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**The Ultimate Modem/Router Setup Thread**

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March 9, 2011 12:37:58 AM

***The Ultimate Modem/Router Setup Thread***

This thread will outline the following:

- How to Cascade your Router (Run 2 Routers in the same subnet)

- How to run a Triple Router Y-Configuration (2 Routers connected to a Master Router and have the subnets separated by their WAN ports)

- Chain two networks together in a Cascading fashion (Bridging LAN to WAN)

Including:


-PPPoE setup from Router and using Modem to establish
connection to ISP

-PPPoA setup on Modem and Bridging to WAN port of Router


Important facts:

- I will be referring to the subnet as being 192.168.1.1. If your subnet is otherwise, simply adapt your IP address to my instructions
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


CASCADING A ROUTER (Same subnet)
Have you ever wondered how you could use an old router to extend your networks capablities? Why let such a useful peice of equipment go to waste?

This section will show you how to have a second router connected to your network (LAN to LAN) and utilize the LAN and Wireless functions of the router to extend your networks capabilities.

Second Router (Slave Router)

The process starts on your Second Router first.

Firstly, connect your computers LAN port Directly to any of the LAN ports on your router (2nd Router) via an ethernet cable.

Firstly start by loading up your configuration page of your router.

To do this, look on the bottom of your router, and there should be a default gateway and a Username and Password. Enter the default gateway into your internet browser and use the credentials on the bottom of your router.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
If there is no information on the bottom of your router, do the following:


1 - Press Windows Key + R at the same time
2 - Type "cmd" without the quotes and click Run
3 - Type "ipconfig" once cmd is open
4 - Note down the IP address under Default Gateway

Type the IP address you noted down in your Internet Browser

It may ask you for a Username and Password

For a Netgear:
Username = admin
Password = password

For a Linksys:
Username = admin
Password = admin

To properly find the correct Username and Password for your router, visit http://portforward.com and find Username and Password that corresponds to your router model
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Once the configuration page is open, the first step is to set the routers DNS server to the IP address of your first router (Master), in this case my first router has an IP address of 192.168.1.1, so set your primary and secondary DNS to 192.168.1.1 (or whatever applies to your setup, may be 192.168.0.1)

The next step is to change the IP address of your Slave router to one increment higher than your first router(Master),
e.g Master Router = 192.168.1.1, so Slave Router = 192.168.1.2


All you really need to do is turn DHCP off, as your master router will assign the IP addresses (hence the "Slave" term)

Once complete, disconnect the Ethernet cable between your Slave router, and connect your PC straight to the Master router (This should be the first time you connected to your master router in this whole process)

First Router (Master) (192.168.1.1)

Access the configuration page, similarly to the way in which done previously.

Change the DHCP range of the router(Master) from 192.168.1.2-254, to 192.169.1.3-254, so the address range is one increment above the Slave routers IP address.

So this means that the Slave router is not in the master routers DHCP address range.

Now finally, run a LAN cable directly from a LAN port of the Slave router to the LAN port of the Master router.

All done:) 

____________________________________________________________________________________


Running a Triple Router Y-Configuration (Devices on each network separated by their WAN ports)

This setup is by far my favourite. It works by having a Master Modem/Router (192.168.1.1) connected to the Internet, and having two Slave Routers cascaded off it LAN to WAN, and the separation of users occurs because of the Firewall between the two Router's WAN ports.
I know many people have asked, how do you create two Networks with separate subnets, so Wireless users are separated from HardWired users. This is handy when your in a Business or School environment, and you would like to prevent temporary users from reaking havoc on your network.

Firstly connect an Ethernet cable from each Slave routers WAN ports to a LAN port of th Master router.

Master Router

Step 1 Setup up your Username and Password for PPPoA/E on your Master Router
Step 2 Assign a static IP address to Slave 1 (Slave Router 1), in this case assign it the static IP of 192.168.1.2
Step 3 Assign a static IP address to Slave 2 (Slave Router 2) of 192.168.1.3
Step 4 Turn wireless off
Step 5 Turn DHCP off

Slave 1

Step 1 Set the router subnet to 192.168.2.x
Step 2 Set the DNS to the IP of the Master Router (192.168.1.1)
Step 1 Make sure DHCP is enabled

Slave 2

Step 1 Set the router subnet to 192.168.3.x
Step 2 Set the DNS to the IP of the Master Router (192.168.1.1)
Step 3 Make sure DHCP is enabled

That's it!!!
Now the devices on each routers subnets are separated by their dedicated WAN ports!!!

___________________________________________________________________________________

Chaining Two Networks Together In a Cascading Fashion (Modem handles PPPoA)

There are many, many ways to accomplish this setup, but I will first outline the way I have personally done it. This setup will work if your Router does not support PPPoA, but will work using PPPoE aswell. The ISP sign-on is left for the modem, and then cascaded or bridged LAN to WAN, to the router

Now with my setup, 192.168.1.1 is my Router subnet, and 192.168.2.1 is my Modem's subnet.
The devices I used in my setup were the Netgear DG834G(Turned into Modem only) and Linksys E3000(Router), but I'm sure you can adapt this setup to your router quite easily.
This process can be difficult, but I will try and explain as clearly as possible.


The Router handles the following:

  • DHCP IP handouts
  • Port Forwarding
  • NAT Firewall
  • DMZ
  • Wireless and Such
  • Basic router functions

    The Modem will handle the following

  • PPPoA sign-on
  • Complete connection to ISP
  • DNS servers
  • DMZ and Completely Opened Firewall

    Modem Configuration

    Your old Modem/Router is going to act as a DUMB modem.

    Step 1: Firstly connect an Ethernet cable directly from your Router's (E3000) WAN port to a LAN port on the Modem (DG834G)
    Step 2: Connect an Ethernet cable from the Modem to your pc.
    Step 3: Open up the configuration page of your Modem/Router (Netgear)
    Step 4: Change the subnet to 192.168.1.1, you will then have to browse to 192.168.1.1 to load up the configuration page again, if you indeed had to actually change the subnet.
    Step 5: Go to LAN IP setup(Applies to a Netgear device) or otherwise called Static DHCP, where you can assign a static IP to an attached device
    Step 6: Next, because the Router(E3000) is connected to the modem, set a Static IP for the E3000's WAN port to something in the Modems DHCP address range e.g 192.168.1.2
    Step 7: Next turn wireless off
    Step 8: Setup DNS servers if you feel like it
    Step 9: Turn your firewall and NAT off
    Step 10: DMZ to your Router IP (10.2.2.3) (Just for the sake of it)
    Step 11: Make sure all your ISP details are entered for PPPoA and such, meaning the Username and Password your ISP gave to you.
    Step 12: Turn DHCP off

    Thats the steps complete for configuring your Modem, after this point, you cannot connect a device directly to the modem unless you force an IP to be assigned, as DHCP is off.

