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Looking for some input on a new build

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February 18, 2012 5:10:32 AM

Hello Everyone,

So I have been working on organizing parts to get for my first full build which I want to start in the next month or so. I have spent a good amount of time researching and would now like to hear what others have to say about the setup before I decide this is what I am going to order. There are very few limitations on parts other than that I am getting the AMD CPU which is listed below. Thank you in advance for any and all input. The following is all the information I have:

Approximate Purchase Date: March/April

Budget Range: Would like not to go over $2000

System Usage from Most to Least Important: (sorted from most to least important)
  • Gaming
  • Watching movies
  • Surfing the internet

    Parts Not Required: Monitor

    Preferred Website(s) for Parts: newegg.com

    Country: U.S.A.

    Parts Preferences: AMD CPU is a must. Always liked nVidea and ASUS

    Overclocking: Most likely

    SLI or Crossfire: Maybe

    Monitor Resolution: Uncertain

    Additional Comments: Looking for quiet along with consistent LEDs (in this case, all blue)

    Parts (w. links on newegg)
  • CPU: AMD FX-8150 Eight Core
  • Mobo: ASUS Crosshair V Formula
  • Case: CM Storm Sniper
  • CPU Cooler: Thermaltake Frio OCK
  • PSU: CM Silent Pro Hybrid 1050W
  • RAM: G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 16GB (4 x 4GB)
  • SSD (use for OS): Corsair Force Series GT
  • HDD (use for storage): WD Caviar Blue 500GB
  • Graphics Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 570 2560MB
  • Keyboard: Thermaltake eSPORTS Challenger Ultimate
  • Mouse: RAZER Orochi
  • Disk Drive: SAMSUNG Blue-ray Combo
  • Wireless Adapter: D-Link Extreme Desktop Adapter
  • RAM Cooler: ??

    Current Cost: $1,927.88
  • More about : input build

    February 18, 2012 7:06:55 AM

    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-cpu-review-o...

    Beyond that, ASUS makes great motherboards.

    Coolermaster makes marginal PSUs. Antec, Corsair, Seasonic, Silverstone, and XFX are trusted brands. 1000w is slight overkill, but will not hurt anything.

    8gb ram is plenty for a gaming rig. I would also check the ASUS approved memory list to see if that 2133 stuff is on it. Gskill is a good brand though.

    Many people are having issues with the 60 and 64gb SSDs filling up too fast. They will work, but will require constant file maintenance, and depending on usage, frequent deletion of excess. Even if you install programs to the HDD, they will still dump a bunch of stuff into the Windows directory. That is just the way Windows works.

    For this reason, most are opting for the 120-128gb SSDs. In any case, here is a good guide for setting things up. http://www.pcworld.com/article/237496/the_best_of_both_...

    In general, ram coolers are just for visual effect or "showing off" if you will.
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    February 18, 2012 8:08:03 AM

    dhcollegedude715 said:
    Hello Everyone,

    So I have been working on organizing parts to get for my first full build which I want to start in the next month or so. I have spent a good amount of time researching and would now like to hear what others have to say about the setup before I decide this is what I am going to order. There are very few limitations on parts other than that I am getting the AMD CPU which is listed below. Thank you in advance for any and all input. The following is all the information I have:

    Approximate Purchase Date: March/April

    Budget Range: Would like not to go over $2000

    System Usage from Most to Least Important: (sorted from most to least important)
  • Gaming
  • Watching movies
  • Surfing the internet

    Parts Not Required: Monitor

    Preferred Website(s) for Parts: newegg.com

    Country: U.S.A.

    Parts Preferences: AMD CPU is a must. Always liked nVidea and ASUS

    Overclocking: Most likely

    SLI or Crossfire: Maybe

    Monitor Resolution: Uncertain

    Additional Comments: Looking for quiet along with consistent LEDs (in this case, all blue)

    Parts (w. links on newegg)
  • CPU: AMD FX-8150 Eight Core
  • Mobo: ASUS Crosshair V Formula
  • Case: CM Storm Sniper
  • CPU Cooler: Thermaltake Frio OCK
  • PSU: CM Silent Pro Hybrid 1050W
  • RAM: G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 16GB (4 x 4GB)
  • SSD (use for OS): Corsair Force Series GT
  • HDD (use for storage): WD Caviar Blue 500GB
  • Graphics Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 570 2560MB
  • Keyboard: Thermaltake eSPORTS Challenger Ultimate
  • Mouse: RAZER Orochi
  • Disk Drive: SAMSUNG Blue-ray Combo
  • Wireless Adapter: D-Link Extreme Desktop Adapter
  • RAM Cooler: ??

    Current Cost: $1,927.88

  • Please don't take offense, but seeing how you came here for advice/approval I'l tell it to ya straight. As far as the PC components themselves, other than the case... the term "hose job" doesn't even begin to explain that build.

