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Building New Rig, First Time, Scared!

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February 21, 2012 6:13:32 PM

Hello,
I'm going to be ordering all the parts I need to build a new rig for myself. All the parts I'm getting are from Newegg for various reasons, best of which it's convenient.

I was hoping you could take a quick glance and tell me if everything seems alright. Maybe one part is under par, another one over. Perhaps you know a better part.

The main thing is, I'd like to keep this price. If it's necessary, I'll pay a bit more. If it's just a bit better, I'm ok with it.

I tried making a public wish list on Newegg, but it doesn't seem to be appearing. Here is the list itself.

Corsair Obsidian Series 650D
Corsair GS700 ATX12V v2.3 PLUS

Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge 3.3 1155 LGA 95W
(Please note that I may overclock in the future, but probably not right away)
ASUS P8Z68-V LE LGA 1155 Intel Z68 SATAIII
Cooler Master Hyper N 520 92mm Sleeve
Arctic 5 Thermal Compound

Mushkin Enhanced Blackline 8GB DDR3 1600
Mushkin Enhanced Chronos 2.5" 120GB SATAIII SSD
Western Digital Caviar Green 750GB IntelliPower SATA 6.0Gb/s
Toshiba Canvio 3.0 750 External Hard Drive

LG22 DVD Drive

Microsoft 7 Home Office
ESET Smart Security V.5

Dell ST2321L 23" 5ms LED Monitor

There are other items, like a keyboard and mouse, etc., but those aren't really as important as what I'm asking here. I also have items like that picked out that I'm sure of.

More about : building rig time scared

a b B Homebuilt system
February 21, 2012 7:29:42 PM

Hi! Welcome to the forums.

Looks good! You've done very well. I do however have a few things to note.
-Change the Hyper N cooler to the Hyper 212+ http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... Cools better. You can drop the thermal paste too, as the 212+ comes with MX-2.
-If you are going to get a Mushkin Chronos SSD, make it the more expensive Chronos Deluxe. It uses Toshiba Toggle NAND, which is much faster and more stable. Otherwise get a Vertex 3 or Crucial M4.
-I don't see a GPU!

Very good job. You did your research.
February 21, 2012 11:57:50 PM

striker410 said:
Hi! Welcome to the forums.

Looks good! You've done very well. I do however have a few things to note.
-Change the Hyper N cooler to the Hyper 212+ http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... Cools better. You can drop the thermal paste too, as the 212+ comes with MX-2.
-If you are going to get a Mushkin Chronos SSD, make it the more expensive Chronos Deluxe. It uses Toshiba Toggle NAND, which is much faster and more stable. Otherwise get a Vertex 3 or Crucial M4.
-I don't see a GPU!

Very good job. You did your research.


Thank you! Yeah, I've done a ton of research. Almost every day, too. I've replaced some GPUs, memory sticks, and PSUs in prebuilt computers my family has owned, so I'm comfortable going in (Biggest step, perhaps). It's just taking the plunge into building the whole machine.

-I've changed the Hyper N to the Hyper 212+. Lots of people are saying the same thing online. I'll drop the thermal paste too. Also, what about the Noctua NH-D14? Thing looks like it could cool a jet. Also, there's the X6 Elite from Cooler Master. Any news on that? I looks pretty legit, but I'm still unsure about heatsinks (probably the most unsure out of any parts).
-I'll look into those SSDs. Thanks!
-Can't believe I forgot, but the GPU is an EVGA nVIDIA GTX 570. I only plan on ever using one GPU, so I think the PSU is very appropriate for a few years at least.
Related resources
a b B Homebuilt system
February 22, 2012 12:12:53 AM

Haha, you pretty much nailed the DH-14. It's for extreme overclockers, those who want to push the voltage and get their chips to 5.0GHz and whatnot. I think you'll be just fine with the Hyper 212 ;) 

You mean the V6? Yeah, the Hyper 212 actually cools better. It's a bit odd, I think it's due to the plastic shell surrounding the V6. Looks badass but doesn't work as well.

