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1000w AVR and 850w PSU

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  • Power Supplies
  • Components
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June 6, 2012 5:49:38 PM

Hello I'm building a gaming PC and i have a problem in my area sometimes there are power fluctuations so i'm planing in buying an avr with 1000w.
Here are the Specs of the computer

Motherboard: ASRock Z68 Extreme4 Gen3

CPU: Intel Core i7-2600K Processor LGA 1155

Video card: EVGA GeForce GTX670

Memory: 8GB G.Skill DDR3 1600MHz

Case: Corsair Obsidian 650D Aluminum Mid Tower ATX Enthusiast Computer Case

Storage: Seagate Barracuda 7200 500 GB SATA 6.0 Gb-s 16 MB Cache

SSD: Crucial 64 GB

Optical drive: LG SATA Super

Power Supply: OCZ ZX Series 850W Fully-Modular 80PLUS Gold High Performance Power Supply

So will the 1000w AVR should be fine with the 850w psu if not what kind of AVR should i get what are the wattage and the volts recommended for my gaming PC list them so i can just write it on a piece of paper and show it to a store that sells AVR's.
Please help me i'm new to this my friend of mine said i should get an avr to avoid damaging the computer and this is my very first build I don't want my first build to be damaged on the second week or the second month I just want my first build to be perfect and no worries.

More about : 1000w avr 850w psu

a c 719 ) Power supply
June 6, 2012 6:08:56 PM

Your 850watt PSU should newer see more load than 400-500watts with your configuration so 1000watts is plenty. I have never had an AVR and l never lost a computer component because of power outs.
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June 6, 2012 6:09:01 PM

Your whole rig shouldn't use more than 500W at full capacity.

For reference, in my sig the i7-930 uses 385W and the 3770 only 302W. Both at full CPU+GPU load, measured at the outlet. Doesn't include monitor.

Personally, I would opt for a UPS with AVR, something like this:
http://www.amazon.com/CyberPower-CP1350AVRLCD-Intellige...
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June 10, 2012 5:55:02 PM

pdxalex said:
Your whole rig shouldn't use more than 500W at full capacity.

For reference, in my sig the i7-930 uses 385W and the 3770 only 302W. Both at full CPU+GPU load, measured at the outlet. Doesn't include monitor.

Personally, I would opt for a UPS with AVR, something like this:
http://www.amazon.com/CyberPower-CP1350AVRLCD-Intellige...



Hi
I just bought two of those one for me and one for my little brother and I really appreciate it but I have more unanswered questions.

1.Do I just plug the power supply to the UPS/AVR and plug the AVR to the wall if so how can I do it?

2.What is the purpose of AVR's it really confuses me?

3.What is the difference between AVR and UPS?

4.How does the power supply differ to the AVR?

5.How will I know what kind of UPS/AVR I will need to buy for my different power supply For example my little brother has a 650w power supply will the AVR I just bought work for my little brothers power supply?

Please answer this questions I really need the information and I really need to know the answer to number 5 so that i know what kind of AVR I have to buy if I build another PC.Thank you and please reply back.
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June 10, 2012 6:50:31 PM

Yes, just plug your PC into the UPS/AVR and plug the UPS/AVR into the wall outlet. Your PC should run off the 'battery/surge' outlets. You can use the regular 'surge' outlets for non-essential devices such as a printer.

As the name implies, an AVR is primarily used to regulate voltage and protect your PC against power spikes and fluctuations in your city's electricity grid. A UPS is primarily to safeguard against complete power failures. The UPS contains a battery and can power your PC in the event of a power failure... long enough for you to save any work and properly shut down your PC so you don't risk losing or corrupting data. I think pretty much any UPS these days will also act as AVR.

The size of the UPS you need depends on the Wattage of your system, ie how much electric energy your PC actually consumes - not the rated Wattage of your PSU. The i7-3770 in my sig for example uses about 300W at full load, without the monitor. My PSU is rated for 750W. I could swap my 750W PSU and put in a 500W or 1200W PSU but my PC would still only use 300W. If I add my 24" monitor, it would be somewhere around 450W. Allow for some overhead, and I could select a 600W UPS. A bigger UPS would allow for more overhead and would power my PC a little longer in the event of a power failure.
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June 13, 2012 6:45:10 PM

pdxalex said:
Yes, just plug your PC into the UPS/AVR and plug the UPS/AVR into the wall outlet. Your PC should run off the 'battery/surge' outlets. You can use the regular 'surge' outlets for non-essential devices such as a printer.

As the name implies, an AVR is primarily used to regulate voltage and protect your PC against power spikes and fluctuations in your city's electricity grid. A UPS is primarily to safeguard against complete power failures. The UPS contains a battery and can power your PC in the event of a power failure... long enough for you to save any work and properly shut down your PC so you don't risk losing or corrupting data. I think pretty much any UPS these days will also act as AVR.

The size of the UPS you need depends on the Wattage of your system, ie how much electric energy your PC actually consumes - not the rated Wattage of your PSU. The i7-3770 in my sig for example uses about 300W at full load, without the monitor. My PSU is rated for 750W. I could swap my 750W PSU and put in a 500W or 1200W PSU but my PC would still only use 300W. If I add my 24" monitor, it would be somewhere around 450W. Allow for some overhead, and I could select a 600W UPS. A bigger UPS would allow for more overhead and would power my PC a little longer in the event of a power failure.


Hi
thank you for that information but I still don't understand how much electric energy my PC consumes can you teach me or give me a tool that does it for me and please teach me how to calculate or anything the electric energy my PC consumes.
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Best solution

June 13, 2012 9:11:31 PM

I use one of these to measure Watts at the outlet:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

With it I tested my PC's energy consumption at idle, full CPU and GPU loads, checked my monitor, etc. It provides a lot of insight, particularly as I've been running both PCs 24/7 at full load for folding@home.

Alternatively, you can estimate your total Wattage by checking the specs of your individual components and consulting the manufacturers' websites, etc. There are also some online calculators:
http://images10.newegg.com/BizIntell/tool/psucalc/index...
http://support.asus.com/powersupply.aspx
The calculators above only suggest PSU requirements though, not your PC's actual consumption. I just did a quick google search, you can probably find other/better calculators. How much energy you consume naturally also depends on whether or not you overclock your CPU / GPU.
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June 16, 2012 12:38:28 AM

Best answer selected by AHHaNoOb23.
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