    First off the AMD cpu is a total flop. Google some reviews on it. Nobody on this site with an IQ above a peanut would recommend that cpu for gaming. That psu isn't one to be recommended on here, 1000w is total over kill for dual gtx 570's, and there is no need for 16 gigs of RAM. And $400 for a gtx 570?
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    February 18, 2012 8:24:49 AM

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    February 18, 2012 11:07:43 AM

    I thank you for your honesty. Since the AMD CPUs are sounding worse the more I read, I'll look in to Intel even though I really didn't want to. As for the 16GB of RAM, I knew it excessive right now, but I was unsure of how soon in the near future it would become useful. I can drop the PSU to the lower wattage one (Woot, saves some money). Is there a reason these forums are not fond of the CM PSUs?

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    February 18, 2012 11:19:03 AM

    Couple of questions on the second post.

    If I'm going to switch over to Intel and a board that supports PCI-E 3.0, would it be better to get a Radeon HD 7950 (like this one by MSI)

    Also, I noticed you stated a different CPU cooler. From what I've read it looks like the Frio is a better cooler. Am I mistaken?

    I'm sure I'll come up with some more questions as I look more into this.

    Thanks again.
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    February 18, 2012 11:31:59 AM

    tlmck said:
    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-cpu-review-o...

    Beyond that, ASUS makes great motherboards.

    Coolermaster makes marginal PSUs. Antec, Corsair, Seasonic, Silverstone, and XFX are trusted brands. 1000w is slight overkill, but will not hurt anything.

    8gb ram is plenty for a gaming rig. I would also check the ASUS approved memory list to see if that 2133 stuff is on it. Gskill is a good brand though.

    Many people are having issues with the 60 and 64gb SSDs filling up too fast. They will work, but will require constant file maintenance, and depending on usage, frequent deletion of excess. Even if you install programs to the HDD, they will still dump a bunch of stuff into the Windows directory. That is just the way Windows works.

    For this reason, most are opting for the 120-128gb SSDs. In any case, here is a good guide for setting things up. http://www.pcworld.com/article/237496/the_best_of_both_...

    In general, ram coolers are just for visual effect or "showing off" if you will.


    All good input. Thank you. Yes that particular board does support 2133. If I cut down some of the other costs, I will upgrade the SSD. What is your opinion on AMD vs Intel for gaming?
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    February 18, 2012 3:24:27 PM

    dhcollegedude715 said:
    All good input. Thank you. Yes that particular board does support 2133. If I cut down some of the other costs, I will upgrade the SSD. What is your opinion on AMD vs Intel for gaming?


    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/windows-7-hotfix-bu... <----- That cpu is a total dud. Google is your friend.
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    February 18, 2012 3:33:13 PM

    dhcollegedude715 said:
    Couple of questions on the second post.

    If I'm going to switch over to Intel and a board that supports PCI-E 3.0, would it be better to get a Radeon HD 7950 (like this one by MSI)

    Also, I noticed you stated a different CPU cooler. From what I've read it looks like the Frio is a better cooler. Am I mistaken?

    I'm sure I'll come up with some more questions as I look more into this.

    Thanks again.

    The CM silent pro psu's have gotten a few good reviews but normally CM psu's aren't to be recommended. PSU's to look for are Seasonic, Enermax, upper tier LEPA, Silverstone, Antec, Corsair, XFX, and PC Power & Cooling.

    If you go with the intel build you don't need a spendy cooler. That CM 212 EVO will get you to a nice 4.4 Ghz and anything past 4.4Ghz on these Intel Sandy Bridge cpu's nets you zero gain.

    That MSI 560 ti 448 core runs head to head with a gtx 580 when that 560 is over clocked. There's a few reviews on that particular MSI card and it's a beast. 750w will easily push two of those cards and leave you juice left over.
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    February 18, 2012 4:58:21 PM

    I am just going to toss this out, I have been an AMD user for years, starting with a 80486DX5-133mhz way back in 1995 to the 965BE which is sitting the closet right now. The reason it's on the shelf in the closet? See my signature for my current build. Finally went back to Intel after more than 16 years, and gotta say am glad I did. So long AMD, it has been a great ride, but time has come to jump into the other lane.
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    February 18, 2012 5:31:22 PM

    amd cpus are slower than intel and the fx's are KNOWN for having LOTS of compatibility issues i would HIGHLY reccomend and i5 2500k rather than ANY fx get this build here

    case: cooler master haf x 200$
    mobo: asus maximum IV gene-z 190$
    cpu: intel i7 2600k 330$
    cpu cooler: noctua nh-d14 90$
    video card: sapphire amd radeon hd 7970 560$
    ssd: ocz agility 3 120gb 170$
    hhd: wd caviar black 1.5tb 170$
    ram: g.skill ripjaws x series 8gb 47$
    psu: silverstone st85f-g 850w 155$
    optical drive: lg black 12x bd-rom 60$
    keyboard mouse combo: mk120 26$
    wireless adapter: belkin f7d2102 n300 26$

    total price: 2024$
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    February 18, 2012 5:45:42 PM

