at +5600MHz was no issue with the SB generation.


they are using an ES chip (engineering sample) can only be taken as a very rough guide.
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June 4, 2012 10:50:40 PM

Benchmarks from my linked thread this is with both SB & IB at the exact same clock speeds

Quote:

3DMark 11.
3.4Ghz - 0.75% Improvement
4.5Ghz - 4.63% Improvement

3DMark Vantage
3.4Ghz - 3.47% Improvement
4.5Ghz - 4.41% Improvement

CineBench
3.4Ghz - 4.41% Improvement
4.5Ghz - 5.35% Improvement

SuperPi 32M
3.4Ghz - 3.37% Improvement
4.5Ghz - 2.77% Improvement

Wprime 1.55
3.4Ghz - 4.76% Improvement
4.5Ghz - 4.26% Improvement

Wprime 2.09
3.4Ghz - 4.71% Improvement
4.5Ghz - 3.94% Improvement

Handbrake
3.4Ghz - 7.39% Improvement
4.5Ghz - 8.08% Improvement


which is a 4.45% average clock for clock speed increase.





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June 4, 2012 11:11:36 PM

kevin_07 said:
The review speaks for itself and in no uncertain terms IT IS DOABLE on air and generates less heat than Sandies @ 5GHz

The 3700K and 3570K run at 89 and 80C respectively. The 2700K and 2500K run at 75 and 63C respectively. Just saying. Ivy is indisputably hotter.

OP, has anyone told you to drop to 1600mhz RAM?
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June 4, 2012 11:21:47 PM

kevin_07 said:
Notice that the naysayers* trying to dissuade you from starting with a leading edge 3rd generation processor are both sandy users, nuff sed! Maybe they harbor unusual feelings toward those of us not stuck with yesterday's technology. The i5-357K is just a cut below the i7-3770K, arguably Intel's fastest consumer processor without going extreme (meaning $$$). *one of them is using an air-cooler that wouldn't fit in some garages and the other is using water which further complicates a build in a smaller case (not to mention water around the electronics in what might be your first build). You spoke of a "mess later". Just sayin'!


i wonder who you are talking about....? Brave enough to say something like that and not to name names. and its not like its offensive or anything.

you are missing the point though. a 2600k has the ability to overclock past where a 3570k would still hold an advantage.

on top of that if people buy cheap air(212+) then it seems they would be lucky to get 4.3 where as on cheap air you could get at least 4.6-4.7.

June 5, 2012 12:27:54 AM

to cbrunnem and hugo stuglitz:
What I misinterpretted for a dogmatic "brand loyalty" regarding sandy bridge over ivy may, in truth, be just a broader knowledge of of the whole overclocking/cooling subject. The facts you led me to are irrefutable and I thank you for the edification. This being my first serious build ( at a considerable cash-outlay) I may have been overly defensive of my decisions(good or bad) that went into the selection of components. I will have to assemble it and hope for the best!?! The processor (i5-3570K) and 8Gb 1866MHZ RAM arrives tomorrow...the final pieces. I'm not sure why the faster 1866MHz RAM was a mistake over 1600MHz but would appreciate any insight you can provide, kajabla. Always willing to learn. Please accept this post as a humble apology for any wrankling I may have caused.
June 5, 2012 12:28:00 AM

sarinaide said:
1] 2600K (2nd gen i7) is a quad core with hyperthreading, virtualizing 8 threads. The 3570k is a 3rd gen i5 based on the new IB 22nm dieshrink.

2] IB vs SB is at best a 2-3% improvement so its not a massive peformance jump.

3] If not on a new platform, it is advisable to go with IB....I would recommend the 3570K with the Gigabyte Z77-UD5H....if you have cash to blow then the Gigabyte G3 Assassin....the best Z77 boards out right now.



A couple of questions:

-what kind of graphics card are you running with the Z77?
-know of any issues with the Gigabyte MBs? I just went through RMAing GB MBs and it turned out they had a controller problem which kept my video card (6770) from working on them. Nice board otherwise. But really really bad experience.
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June 5, 2012 12:38:18 AM

kevin_07 said:
to cbrunnem and hugo stuglitz:
What I misinterpretted for a dogmatic "brand loyalty" regarding sandy bridge over ivy may, in truth, be just a broader knowledge of of the whole overclocking/cooling subject. The facts you led me to are irrefutable and I thank you for the edification. This being my first serious build ( at a considerable cash-outlay) I may have been overly defensive of my decisions(good or bad) that went into the selection of components. I will have to assemble it and hope for the best!?! The processor (i5-3570K) and 8Gb 1866MHZ RAM arrives tomorrow...the final pieces. I'm not sure why the faster 1866MHz RAM was a mistake over 1600MHz but would appreciate any insight you can provide. Always willing to learn. Please accept this post as a humble apology for any wrankling I may have caused.


its not a bad decission in regards with performance but the fact that the performance you get for the money you spend is not worth it. you will not gain very much in terms of gaming performance.
June 5, 2012 12:43:15 AM

Thanks for the heads up on the RAM speed. The next 2 sticks will be 1600MHz
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June 5, 2012 1:25:58 AM

best to keep all ur sticks the same, so keep with the 1866 imo.

its not a wrong decision its just if you are on a tight budget then you can get the same performance (give or take 1%) by getting 1600mhz and spending the savings somewhere else. like towards a SSD or better video card where it will be more like 10-20%

i personally also have 1866mhz ram.
June 5, 2012 2:12:46 AM

HugoStiglitz said:
best to keep all ur sticks the same, so keep with the 1866 imo.

its not a wrong decision its just if you are on a tight budget then you can get the same performance (give or take 1%) by getting 1600mhz and spending the savings somewhere else. like towards a SSD or better video card where it will be more like 10-20%

i personally also have 1866mhz ram.