-If I might suggest, I'd move from the GTX 570. It feels like it's in a bit of a wonky spot. Either step up to the 6970 or bump down to the GTX 560 TI 448 Core. Here's why: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/geforce-gtx-560-ti-... With performance nearly matching that of the GTX 570 for ~$40 cheaper, it's a no brainer. Plus the fact that overclocking potential is increased a bunch makes it a compelling buy.

This one http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... Is factory overclocked by a significant amount, meaning it will beat the GTX 570 out of the gates. If this one ever comes back into stock: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... It's another excellent option.

-This mobo is cheaper and offers more options: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... the one you have is plenty fine though.

The PSU is excellent. If you only want to run a single card, you might consider dropping to a 650w: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... The Rosewill HIVE is very highly rated and is fully modular. Your choice!
February 22, 2012 1:03:28 AM

Do you recommend the Hyper 212 Plus, or 212 EVO? I came across this (( http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... )) when searching for the 212. Does one make the difference, or should I go for the cheaper one which thousands have seemingly rated 5/5?

Actually, I know about the V6. I'm talking about the X6 Elite that isn't available, apparently. It has a honeycomb design and is angled, as to blow air right out of the top, back exhaust. Looks interesting, but it isn't available.
http://www.coolermaster-usa.com/product.php?product_id=...

I was up in the air about the GTX 560 Ti, Ti 448, GTX 570, and Radeon 6950 myself. I'll check into the Ti 448 and probably go with that.
The Micro Center near me carries some of these. Any opinion? I never came across the Ti 448 you recommended before, and it looks like it'll do just fine, though. Even better.
http://www.microcenter.com/single_product_results.phtml...

I think I may stick with the mobo I have simply because it has UEFI. From what I've seen, it looks like it's a great interface, but still allows me to access the normal BIOS screen. To me, that's worth it. Would just like the option.

I think I'll go with the Corsair 650 Professional Series. Given the rebates, it's the same as the PSU I had, but completely modular. I've heard plenty about Corsair and not so much about Rosewill, so I realize it's probably stupid to just go by name, but that's just what I'm comfortable with at this very moment. Also, ... uh, it matches.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

So given all that, is 650W still enough? I thought with aging, even the 700W was cutting it close.

By the way, this is all helping (both in parts, and confidence). Really appreciative!
a b B Homebuilt system
February 22, 2012 1:20:58 AM

I'll start from the top.
The Hyper 212 EVO is indeed better. However it's nearly $40 with shipping, and since it's only a 1-2C difference between the + and the EVO, I figured I'd recommend the EVO.


Huh, looks quite interesting. The X6, eh? That'll be one to watch.

Microcenter is great, just keep in mind you'll need to pay tax, which is going to be pricey. The one you linked isn't actually a 560 Ti 448, it's a normal Ti with 2GB Vram.
Really any will be fine. I just like that one because it's got high ratings, good warranty and vents all the air outside the case, keeping the innards cool.

The Extreme3 has a UEFI, also. Speaking from experience =p The Asus is fine though. Really, it is.

That PSU is hella expensive. While the 650HX is indeed a good PSU, as is Corsair as brand, I cannot recommend such an expensive PSU. The HIVE is a good PSU, HardwareSecrets (reputable source, to be sure) gave it the Gold Award: http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/Rosewill-HIVE-65...
If you wanna stick with Corsair, I completely understand. Better to not take a risk, I'm just trying to show you the best deals. I'd prefer the Corsair TX650M For $20 less: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... Or the NZXT Hale for $95 after promo code: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... Just showing you a few options.

650w is plenty. Take a look at this Guru3D (another highly respected source) review: http://www.guru3d.com/article/geforce-gtx-570-review/8 They pulled 369 watts at full load. That's the ENTIRE SYSTEM, including an overclocked I7-965 which is FAR more power hungry than the i5-2500k. By far.