    xtremegamer2da-max said:
    amd cpus are slower than intel and the fx's are KNOWN for having LOTS of compatibility issues i would HIGHLY reccomend and i5 2500k rather than ANY fx get this build here

    case: cooler master haf x 200$
    mobo: asus maximum IV gene-z 190$
    cpu: intel i7 2600k 330$
    cpu cooler: noctua nh-d14 90$
    video card: sapphire amd radeon hd 7970 560$
    ssd: ocz agility 3 120gb 170$
    hhd: wd caviar black 1.5tb 170$
    ram: g.skill ripjaws x series 8gb 47$
    psu: silverstone st85f-g 850w 155$
    optical drive: lg black 12x bd-rom 60$
    keyboard mouse combo: mk120 26$
    wireless adapter: belkin f7d2102 n300 26$

    total price: 2024$

    That Asus Gene=z is a suckers board. It's a mATX board with horrible slot spacing for dual cards and it's a over priced rip off for a single card set up. No need for a 2600K in regards to gaming, and no need for that $90 Noctua for a SB build. That OCZ SSD you have up there is another hose job. Lots of faster and more dependable SSD's out there for cheaper. And you can get a cheaper 850w modular psu that's just as dependable ...Corsair and XFX...both manufactured by Seasonic.
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    Best solution

    February 19, 2012 12:10:47 AM

    dhcollegedude715 said:
    All good input. Thank you. Yes that particular board does support 2133. If I cut down some of the other costs, I will upgrade the SSD. What is your opinion on AMD vs Intel for gaming?


    The board may support 2133, but does it support that particular module? When you get into higher speed ram, everything just has to be just so for it to work correctly. Couple that with the fact that it is generally overclocked from a slower speed, you may or may not get what you pay for.

    The AMD question is why I posted the first link. I have used mostly AMD chips since my first AMD 386dx40(still one of the best ever made IMO). Based on Tom's and other sites testing, along with my own experience, AMD just makes no sense at all for gaming any more.

    I do have an undervolted quad core AMD Phenom II that runs my HTPC extremely well, but I used it overclocked for gaming before I got my i3-2100 and it is not even a fair contest. The lowly Intel walks all over it. I was going to upgrade to a i5-2500k later, but really do not see the need at this time. The i3-2100 is still much faster than I need.

    The deal with the CM PSUs is they just have a bad reputation for performance and failure, and typically they are not as advertised. If you look at their labeling, they often get creative with Ohm's Law. In other words, the numbers just do not match up. I have had two supposedly highly rated one of the last 10 years or so, and while they did work in lower applications, they would not work as advertized.

    I currently have a Bronze rated Coolermaster GX 450w running my HTPC with the quad core and integrated graphics. However, when I added a lowly AMD 6670 card, I had all sorts of problems including the system running at about half speed. Took out the card and it now runs like a champ. The issue is that it should have had no problem with such a low end video card if it was actually the specs claimed on the labeling. I have also answered numerous posts where a CM PSU was the culprit.

    Your chosen PSU would probably work all right for you. But given the fact that you have to pay a higher cost for it to be equal to the higher quality, lesser cost alternatives, it really makes no sense to buy it.
    Share
    February 19, 2012 1:19:31 AM

    tlmck said:
    The board may support 2133, but does it support that particular module? When you get into higher speed ram, everything just has to be just so for it to work correctly. Couple that with the fact that it is generally overclocked from a slower speed, you may or may not get what you pay for.

    The AMD question is why I posted the first link. I have used mostly AMD chips since my first AMD 386dx40(still one of the best ever made IMO). Based on Tom's and other sites testing, along with my own experience, AMD just makes no sense at all for gaming any more.

    I do have an undervolted quad core AMD Phenom II that runs my HTPC extremely well, but I used it overclocked for gaming before I got my i3-2100 and it is not even a fair contest. The lowly Intel walks all over it. I was going to upgrade to a i5-2500k later, but really do not see the need at this time. The i3-2100 is still much faster than I need.

    The deal with the CM PSUs is they just have a bad reputation for performance and failure, and typically they are not as advertised. If you look at their labeling, they often get creative with Ohm's Law. In other words, the numbers just do not match up. I have had two supposedly highly rated one of the last 10 years or so, and while they did work in lower applications, they would not work as advertized.

    I currently have a Bronze rated Coolermaster GX 450w running my HTPC with the quad core and integrated graphics. However, when I added a lowly AMD 6670 card, I had all sorts of problems including the system running at about half speed. Took out the card and it now runs like a champ. The issue is that it should have had no problem with such a low end video card if it was actually the specs claimed on the labeling. I have also answered numerous posts where a CM PSU was the culprit.

    Your chosen PSU would probably work all right for you. But given the fact that you have to pay a higher cost for it to be equal to the higher quality, lesser cost alternatives, it really makes no sense to buy it.


    I thank you for all the information. I've taken that all into consideration an remade the build. Check out the other thread I posted please. Thanks Again.
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    February 26, 2012 1:03:57 AM

    Best answer selected by dhcollegedude715.
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