    Disconnect all ethernet cables, and run one Ethernet cable from your PC straight to a LAN port of the Router(E3000)

    Router Configuration (E3000)

    The router is going to handle DHCP, Firewall and NAT and router functions, here are the steps:

    Step 1: Open the E3000 configuration page
    Step 2: Make sure DHCP is on
    Step 3: Change the routers subnet to 192.168.2.1, then re-access the configuration page at 192.168.2.1.
    Step 4: Set the DHCP range to 192.168.2.2 to 192.168.2.254
    Step 5: Set the Primary and Secondary DNS to the IP of your Modem (In this case, 192.168.1.1)

    Thats pretty much it for the configuration of the Router, so run an Ethernet cable from your Routers WAN port to a LAN port on your modem (Netgear)

    Restart your Router and Modem, and check to see if everything works
    ___________________________________________________________________________________________


    Chaining Two Networks Together in a Cascading Fashion (PPPoE configuration from the Router (E3000))

    This process, is almost exactly the same as the instructions covered in the section just before this.

    The only difference is that you can setup your PPPoE configuration from your Router (E3000) and use your modem to make the connection. This process will comes in handy when your ISP actually natively supports PPPoE, because some ISP's don't. If your ISP does support PPPoE, I would definitely go with this setup over the above one. You could essentially use PPPoA on your Router, but because there are limited Routers that support this function, I had to make the section above.

    Here are the instructions, very similar to the above section.

    Modem Configuration

    Your old Modem/Router is going to act as a DUMB modem.

    Step 1: Firstly connect an Ethernet cable directly from your Router's (E3000) WAN port to a LAN port on the Modem (DG834G)
    Step 2: Connect an Ethernet cable from the Modem to your pc.
    Step 3: Open up the configuration page of your Modem/Router (Netgear)
    Step 4: Change the subnet to 192.168.1.1, you will then have to browse to 192.168.1.1 to load up the configuration page again, that's if you had to actually change the subnet.
    Step 5: Make sure the DHCP range is set to 192.168.1.2 to 192.168.1.254
    Step 6: Go to LAN IP setup(Applies to a Netgear device) or otherwise called Static DHCP, where you can assign a static IP to an attached device
    Step 7: Next, because the Router(E3000) is connected to the modem, set a Static IP for the E3000's WAN port to something in the Modems DHCP address range e.g 192.168.1.2
    Step 8: Next turn wireless off
    Step 9: Setup DNS servers if you feel like it
    Step 10: Turn your firewall and NAT off
    Step 11: DMZ to your Router IP (192.168.1.2)
    Step 12: Make sure all your ISP details are entered for PPPoA and such, meaning the Username and Password your ISP gave to you.
    Step 12: Make sure you wipe out all the information in the Basic Settings section (In the Basic Settings section for a Netgear) that contains your Username and Password for your ISP TCP/IP configuration, as your Router will be handling the TCP/IP configuration
    Step 13: Turn DHCP off

    Thats the steps complete for configuring your Modem, after this point, you cannot connect a device directly to the modem unless you force an IP to be assigned, as DHCP is off.

    Disconnect all ethernet cables, and run one Ethernet cable from your PC straight to a LAN port of the Router(E3000)


    Router Configuration (E3000)

    The router is going to handle DHCP, Firewall and NAT and router functions, here are the steps:

    Step 1: Open the E3000 configuration page
    Step 2: Make sure DHCP is on
    Step 3: Change the routers subnet to 192.168.2.1, then re-access the configuration page at 192.168.2.1.
    Step 4: Set the DHCP range to 192.168.2.2 to 192.168.2.254
    Step 5: Set the Primary and Secondary DNS to the IP of your Modem (In this case, 192.168.1.1)
    Step 6: Configure your TCP/IP configuration for your Username and Password (PPPoE Username and Password)

    Thats pretty much it for the configuration of the Router, so run an Ethernet cable from your Routers WAN port to a LAN port on your modem (Netgear)

    Your PPPoE setup from your Router is now complete!!!!
    _____________________________________________________________________________________________

    There is a slightly alternative way to do this (Only works if your ISP supports PPPoE)

    Put your Modem (Netgear) into Full Bridge Mode or Modem only mode

    For Netgear:

    http://DefaultGateway/setup.cgi?next_file=mode.htm

    Where for DefaultGateway you put the Default Gateway for your Netgear router in there, which is the same IP address you use to access its configuration page

    Step 1: Choose from the drop down menu the option "Modem Only"
    Step 2: Let it do its thing, and then restart the modem. (Do not try and access its configuration page as I believe it deactivates Modem only mode)
    Step 3: Once the Netgear has restart, connect a LAN cable from one of the Netgears LAN ports straight to the WAN port of your router
    Step 4: Setup your TCP/IP information (PPPoE) on your Router
    Step 5: Setup your DNS servers
    Step 6: Setup the Router almost as if it has its own built-in Modem

    That's pretty much it for that alternative. I would definitely say that this process is much easier to follow and perform, but the other process gives you more control over how you want it setup
    March 17, 2011 1:01:35 AM

    Thanks a bunch man, this really helped me set up my new router/modem.
    March 17, 2011 1:14:05 AM

    No problem!!
    Related resources
    May 22, 2011 2:40:17 PM

    Is it possible to go chain a Master Router LAN to a Slave Router WAN like this?:
    Master Router LAN port 1 => 192.168.11.4 => Slave Router WAN... then:
    Slave Router LAN port 4 => 192.168.11.10

    I want to use all 4 ports of the Slave Router for a PlayStation 3, Blu-Ray, and 2 PCs. I want the 2 PCs on a network domain. The Master Router has an attached Windows Server 2008 R2.
    May 23, 2011 4:00:34 AM

    I'll be 5 minutes, just changing classes, then I'll reply
    May 23, 2011 4:18:42 AM

    Ok, sorry about that.

    Ok, so with the proposed setup of LAN(Master) to WAN(Slave), the devices under the slaves subnet, will see your server fine, but the server will not be able to see your devices under the slave subnet, which will be very annoying.

    Is there a reason you require this separation?

    Please detail your situation and what you require, as I can most likely propose some solutions for you.

    Thanks
    Axxeon
    May 23, 2011 6:20:18 AM

    axxeon said:
    Ok, sorry about that.

    Ok, so with the proposed setup of LAN(Master) to WAN(Slave), the devices under the slaves subnet, will see your server fine, but the server will not be able to see your devices under the slave subnet, which will be very annoying.

    Is there a reason you require this separation?

    Please detail your situation and what you require, as I can most likely propose some solutions for you.

    Thanks
    Axxeon


    Thanks for the response, I spelled out my home network situation in gory detail here: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/26276-41-crazy-home-n...

    The reason for the separation is mostly due to the large amount of network capable devices in the house. I don't know any switches or hubs, just 3 wireless routers. I know I can use a LAN to LAN connection and use the routers as hubs, but there is already an absurd amount of wiring and clutter going. I'd prefer to keep it as simple as possible hardware-wise and just use the 2 routers I already ran Cat5e for. If we need to, we could connect the 3rd router to achieve our goals though. With all the testosterone flying around in the house, I might be able to teach one of these guys how to use a mason bit and drill some more holes... I just don't want the landlord to upset about it, haha.