No problem! I know it's odd getting all your advice from one person, hopefully someone else will jump in and add some thoughts ;) 
February 22, 2012 1:36:59 AM

Yeah, I went with the EVO instinctively. There's a thread here on it too, apparently. I think I'll go with the 212+ for now, and if I decide to go further with my processor, I'll consider a more significant upgrade. Perhaps I'll keep an eye on that X6. The design just seems to make plenty of sense, but only time and reviews will tell.
http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/324176-10-hyper

I hear you, about Micro Center. Also, know that I live in Massachusetts, and the taxes are probably a bit higher than other states. I'm reluctant to go there unless it's for something simple, or convenience beats all. I'll stick with the Ti 448 you recommended.

Also, that Corsair TX650M is apparently semi-modular, not completely modular. It doesn't say it, but people have mentioned it a few times. I'm somewhat torn, but for a $10 difference, I could simply go completely modular. The Corsair 650D computer case should have plenty of cable management, but yeah, I'll weigh my choices for another day or two before I place the order. There's no really much to compare between such similar PSUs, but I'll add the Rosewill to my wish list just to make sure I'm aware of the option before I buy.

That Guru3D page put any doubts of mine to rest. I remember when I was a kid, I blew (or melted) a GPU because the wattage was too low. It was gradual, but the graphics became very ... different after a while. Think I'm just paranoid from that.
February 22, 2012 1:37:17 AM

^+1

Striker, you've said basically everything I would have plus some. I can't think of anything else. He looks set to build to me.
a b B Homebuilt system
February 22, 2012 1:44:33 AM

pillbinge said:

Also, that Corsair TX650M is apparently semi-modular, not completely modular. It doesn't say it, but people have mentioned it a few times. I'm somewhat torn, but for a $10 difference, I could simply go completely modular. The Corsair 650D computer case should have plenty of cable management, but yeah, I'll weigh my choices for another day or two before I place the order. There's no really much to compare between such similar PSUs, but I'll add the Rosewill to my wish list just to make sure I'm aware of the option before I buy.
The only difference between semi-modular and modular is that cables that are REQUIRED (Motheboard 24 pin connector, CPU 8 pin connector, GPU 6 pin connector) cannot detach. This isn't a big deal, since you will be using all of them anyway.
pillbinge said:

That Guru3D page put any doubts of mine to rest. I remember when I was a kid, I blew (or melted) a GPU because the wattage was too low. It was gradual, but the graphics became very ... different after a while. Think I'm just paranoid from that.
Haha, I've never done that, although I've always wanted to see a PSU go bang :lol:  650w will be fine, hell you could run an overclocked GTX 580 on it and be fine!

Let me know if you have any more questions. Looks like Admiral will back up the fact that I'm not spewing crap :p 
February 22, 2012 2:52:31 AM

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I've been building pcs for 10+ years and I have exclusively built with these LEGENDARY psus without a single failure...if you read through the cons at newegg...there's only one that indicates a failure...ONLY ONE...and it WAS 4-5 years old before any issue arose...PCPower&Cooling is absolutely reliable and I have performed extensive research on the PSU as it's developed over the past decade and I have found NONE that surpass these psus for reliability and RIPPLE FREE power...the dip experienced when first placing a load on the psu or during extended heavy loads being placed on the psu can create a ripple in the delivered power...the power output from these psus is beyond rock solid and steady...there's virtually NO FLUCTUATION on any portion of the power output...be it 1.5v, 3.3v, 5v, or 12v.

PCPower&Cooling has only subscribed to the SINGLE RAIL design...the psu also exhausts its heat OUT THE BACK of the case thereby not adding to the heat buildup inside the case and it's not MODULAR.

The modular design is a bad idea from an engineers point of view...since modular cabling introduces another "point of failure" into the power scheme! The first designs of modular cables for psus didn't go so well and although in the past 4-5 years the design of the connectors are vastly superior...the point of failure is still there where as solderd connections for all cables is much more reliable in every way.

I'm always willing to give up a bit aesthetically speaking (pretty cabling) for performance AND reliability as well as limiting points of failure as much as possible. It definitely makes troubleshooting a machine that is being stubborn much easier if I don't have to worry about power, the connections for power and heat issues inside my case that arise from inadequate ventilation or unnecessary heat being introduced.