I already have an OCZ Agility 120GB SATA-3.0 (6Gb/s) SSD
Is there a favorable price/performance ratio with having a fully populated board w/16Gb of 1866MHz RAM?
I'm going to go cheap on the card for now...prob. a GTX 550 Ti Superclocked !GB DDR5
and then when the budget allows, buy a twin to put in SLI
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June 5, 2012 2:22:03 AM

There is not a favorable situation with all 1866mhz sticks (I suggested 1600mhz RAM because it's the best value), but it's very iffy to mix RAM sticks at all, and it's better to drop a few extra dollars on an exactly matching set than to find that the two sets don't work together.
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June 5, 2012 2:47:09 AM

there will be almost 0 diff in performance once you hit 6gb RAM and over.

way better spending that extra $$$ on video cards. getting ur self to the 560ti or even someting in the 6xx series as they will be far easier to get a hold of once you ready to go SLI.
June 5, 2012 3:04:12 AM

In the interest of full disclosure, I'm not a gamer. Never had a system to be 1. My lean is to brute number crunching with some emphasis on graphics but not nec. super hi FPS.Mostly physics modeling (with the assoc. rendering),AutoCad Inventor and Mechanical,Mathworks MatLab,Cubase 5 midi-recording,video encoding,Flight Sim.(here FPS is imp.) and gaming(?) Pretty much in that order at this point.
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June 5, 2012 3:29:16 AM

kevin_07 said:
In the interest of full disclosure, I'm not a gamer. Never had a system to be 1. My lean is to brute number crunching with some emphasis on graphics but not nec. super hi FPS.Mostly physics modeling (with the assoc. rendering),AutoCad Inventor and Mechanical,Mathworks MatLab,Cubase 5 midi-recording,video encoding,Flight Sim.(here FPS is imp.) and gaming(?) Pretty much in that order at this point.


for you cad type programs you need no more then 1 core so those do not affect what you get.
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June 5, 2012 3:30:36 AM

3D Physics?
i7 will always win.
June 5, 2012 3:44:34 AM

too late to splurge on a i7-3770 and i saved $110 getting the i5-3570K and no i7-2xxx i'm an "Ivy Leaguer" at this point. So the physics will suffer. I didn't know hyperT was put to good use yet in3D physics modeling imean nVidia does alot of the heavy lifting in that regard ,no?
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June 5, 2012 12:16:23 PM

mongobird said:
A couple of questions:

-what kind of graphics card are you running with the Z77?
-know of any issues with the Gigabyte MBs? I just went through RMAing GB MBs and it turned out they had a controller problem which kept my video card (6770) from working on them. Nice board otherwise. But really really bad experience.


Gigabyte had a pretty rough time with the 60 Series motherboards, RMA issues were not isolated affairs I remember having to return an entire test batch of Gigabyte boards all with the same inherent defect. Great news is Gigabyte have hit back with the 70 series chipsets, fantastic build quality all around.

G1-series is to Gigabyte what ROG is to ASUS, a high end gamer board, sadly the G1 through its humble starts on the 1366 and then on the Z68 platform was more gimmicky and flimsy at best, the good news is that Gigabyte have dropped the aesthetics to focus on quality and they have delivered. With ASUS Maximus still a no show on the Z77 platform the G1 Assassin 3 is the best gamers board on the market for this platform, while retaining some measure of eyecandy.

The Z77-UD5H obviously well cheaper than the G1 Assassin but you can bring any motherboard and try beat this board in a overclocking showdown. Fact this board hands a Asrock Fatality Z77 a beating at a lower price point.

You can also wait for ASUS to release the Maximus V, which will likely be another outstanding board which will go toe to toe with a G1 Assassin. It all depends on how much you want to spend. Personally the UD5H is more than enough, enthusiast gamers boards are not necessary(but when you own one you will know why they are amazing).

Card testing samples;

GTX 680
GTX 680 SLI
HD 7970
HD 7970 CF
HD 7950
HD 7850
HD 7850 CF
GTX 670
HD 6970
HD 6970 CF
HD 6970 + 6990 Tri-fire
GTX 570
GTX 580 SLI
GTX 560ti 448
GTX 560 SLI
HD 5970
HD 5870
GTX 480
GTX 460 1gb version SLI
GTX 295
GTX 275
HD 6870 CF
HD 6850 CF
June 5, 2012 12:20:26 PM

kajabla said:
The 3700K and 3570K run at 89 and 80C respectively. The 2700K and 2500K run at 75 and 63C respectively. Just saying. Ivy is indisputably hotter.

OP, has anyone told you to drop to 1600mhz RAM?

Yeah some guy told me that I shouldn't get 2000mhz Ram but the 1600mhz one. Since I'm a noob can you explain me why should I drop down?
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June 5, 2012 12:23:12 PM

Because you will not be getting noticable performance gains, at a hell of a lot more cash being outlayed, 1600mhz is the sweet spot.
June 5, 2012 12:25:14 PM

Also I thought going with ASUS P8Z77-V Deluxe mobo why should I drop it and go with Gigabyte?
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June 5, 2012 12:29:06 PM

Not saying you have to drop it, it is a good board too, the UD5H is just from testing the best Z77 board at the price point with the features and performance it gives.

And on the RAM issue, Intel don't support a native Memory controller higher than 1600mhz any ways, to run the 2000mhz it will require a overclock on the RAM, in other instances it will clock down to native 1866mhz speeds as 2000mhz is not supported natively on the motherboards (this was the case with sandy, Ivy motherboards support up to 2600mhz, not native though)
!