    "the devices under the slaves subnet, will see your server fine, but the server will not be able to see your devices under the slave subnet, which will be very annoying."

    Right now, I can't do either. The server is connected to the master router and doesn't see anything connected to the slave router. I have the Master Router using 192.168.11.1 => Lan Port to Wan Port of the Slave router using 192.168.12.1; also, the computers connected to the Slave Router can't see what's connected to the Master Router, but interestingly enough, I CAN access the Master Router configuration through the computers connected to the slave router using 192.168.11.1 in a browser address bar. I think this is because I have the router capable of remote administration and it's simply connecting via the web.

    If I am able to connect to the Master Router admin through the web, then I was thinking there may be a way to set up the PCs connected to the Slave Router to connect via the web via the Windows Domain Server, or a VPN... maybe Terminal Services/Remote Desktop Connection? That wouldn't be ideal, but it could be a workaround until we bite the bullet and set up the 3rd router if what configuration I am proposing IS impossible.

    As far as internet connectivity, everything is running AWESOME. Great speeds, great reliability, and having the PS3, Blu-Ray, and PC wired directly to the Slave Router on the network as solved the skipping NetFlix and Media Server streams that were driving us crazy. Every device in the house has great internet speeds considering we have a modest bandwidth package of 10Mbps down / 1Mbps up though now that we have our new room mate in the far bedroom on the opposite side of the house from my room where the cable model connects to the Master Router, we may upgrade it to the next step up since we all tend to be home and watching movies and other bandwidth intensive activities at the same time.

    Anyway... I don't absolutely need every device to be seen from the server, I could do without the PS3, the Blu-Ray player, and any smartphones, but I'd like to create a Windows Domain that we can all use to login with our User Names and Passwords on the "Community PC" in the living room that connects to the TV. It would also be nice to be able to use our laptops to login with the same User/Password as we do on our PC and have a Roaming Profile like an office or college.

    Basically I was wondering if I set up the Slave Router to use 192.168.11.10 as it's Internet IP Address, would I be able to disable the DCHP of the Slave and give it an IP range of 192.168.11.11-20 ? As in, the internet IP Address of the Slave Router is on the same subnet as the Master Router? I don't think it is possible because the WAN port usually divides the network, but I wanted to know for sure by asking here. I COULD use a LAN to LAN setup, but I'd have to use the old 3rd router that is in my closet just to hook up one extra device that needs to be hardwired, and I'd rather not.
    May 23, 2011 8:40:40 AM

    Great explanation.
    Just before we go ahead, please list the brand and model of your routers/modem.

    Ideas in mind/replies:

    1. The reason you can access your master from a device on the slave is because the Slave router is technically a member of the Masters subnet, it's that simple.
    That is why you cannot access the devices on the slave from the master, because the slave is treated as a device, and the devices are all in a separate subnet and firewalled. Think of it as a big office in the city with one way mirror windows, You can see out, but not back in. There would be multiple rooms inside the building, but the people outside are unaware of that, and see it as just one building. (Bad analogy but I hope you get what I'm saying)

    2. I believe there may be an option in some routers, to use the WAN port as a LAN port, which Is really handy.

    Anyways, please get back to me

    Thanks
    Axxeon
    June 19, 2011 9:18:47 PM

    I am moving an would like to build a network right from the start. I am currently running an E3000 off a cable internet modem. My desktop is hardwired to this router. My netbook is sometimes hardwired, sometimes Wifi. My old WRT54G is cascaded to run all of our Wifi phones, iPods, etc. I use the E3000 Wireless connection strictly for streaming HD media content to my HTPC in an adjacent room. I have the AE1000 Wifi adapter but it still doesn't get a strong enough 5GHz signal.

    My new problems and issues:
    1. I will have satellite internet access. I haven't worked with this at all but I understand it makes a difference on DHCP vs PPoe configuration?
    2. I will have a two story house and need to extend my wireless range. My modem will be on the ground floor but my office PC and the HTPC will be in the basement.
    3. I would like remote access to the network. I need to be able to access my desktop from work and vice versa. I would eventually like to add Wifi security cameras on the network that could be accessed remotely as well.

    My current hardware is listed above. In addition, I plan to need another router. I am looking at the E4200 as the E3000 has overheating->disconnection issues. I would be happy to spend the equivalent on a couple of Cisco Valet Plus access points if that would work better? I would also be willing to use an old desktop as a dedicated server, attempt to add a NAS unit, or add external storage to the routers, if necessary. I have looked at these options but am reluctant to start blindly buying hardware without some instruction.

    Please let me know what you think would be the best configuration and I will research the cost and complexity.

    Thanks,
    Mike
    June 19, 2011 11:55:46 PM

    Ok. I can't quite give you a detailed recommendation just at this minute as I'm on my iPhone, in an hour or so I will do so, but in the mean time I've read your situation and I have these questions:

    1. Is your whole home network relying on 3G or is mostly ADSL, and a separate computer on 3G?

    2. What modem do you have?

    3. Your currently running 2 routers, the E3000 and WRT54G, is that correct?


    Also, please outline the following:

    1. Your aim or achievement of the network
    2. The main use of the network
    3. The features you are critical of in the networking (range, speed etc)
    4. What kind of performance do you expect?
    5. Price range
    6. How many devices in the house
    --------------------------------------------

    It is likely you won't be able to answer those questions before I see to replying(in an hour or so), but my reply will be of much more quality and understanding with those questions answered beforing doing so.


    Thanks
    Matt Scaffidi


    June 20, 2011 3:04:00 AM

    No 3G in the house. Everything is on the same internet connection. If it were to start sucking too much bandwidth, I could use 3G but I havent had that problem yet.

    I have a Moto Surfboard but that is another thing I am planning to update.

    I am currently running those two routers but the idea was to seclude the E3000 for the media network. Now I am hoping to extend the range and be able to stream HD media w/o lag.

    I am hoping to have a simple to manage and maintain network that will allow everything I mentioned with room for expansions such as the Wifi security cameras. In total I will have a desktop, the HTPC, possibly a server (if it is beneficial), a PS3, a Wifi reciever &/or Wifi TV, two wifi phones, and two or three laptops. I plan to spend a few hundred, if necessary, to get the right network started instead of cobbling it together as I go.
    June 20, 2011 4:22:17 AM

    So are you looking on how to set it all up, or what to buy etc?
    June 20, 2011 6:34:55 AM

    Both. I'm sure there are going to be a few opinions about what will work best. I would really like to know what people here think I will need to buy. When explaining what I will need I'm sure I will get an understanding of how to setup as well as proposed benefits. I only know how to do what I mentioned above and while trial and error might be the best way to learn my only fear is the time and money I would spend.
    June 20, 2011 6:52:52 AM

    Okay, well

    I would grab the E4200, definitely. And have that as your main router.