The psu I included also has a manufacturers rebate that drops the price down to below a $100...that's a steal no matter how you look at it and provides for WORRY FREE POWER period. It also almost guarantees no issues with power causing bsod's and machine crashes because of instabilities in the power being supplies or the cabling connectors having increased resistance.

This is from someone who has worked around electricity and electronics for most of 40 years.
I prefer not to have to even worry about the power being supplied, the quality of the build, and/or the connections being faulty, not that I don't ever check, I monitor all voltages on my machine continously when up and running...right on my desktop...but I have never had an issue of ANY KIND with PCPower&Cooling psus period.

My design envelope for any build of a pc includes this note...always spend as much as you can on the power supply...whatever you can afford...the psu is the absolute heart of the machine...without a stable supply of power...the headaches are immense...with a stable supply....ALL COMPONENTS BENEFIT and longevity as well as performance is IMPROVED. That's a fact that cannot be denied!
February 22, 2012 12:41:04 PM

Ah, ok. The last PSU I bought was 4, maybe 5 years ago. I believe that one was semi-modular too, given the description.

And yeah, I think I melted a graphics card because I was 14 and just installed one for the first time without really understanding the situation. It wasn't instant, it was gradual. One day, I just noticed that the graphics seemed ... smoother, watered, more saturated. It was directly affecting the graphics I was seeing. At one point, the system just refused to do anything graphically intensive. I'd imagine that if the thing actually blew up, I'd have had to pay for a new wall too. =]
February 22, 2012 1:52:06 PM

I think striker410 pretty much nailed it. You've done your homework, so you already did a great job in spec'ing out a system. But, as you can see by the links striker410 provided, he gave you rock solid advice on a few changes that you should implement. The only thing I would add would be possibly thinking about dropping from a 560 Ti to a 550 Ti, and maybe bumping up the RAM beyond 8GB. I was in the same boat when I was building my SB rig, and I ended up going with the 550. I don't do a lot of heavy gaming on it, so I saved a bit of cash that way. The 550 handles any CG rendering I do, as well as playing blu rays at 1080P on a 42" screen with no issue. Not sure if this pertains to your situation, but I wanted to offer some advice.

In any case, there's no reason to be scared :p  Just relax, you've obviously done your research and you have a great system spec'd out. You'll be fine. And if you have any issues come up, you obviously know the right place to come to if you need some help :) 
February 22, 2012 5:33:27 PM

Haha, thanks. Yeah, I've had since about December to really pick out the right pieces and get it together. I've always checked back every day, comparing everything I could find or doing a little research here and there.

I don't think I'll drop the quality of the GPU. I am, myself, a heavy gamer. I'm not an obsessive enthusiast who needs 60 frames-per-second, but I like to be able to play top-quality games. Looking forward to The Old Republic and Mass Effect 3 when I get the machine up and running.

I also wanted a machine that had a good CPU, but could, I dunno, future-proof itself by being easily overclockable. Part of me is still torn between the i5 and i7 "K" series, but from what I've also read, the i5 is comparable, easily overclocked, and could get past a gaming threshold for quality just as easy.
a b B Homebuilt system
February 22, 2012 5:39:45 PM

The only difference between the i7-2600k and the i5-2500k is the inclusion of HyperThreading. HyperThreading is the act of tricking the OS into thinking each core is actually two, meaning the cores can handle more processes at a time.

This however is not very efficient when it comes to gaming. Why? HyperThreading works best in server enviroments, where more cores is better than higher performance. In games, the CPU is stressed to the max, meaning high performance is better than multiple cores.

In many games, HyperThreading has a negative impact on performance. That is why the 2500k reigns king over the gaming world.

I will also note that going from GTX 560 Ti 448 to GTX 550 Ti is a rather severe drop: http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/315?vs=499 Maybe dropping to a GTX 560 (no Ti) or 6870 would be a better middle ground.
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