    Bridge the connection from your modem to your router. Because the E4200 has 6 antennae, and operates on 'simultaneous' dual bands, your iPod and Wireless devices will operate on the 2.4GHz range, while the HTPC will operate flawlessly, with no interference on the 5GHz range.

    I would recommend getting a new 5GHz Wireless-N adapter for the HTPC, as there is no point having such an advanced router such as the E4200, and be bottle-necked by the receiving end.

    There is no problem having all your devices connected to one router, as the E4200 has 6 antennae, it'll handle your HD streaming and daily tasks 'like a boss'.


    It is ALWAYS essential that your modem and router are updated to the latest firmware, as the hardware can only operate as good as the software allows it to.

    If your looking for router functionality, it's probably best to get one of the more up to date E3000's and chuck Tomato firmware on it. This would allow you to get the most functionality out of your router, and not limit it to what the manufacturer has set it to.

    It just depends what you want to do. If I were you, I would go with the E4200, as that router is boss, but the reason I also recommended the E3000 is because Tomato isn't compatible with the E4200, therefore the E3000 boasts more software fuctionality, where is the E4200 boasts more hardware functionality.


    Let me know,
    Matt Scaffidi
    June 20, 2011 11:13:08 AM

    I will get the E4200 then so that I can have dual band signals on both floors of the house. Then, if I have weak signal anwhere I can use the WRT54GS to repeat the signal in that area? Will flashing to Tomato on the two slave routers cause any problems with using the E4200 as the main router?

    How would you address network storage? Currently, I have all of my media on my desktop so that I can boot the HTPC from a SSD. I can put a HDD in the HTPC and transfer all of the media to it. Or would it be better to put media on a NAS or external HDD attached to the router? The goal would be to have access to the files no matter which machine I am on, without having to go wakeup another machine. I have tried Wake on LAN for my desktop but haven't had any success and eventually have to walk in a wake the desktop to stream media to the HTPC. I don't want to do that if there are stairs involved!

    Thanks,
    Mike
    June 20, 2011 12:17:00 PM

    Hmm, well....

    What you can do is install a wake on LAN program(have a goog) which can send the wake on LAN command to the HTPC from any other pc in the house, but... The E4200 'may' have WOL features included in it's software, which would make things SO much easier, that's exactly how I've got things running with my E3000 tomato:) )

    As for extending the wireless signal, I have an E3000 and a MASSIVE house and I have no issues with signal, so with you E4200, you should have NO problems:) 

    But if you did need to extend the wireless signal, you could do that, but it'll slow your network down to half speed for any devices on the repeated signal, as it's collecting an then relaying the data. I think repeating is actually really messy and I have previously had no luck. Your just lining yourself up for more issues, whether it be compatibility or performance.

    Thanks,
    Matt Scaffidi
    June 20, 2011 10:08:24 PM

    Maybe I do just need a different Wifi receiver. I thought the AE1000 was going to be good with the E3000 but the 5GHz is zero to one bars at a distance of 35ft with an interior drywall wall between line of site. I currently don't even utilize the 5GHz signal. The 2.4GHz is great all over this house. The new house is not MASSIVE but there will be double that distance and another floor to cover.
    Is it possible I have the settings wrong on the 5GHz signal? I am flashing Tomato today to see if that helps. If not I will order the E4200 and have it installed in the new house around this time next week (I move in over the weekend).
    I think I have gone away from the idea of a repeater and will try to run a Cat6 cable to cascade one router to the basement from the main floor.
    I will keep you updated. If anyone would like to suggest better Wifi receivers or WOL programs, I would appreciate it.

    Mike
    June 20, 2011 11:11:54 PM

    The E4200, 'IS' the best Wifi Receiver (I'm assuming my Wifi Receiver you mean Router) you can get, In my opinion

    Thanks,
    Matt Scaffidi
    June 21, 2011 1:24:14 AM

    No, I mean Wifi adapter. Sorry for the confusion. The E3000 is on the modem and is located within 35ft of the AE1000 adapter and they still won't connect on the 5GHz channel. BTW, I flashed to Tomato on the E3000. I will retry with the new firmware for the 5GHz strength. Also, I didn't find the WOL option. Can this be done via Wifi? If not, there is extra incentive to run a cable through the floor of the new house.
    June 21, 2011 1:39:04 AM

    OMG, I can't believe I forgot about that....

    WOL will only work for hardwired PC's, not wireless..Also the WOL option is under

    Tools> WOL

    Thanks,
    Matt Scaffidi
    June 21, 2011 3:21:02 AM

    Not a problem. So is there a Wifi WOL solution?
    BTW I installed TomatoUSB and have had one disconnection already, the router was very hot so I assume it is the same overheating problem that I attribute past problems to. I was also unable, after reconnecting the internet, to get the 5GHz channel to connect to the HTPC. I can still connect with the 2.4GHz. The 5GHz won't even attempt... it doesn't ask for a password, despite showing 2 bars of signal it just goes to the troubleshooting wizard in Win7. Any ideas?
    June 21, 2011 4:24:56 AM

    Well, replace the E3000 under warranty. You'll get a brand new updated model for free. The disconnections are a worry, so definitely get it replaced.

    As for Wireless-WOL, it's best to use a program for that, as you'll be able to wake a pc, wired or not.


    Thanks,
    Matt Scaffidi


    June 29, 2011 6:06:29 AM

    axxeon said:
    ***The Ultimate Modem/Router Setup Thread***

    This thread will outline the following:

    - How to Cascade your Router (Run 2 Routers in the same subnet)

    - How to run a Triple Router Y-Configuration (2 Routers connected to a Master Router and have the subnets separated by their WAN ports)

    - Chain two networks together in a Cascading fashion (Bridging LAN to WAN)

    Including:


    -PPPoE setup from Router and using Modem to establish
    connection to ISP

    -PPPoA setup on Modem and Bridging to WAN port of Router


    Important facts:

    - I will be referring to the subnet as being 192.168.1.1. If your subnet is otherwise, simply adapt your IP address to my instructions
    _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


    CASCADING A ROUTER (Same subnet)
    Have you ever wondered how you could use an old router to extend your networks capablities? Why let such a useful peice of equipment go to waste?

    This section will show you how to have a second router connected to your network (LAN to LAN) and utilize the LAN and Wireless functions of the router to extend your networks capabilities.

    Second Router (Slave Router)

    The process starts on your Second Router first.

    Firstly, connect your computers LAN port Directly to any of the LAN ports on your router (2nd Router) via an ethernet cable.

    Firstly start by loading up your configuration page of your router.

    To do this, look on the bottom of your router, and there should be a default gateway and a Username and Password. Enter the default gateway into your internet browser and use the credentials on the bottom of your router.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    If there is no information on the bottom of your router, do the following:


    1 - Press Windows Key + R at the same time
    2 - Type "cmd" without the quotes and click Run
    3 - Type "ipconfig" once cmd is open
    4 - Note down the IP address under Default Gateway

    Type the IP address you noted down in your Internet Browser

    It may ask you for a Username and Password

    For a Netgear:
    Username = admin
    Password = password

    For a Linksys:
    Username = admin
    Password = admin

    To properly find the correct Username and Password for your router, visit http://portforward.com and find Username and Password that corresponds to your router model
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Once the configuration page is open, the first step is to set the routers DNS server to the IP address of your first router (Master), in this case my first router has an IP address of 192.168.1.1, so set your primary and secondary DNS to 192.168.1.1 (or whatever applies to your setup, may be 192.168.0.1)

    The next step is to change the IP address of your Slave router to one increment higher than your first router(Master),
    e.g Master Router = 192.168.1.1, so Slave Router = 192.168.1.2


    All you really need to do is turn DHCP off, as your master router will assign the IP addresses (hence the "Slave" term)

    Once complete, disconnect the Ethernet cable between your Slave router, and connect your PC straight to the Master router (This should be the first time you connected to your master router in this whole process)

    First Router (Master) (192.168.1.1)

    Access the configuration page, similarly to the way in which done previously.

    Change the DHCP range of the router(Master) from 192.168.1.2-254, to 192.169.1.3-254, so the address range is one increment above the Slave routers IP address.

    So this means that the Slave router is not in the master routers DHCP address range.

    Now finally, run a LAN cable directly from a LAN port of the Slave router to the LAN port of the Master router.

    All done:) 

    ____________________________________________________________________________________


    Running a Triple Router Y-Configuration (Devices on each network separated by their WAN ports)

    This setup is by far my favourite. It works by having a Master Modem/Router (192.168.1.1) connected to the Internet, and having two Slave Routers cascaded off it LAN to WAN, and the separation of users occurs because of the Firewall between the two Router's WAN ports.
    I know many people have asked, how do you create two Networks with separate subnets, so Wireless users are separated from HardWired users. This is handy when your in a Business or School environment, and you would like to prevent temporary users from reaking havoc on your network.

    Firstly connect an Ethernet cable from each Slave routers WAN ports to a LAN port of th Master router.

    Master Router

    Step 1 Setup up your Username and Password for PPPoA/E on your Master Router
    Step 2 Assign a static IP address to Slave 1 (Slave Router 1), in this case assign it the static IP of 192.168.1.2
    Step 3 Assign a static IP address to Slave 2 (Slave Router 2) of 192.168.1.3
    Step 4 Turn wireless off
    Step 5 Turn DHCP off

    Slave 1

    Step 1 Set the router subnet to 192.168.2.x
    Step 2 Set the DNS to the IP of the Master Router (192.168.1.1)
    Step 1 Make sure DHCP is enabled

    Slave 2

    Step 1 Set the router subnet to 192.168.3.x
    Step 2 Set the DNS to the IP of the Master Router (192.168.1.1)
    Step 3 Make sure DHCP is enabled

    That's it!!!
    Now the devices on each routers subnets are separated by their dedicated WAN ports!!!

    ___________________________________________________________________________________

    Chaining Two Networks Together In a Cascading Fashion (Modem handles PPPoA)

    There are many, many ways to accomplish this setup, but I will first outline the way I have personally done it. This setup will work if your Router does not support PPPoA, but will work using PPPoE aswell. The ISP sign-on is left for the modem, and then cascaded or bridged LAN to WAN, to the router

    Now with my setup, 192.168.1.1 is my Router subnet, and 192.168.2.1 is my Modem's subnet.
    The devices I used in my setup were the Netgear DG834G(Turned into Modem only) and Linksys E3000(Router), but I'm sure you can adapt this setup to your router quite easily.
    This process can be difficult, but I will try and explain as clearly as possible.


    The Router handles the following:

  • DHCP IP handouts
  • Port Forwarding
  • NAT Firewall
  • DMZ
  • Wireless and Such
  • Basic router functions

    The Modem will handle the following

  • PPPoA sign-on
  • Complete connection to ISP
  • DNS servers
  • DMZ and Completely Opened Firewall

    Modem Configuration

    Your old Modem/Router is going to act as a DUMB modem.

    Step 1: Firstly connect an Ethernet cable directly from your Router's (E3000) WAN port to a LAN port on the Modem (DG834G)
    Step 2: Connect an Ethernet cable from the Modem to your pc.
    Step 3: Open up the configuration page of your Modem/Router (Netgear)
    Step 4: Change the subnet to 192.168.1.1, you will then have to browse to 192.168.1.1 to load up the configuration page again, if you indeed had to actually change the subnet.
    Step 5: Go to LAN IP setup(Applies to a Netgear device) or otherwise called Static DHCP, where you can assign a static IP to an attached device
    Step 6: Next, because the Router(E3000) is connected to the modem, set a Static IP for the E3000's WAN port to something in the Modems DHCP address range e.g 192.168.1.2
    Step 7: Next turn wireless off
    Step 8: Setup DNS servers if you feel like it
    Step 9: Turn your firewall and NAT off
    Step 10: DMZ to your Router IP (10.2.2.3) (Just for the sake of it)
    Step 11: Make sure all your ISP details are entered for PPPoA and such, meaning the Username and Password your ISP gave to you.
    Step 12: Turn DHCP off

    Thats the steps complete for configuring your Modem, after this point, you cannot connect a device directly to the modem unless you force an IP to be assigned, as DHCP is off.

    Disconnect all ethernet cables, and run one Ethernet cable from your PC straight to a LAN port of the Router(E3000)

    Router Configuration (E3000)

    The router is going to handle DHCP, Firewall and NAT and router functions, here are the steps:

    Step 1: Open the E3000 configuration page
    Step 2: Make sure DHCP is on
    Step 3: Change the routers subnet to 192.168.2.1, then re-access the configuration page at 192.168.2.1.
    Step 4: Set the DHCP range to 192.168.2.2 to 192.168.2.254
    Step 5: Set the Primary and Secondary DNS to the IP of your Modem (In this case, 192.168.1.1)

    Thats pretty much it for the configuration of the Router, so run an Ethernet cable from your Routers WAN port to a LAN port on your modem (Netgear)

    Restart your Router and Modem, and check to see if everything works
    ___________________________________________________________________________________________


    Chaining Two Networks Together in a Cascading Fashion (PPPoE configuration from the Router (E3000))

    This process, is almost exactly the same as the instructions covered in the section just before this.

    The only difference is that you can setup your PPPoE configuration from your Router (E3000) and use your modem to make the connection. This process will comes in handy when your ISP actually natively supports PPPoE, because some ISP's don't. If your ISP does support PPPoE, I would definitely go with this setup over the above one. You could essentially use PPPoA on your Router, but because there are limited Routers that support this function, I had to make the section above.

    Here are the instructions, very similar to the above section.

    Modem Configuration

    Your old Modem/Router is going to act as a DUMB modem.

    Step 1: Firstly connect an Ethernet cable directly from your Router's (E3000) WAN port to a LAN port on the Modem (DG834G)
    Step 2: Connect an Ethernet cable from the Modem to your pc.
    Step 3: Open up the configuration page of your Modem/Router (Netgear)
    Step 4: Change the subnet to 192.168.1.1, you will then have to browse to 192.168.1.1 to load up the configuration page again, that's if you had to actually change the subnet.
    Step 5: Make sure the DHCP range is set to 192.168.1.2 to 192.168.1.254
    Step 6: Go to LAN IP setup(Applies to a Netgear device) or otherwise called Static DHCP, where you can assign a static IP to an attached device
    Step 7: Next, because the Router(E3000) is connected to the modem, set a Static IP for the E3000's WAN port to something in the Modems DHCP address range e.g 192.168.1.2
    Step 8: Next turn wireless off
    Step 9: Setup DNS servers if you feel like it
    Step 10: Turn your firewall and NAT off
    Step 11: DMZ to your Router IP (192.168.1.2)
    Step 12: Make sure all your ISP details are entered for PPPoA and such, meaning the Username and Password your ISP gave to you.
    Step 12: Make sure you wipe out all the information in the Basic Settings section (In the Basic Settings section for a Netgear) that contains your Username and Password for your ISP TCP/IP configuration, as your Router will be handling the TCP/IP configuration
    Step 13: Turn DHCP off

    Thats the steps complete for configuring your Modem, after this point, you cannot connect a device directly to the modem unless you force an IP to be assigned, as DHCP is off.

    Disconnect all ethernet cables, and run one Ethernet cable from your PC straight to a LAN port of the Router(E3000)


    Router Configuration (E3000)

    The router is going to handle DHCP, Firewall and NAT and router functions, here are the steps:

    Step 1: Open the E3000 configuration page
    Step 2: Make sure DHCP is on
    Step 3: Change the routers subnet to 192.168.2.1, then re-access the configuration page at 192.168.2.1.
    Step 4: Set the DHCP range to 192.168.2.2 to 192.168.2.254
    Step 5: Set the Primary and Secondary DNS to the IP of your Modem (In this case, 192.168.1.1)
    Step 6: Configure your TCP/IP configuration for your Username and Password (PPPoE Username and Password)

    Thats pretty much it for the configuration of the Router, so run an Ethernet cable from your Routers WAN port to a LAN port on your modem (Netgear)

    Your PPPoE setup from your Router is now complete!!!!
    _____________________________________________________________________________________________

    There is a slightly alternative way to do this (Only works if your ISP supports PPPoE)

    Put your Modem (Netgear) into Full Bridge Mode or Modem only mode

    For Netgear:

    http://DefaultGateway/setup.cgi?next_file=mode.htm

    Where for DefaultGateway you put the Default Gateway for your Netgear router in there, which is the same IP address you use to access its configuration page

    Step 1: Choose from the drop down menu the option "Modem Only"
    Step 2: Let it do its thing, and then restart the modem. (Do not try and access its configuration page as I believe it deactivates Modem only mode)
    Step 3: Once the Netgear has restart, connect a LAN cable from one of the Netgears LAN ports straight to the WAN port of your router
    Step 4: Setup your TCP/IP information (PPPoE) on your Router
    Step 5: Setup your DNS servers
    Step 6: Setup the Router almost as if it has its own built-in Modem

    That's pretty much it for that alternative. I would definitely say that this process is much easier to follow and perform, but the other process gives you more control over how you want it setup





  • WOW. THANK YOU. I love this website. I read a few forum threads from this website and many from others, but your instructions were so plain, I got it running fast! I have a Netgear gigabit router connected to my Cable modem, and now, my old Linksys 10/100 router as the slave (cacaded my router). I have now 2 PC's, a ReadyNAS Duo, and a CAT5e connection to my livingroom wired to my Netgear router, and a Xoom and Tivo (in bedroom) wirlessly connected. In livingroom wall jack I connected my old Linksys router (configured according to your directions) and now I have my other Tivo and PS3 wire connected!!! I tried it out, watching a Netflix movie via my Tivo while simulataneously watching a recorded show on my ReadyNAs via my PS3. No hiccups. Thanks!
    June 29, 2011 12:53:31 PM

    :)  and you never would have guessed a 17 year old did a better job than anyone else the forum;)

    I'm am so glad I've helped you out man, it makes my thread worth something to someone:) 

    Thanks, Axxeon
    Anonymous
    July 8, 2011 4:15:32 PM

    I have an AOL broadband set up at home, which they have provided a wireless router which only has one Ethernet port on it which is being used by the home computer. I live in a 3 story house and I'm on the 3rd floor and have a xbox running xbox live with a wireless dongle on it which I connect wirelessly to the router downstairs, I keep getting disconnected half way through online games which is getting really annoying. Is there any way of sorting this problem out, I was thinking of maybe getting a 2nd router set up in my bedroom on the 3rd floor where I have a phoneline but is all the same phoneline - is that possible 2 do? Or can I get some sort of extender I can put in the phone socket in the wall in my bedroom so I can either run a Ethernet cable from my xbox 2 it or boost the signal so that I don't get this problem.

    Thanks Paul.
    July 14, 2011 1:41:56 PM

    axxeon said:
    Well, replace the E3000 under warranty. You'll get a brand new updated model for free. The disconnections are a worry, so definitely get it replaced.

    As for Wireless-WOL, it's best to use a program for that, as you'll be able to wake a pc, wired or not.


    Thanks,
    Matt Scaffidi


    So I am finally moved in, have internet connected and have set up the network. I currently have my E4200 recieving the WAN signal in the basement. It has a LAN connection to my desktop and it is also transmitting a WLAN signal to the E3000 and the WRT54GS routers. They are both set up as wireless repeater bridges using dd-wrt firmware. The E3000 is connected to my HTPC and the TV, network receiver, and PS3 in the basement. The WRT54GS is wired to the TV and BluRay players upstairs.

    I am now trying to figure out the best way to utilize a central storage device:
    The E4200 (or E3000) could have an external HDD via USB 2.0.
    I could also use an old desktop with a couple of HDDs configured in RAID or just simply for storage of network data that would run all the time. But then would I need to buy server software?
    The next option would be a NAS and HDDs (this would be the most expensive as I don't have any of that equiptment around). I assume most retail NAS units come with decent software?
    Also, the desktop could have an external USB 3.0 HDD but then it would have to WOL for other network devices to access data.

    Any advice on the best, easiest, and cheapest options?
    July 28, 2011 2:28:28 AM

    myko14 said:
    So I am finally moved in, have internet connected and have set up the network. I currently have my E4200 recieving the WAN signal in the basement. It has a LAN connection to my desktop and it is also transmitting a WLAN signal to the E3000 and the WRT54GS routers. They are both set up as wireless repeater bridges using dd-wrt firmware. The E3000 is connected to my HTPC and the TV, network receiver, and PS3 in the basement. The WRT54GS is wired to the TV and BluRay players upstairs.

    I am now trying to figure out the best way to utilize a central storage device:
    The E4200 (or E3000) could have an external HDD via USB 2.0.
    I could also use an old desktop with a couple of HDDs configured in RAID or just simply for storage of network data that would run all the time. But then would I need to buy server software?
    The next option would be a NAS and HDDs (this would be the most expensive as I don't have any of that equiptment around). I assume most retail NAS units come with decent software?
    Also, the desktop could have an external USB 3.0 HDD but then it would have to WOL for other network devices to access data.

    Any advice on the best, easiest, and cheapest options?



    Mass apologies, something was wrong with my email, usually I get an email when someone replies to my thread, so something must have gone wrong.

    Anyways, to your question. This is the setup I have.

    I have smart wiring so it makes everything SO much easier.
    Net gear DG834Gv5 handles to the connection to my ISP and PPPoE configuration. The Netgear acts as a 'dumb modem' and bridges the connection to the E3000. The E3000 handles port forwarding, fire walling, security, DHCP and every other router function. I have a Cat5e cable running into a port in the wall that goes straight to my room upstairs (1Gbit) and another straight to my dads PC, everything else in the house is connected wirelessly.

    I have 3 external hard drives connected to my PC and shared across the network. These hard drives are pretty much on all the time, and are 2TB, 2TB and 1.5TB and connected VIA USB 3.0. With this setup, the hard drives can utilize their power saving function, which spins the hd down when not in use for a few minutes.

    Although, I leave my PC on 24/7 pretty much, so it's not all that good for my PC. Now with your suggested idea, mounting the hard drive VIA the E3000, You will be limited the maximum speed of USB 2.0 which is 480Mbps (60MB/s) compared to having it wired VIA USB 3.0 and your PC(USB 3.0 is 5Gbps) and bottlenecked by Ethernet( 1Gbps).

    So the benefit of connecting it VIA your PC is you'll get pretty much twice the bandwidth capabilities. Sharing will be easier, especially streaming to other devices with on the fly streaming.

    Now if your doing on-the-fly streaming with Tversity for example, you obviously need Tversity on your PC. Now if you had the hard drives connected directly to your PC, well everything would be easy as.

    But instead of mourning USB, or leaving your PC on, if you have the cash, purchase a NAS, preferably a Non-Raid NAS, so its just like an external hard drive enclosure.

    Yeh, I just rambled on about connecting VIA USB or your PC, and then realized about a NAS. A NAS would be a perfect option, if you can afford it.

    Anyways, I hope that helps, just jump on http://pccasegear.com to grab your NAS. And yeh, let me know how it goes.
    August 10, 2011 11:11:11 PM

    Will the Triple Router Y-Configuration work if you start with a modem and wired router that are separate units. Such as a Motorola cable surf modem to a 4-port broadband ethernet router, then out to the two wireless routers?
    August 11, 2011 3:05:41 AM

    YEs, it should work perfectly if you bridge the modem to the router and then follow my instructions for the triple y cnfig
    August 11, 2011 3:26:15 AM

    Thanks, but does bridging the modem to the router require anything more than connecting the modem CAT5 port to the router WAN port?
    August 11, 2011 3:59:45 AM

    Most of the time it should be easy as, but follow my guide anyways
    August 12, 2011 10:09:51 PM

    Hi Axxeon,

    Just wondering if you know how to enable sharing resources between 2 router (each connected to internet) ?
    Router 1 with 192.168.0.x
    Router 2 with 192.168.1.x

    I want to share printers, network faxs between 2 network but I don't want mess the internet traffic. so users on 1.x only use WAN 1 and cannot use WAN 2.

    Thanks
    August 13, 2011 10:30:07 PM

    I got my first one up and running this weekend. I went with a Y-configuration. The biggest issue I had was setting the right Static IP information on the master and the slaves. I'm a noob.

    (Also, remembering to reconnect cables carrectly as I worked on things, sheesh!)

    (And, not using the darn Cisco-Linksys software for the modems. Much easier to do from web interface, without ever touching the software. Obviously, you can do a lot of the configuration in using their software.)

    I'll try to map it all out in a decent graphic and post it.
    August 15, 2011 1:01:48 AM

    anugroho said:
    Hi Axxeon,

    Just wondering if you know how to enable sharing resources between 2 router (each connected to internet) ?
    Router 1 with 192.168.0.x
    Router 2 with 192.168.1.x

    I want to share printers, network faxs between 2 network but I don't want mess the internet traffic. so users on 1.x only use WAN 1 and cannot use WAN 2.

    Thanks


    Ok, you want to have the netoworks completely separate yes? So to have a printer and stuff, your gonan need to run a Y-configuration with 3 routers, A Master to 2 slaves, and have your printer setup on the master, or have a computer connected to the master with the printer shared. That way you can sahre the printer accross the network but your retain the security between the two subnets.

    Thanks,
    Axxeon
    August 22, 2011 9:06:16 PM

    Hi! First of, YOU'RE 17???? Holy crap you're good..
    Second, my problem. I currently have a modem connected to a Netgear 3500 (router 1) running it's own SSID in the basement. A wire running from router 1 to a second one one the main floor configured with a different SSID (Netgear WGR614v8, router 2). The 2 SSIDs are working fine, i can connect to both and get internet on all my devices (wireless), the problem comes when I need to extend the range of the second router. I don't know how to set it up! I've tried many guides and it's getting very frustrating! I would really appreciate if you could help me! I want to extend the second router's range by connecting a Linksys wrt54gs v2 to it.
    Here is what I have:

    Router 1 (working):
    Internet IP Address: Get Dynamically From ISP
    Domain Name Server (DNS) Address: Get Automatically From ISP

    LAN TCP/IP Setup
    IP Address : 192.168.1.99
    IP Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
    RIP Direction: Both

    Router 2 (working):
    Internet IP Address: Get Dynamically From ISP
    Domain Name Server (DNS) Address: Get Automatically From ISP


    LAN TCP/IP Setup
    IP Address : 192.168.2.1
    IP Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0

    Use Router as DHCP Server (yes)
    Starting IP Address: 192.168.2.3
    Ending IP Address: 192.168.2.254

    Router 3 (NOT WORKING):

    LAN TCP/IP Setup
    IP Address : 192.168.2.2
    IP Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
    August 23, 2011 3:59:23 AM

    Hey there,

    Yes I'm 17 and Thanks!!!

    OK so what I think you should do is, chuck DD-WRT on the WRT-54GS, you'll find it on here

    http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Supported_Devices#...

    check the back of your router for the version number and you'll find it on that link.

    Once that's done, there should be a section on your second routers configuration page, something like Router Repeating or WDS, now you would set that to your 3rd router's MAC address(on the back of the router) and then I'm pretty sure that's pretty much it.

    Your 3rd router should now be receiving a repeated wireless signal. If it is not, you may also need to configure the 3rd router to receive a repeated signal from the 2nd router, so just chuck in the second routers MAC address and that should be it.

    Hopefully it should work, let me know how it goes.

    Thanks,
    Axxeon
    August 23, 2011 4:04:28 AM

    Ok so, once you've done what I outlined in the previous post, turn DHCP off on the 3rd router and you should be set to go I think, If that doesn't work, let me know ok.

    Thanks,
    Axxeon
    August 23, 2011 11:17:51 PM

    Hey man! thank you for your reply!
    I have tried that before and i'm afraid that won't work as the netgear router that i have (WGR614 v8) does not support WDS (the second router..) even with dd-wrt. So what I decided to do is just run a cable all the way to the other side of the house and connect router 2 with the linksys (router 3). I already purchased the 75ft cable.

    Again, Router 2 is setup like this:

    LAN TCP/IP Setup
    IP Address : 192.168.2.1
    IP Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0

    Use Router as DHCP Server (yes)
    Starting IP Address: 192.168.2.3
    Ending IP Address: 192.168.2.254

    And the linksys (router 3) is set up like this:

    Local IP Address : 192.168.2.2 -----------> One increment higher that the second router!
    IP Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
    and has DHCP disabled.

    Once I hit apply on the settings of the linksys, I cannot longer access it. I have to reset it for it to load on 192.168.1.1 again.
    I don't understand why this happens..

    I have connected the cable from LAN-LAN, no results!

    should I change the DNS of the third router to the IP of the second one?

    Thanks again man!!
    August 24, 2011 12:41:17 AM

    Read my cascading router (same subnet) section.That applies to what you're trying to achieve.
    August 27, 2011 7:14:32 PM

    Thanks! it works!! I just had to do that DNS thing.
    I did however had to put a different SSID for the third router because I thought it wouldn't work if the names were the same but with different IPs..
    Again, thank you so much for pointing me in the right direction!!
    August 28, 2011 3:34:04 AM

    No problems buddy:) 
    August 31, 2011 4:19:26 AM

    Hey you seem to know what you are talking about so I'll ask my question here.
    I recently moved into a new house that has ethernet cables that come out of the wall in several rooms. My cable modem is downstairs and I need the upstairs ethernet ports to work for my desktop. I have tried connecting my cable modem to the etherner cable downstairs and my computer to another ethernet cable upstairs but that did nothing. I have also tried going from my modem>router>ethernet>computer and that still did nothing. I have tried connecting computers to multiple cables and setting up a network but the computers say a network cable is unplugged.
    Do you have any ideas of how I can get the ethernet cables to work throughout the house so I just plug them into computers and have internet?
    September 3, 2011 10:03:00 AM

    Hi Axxeon,

    I am hoping you can help me out with the following problem.
    I have two draytek's 2820 at different locations which are connected threw a VPN connection. This connection is up and running! Now I want to install another router behind one of the draytek routers. Offcourse you can try solving this by installing it in an configuration you mentioned above (CASCADING A ROUTER (Same subnet)).

    The second router has some options like VOIP which needs the router to have a WAN IP adres which can be achieved by connecting it as a router as aposed to a switch.

    I configured the routers as followed:

    Draytek 2820
    WAN ip: from ISP
    LAN ip: 192.168.2.1
    DHCP on, 192.168.2.4~200
    UTP cable from lan port to wan port of Thompson router

    Thompson router (with Wifi & fxo port for voip)
    WAN IP: 192.168.2.2
    LAN IP: 192.168.2.3
    DHCP on, 192.168.2.201~255
    DNS: 192.168.2.1

    What configuration should I use so that the Thompson router (the second one) would get a WAN IP from the DHCP from the Draytek?

    Thanks :-)
    October 6, 2011 7:17:15 PM

    Quote:
    Change the DHCP range of the router(Master) from 192.168.1.2-254, to 192.169.1.3-254, so the address range is one increment above the Slave routers IP address.


    My router wont let me change the range of this on the Master Router.
    October 7, 2011 7:39:02 PM

    Axxeon,

    Thanks for this post--it has been immensely useful to me.

    I'm having a problem that I hope you might have an idea how to solve.

    I previously set up a second router (Linksys WRT54GL v1.1) as a slave precisely the way you suggested. All was working well for months, then my primary router (Verizon FIOS) died. I just replaced the FIOS router and my network is all working fine except I am unable to access the set up menu on my Linksys router to reconfigure it. I have tried everything I can think of. I have done a hard reset of the device, plugged it into multiple computers (LAN port to LAN port), but I can't access the configuration screen. I read the suggestion that I plug it in and then run ipconfig in a cmd line to make sure I am using the correct default gateway, but when I did this, I didn't get a default gateway shown. I am wondering now if somehow the Linksys router is dead as well. I know the wired connection from the FIOS router to the Linksys router is working because I can connect the computer directly to the FIOS router and get a network connection.

    Any ideas would be appreciated!

    Thanks.
    October 20, 2011 9:50:18 AM

    Sorry guys, I'm not getting email notifications for the thread, stupid thing...

    Anyways, who still needs help???
    October 20, 2011 12:51:58 PM

    axxeon said:
    Sorry guys, I'm not getting email notifications for the thread, stupid thing...

    Anyways, who still needs help???



    I'm good. Determined that my slave router was damaged--must have had some sort of spike or something that damaged both. Bought a new router and all is working perfectly.

    Thamks again for this thread.
    November 4, 2011 4:31:56 PM

    axxeon i need help with a temporary lan connection i need to setup for multiplayer gaming.... i need to connect a minimum of 10 pcs via lan but all i have is a 8-port switch and a dsl-2460t it has router capabilites i think so can i interconnect the two via ethernet and bridge them ??? or what should i do

    thanks in advance
    -DESPERATE need to have it up by saturday BTW im a noob st networking pls use common language.... idk all the abbrivetions
    November 18, 2011 3:07:02 PM

    Running a Triple Router Y-Configuration pretty much covers the setup I am using, except we have 5 subnets fed from one gateway router/modem. I know just enough to cause a real mess, so I would appreciate your help.

    I am right to assume that if we want to share a printer between two of the 5 subnets, I would insert another router that Y-configures them downstream from the gateway? IE, what you describe


    Gateway 192.168.0.1
    |
    | Printers on 0.(x) shared with all
    |
    ____________________________________________________
    Routers | | | | |
    IP 0.10 0.20 00.30 0.40 0.100
    | | | | |
    Subnet 10.1 20.1 30.1 40.1 100.1


    To share printers between 40 and 100, would it look like:

    Gateway 192.168.0.1
    |
    ____________________________________________________
    Routers | | | |
    IP 0.10 0.20 0.30 0.2
    | | | |
    subnet 10.1 20.1 30.1 140.1
    | Printers on 140.(x)
    | shared with 40.x
    | and 100.x
    _________________
    | |
    Lan 140.40 140.100
    | |
    subnet 40.1 100.1


    Q: How do I put on computer on the shared subnets so that it can use fileserver and printers on both subnets?

    Q: We have been talking about ethernet connected devices: How would I share a USB printer between subnets?

    Would this be easier with programmable switches rather than SOHO gateway routers?

    Thanks for your help

    Manfred
    !