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Any reason to get i7 3770 with the "K"

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June 8, 2012 6:27:54 PM

we are building a couple of CAD work stations and using the i7 3770. Since we don't intend to over clock anything is there really any reason to get the "K" version instead of the non-"K" ?

I realize the locked version is a 3.4 and the unlocked is 3.5 but since they are both spec'd at 3.9 with turbo it seems irrelevant to me.

Is there any other difference to consider?

More about : reason 3770

a c 80 à CPUs
June 8, 2012 6:57:04 PM

I think that the non-k has some additional business oriented features:
http://ark.intel.com/compare/65719,65523
the extra 0.1 on the K is not that important in general usage.

And consider some of the business oriented mobo's
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June 8, 2012 7:08:43 PM

May be a little OC will be required in near future when your CPU wears out its shine.But going with the 'K' version will push up your budget,which in this case you have not told us.No one starts gaming at an age of 6 when you get your first rig,but later everything goes on on the same rig which was taken for general use.

I'm not pressurizing on the gaming need of i7 3770K,for that i5 3570K is a beast.What I'm trying to tell is just making the rig a little futureproof.
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a c 190 à CPUs
June 8, 2012 7:13:07 PM

The Intel® Core™ i7-3770K is the unlocked processor while the Intel Core i7-3770 comes with some more business feature support for things like VT-d and TXT. It comes down to a simple question, "Do you see yourself overclocking this processor?" If yes then go with the "K" and if not then don't.
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a b à CPUs
June 8, 2012 7:26:22 PM

even with the lock you can still OC the system a bit (up to a 42 multiplier I believe, but I am not 100% sure on IB chips), so I would not really worry about getting the non-K over a 100Mhz difference. Otherwise no difference, just a different binning of the chips quality (ie the K version can handle more voltage and heat while remaining stable).

As 13th monkey mentioned, the nonK version can be embedded, has vPro support, VT-d support, and Trusted Execution support. The K version lacks this, but can be overclocked beyond the 4.2GHz cap that is placed on the nonK version.

A note on OCing locked processors: You can overclock through the turbo boost tech, which is supposed to only work on single thread applicaitons. However, the OC is really based on core temps, so it will work for multiple cores/threads so long as you have a cooler that will keep things frosty. On my own system I have the multiplier set to 42, and watching my speed during Intel Burn test I consistently get up to 3.8-4GHz. The highest I have see it get to is 4.3GHz briefly when I had the BLCK set at 105, but I found on average that the turbo boost gets to the higher multipliers more consistantly when BLCK is set to 102. It is still a locked CPU, but 4GHz under load is not bad at all. Oh, and my CPU is a 2600, cooled by a Hyper 212Evo with 2 silent 120mm fans, used for video editing and games, and it does both without a hitch.
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a b à CPUs
June 8, 2012 8:04:03 PM

jbourne84 said:
we are building a couple of CAD work stations and using the i7 3770. Since we don't intend to over clock anything is there really any reason to get the "K" version instead of the non-"K" ?

I realize the locked version is a 3.4 and the unlocked is 3.5 but since they are both spec'd at 3.9 with turbo it seems irrelevant to me.

Is there any other difference to consider?


define cad programs? cad programs like pro/e or autocad or solidworks DO NOT need an i7. they do not need a i5, they are fine with a dual core.

i use Pro/e maybe 20 hours a week and i routinely see it only use one core. cad programs are not extensive programs.
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June 8, 2012 8:57:31 PM

cbrunnem said:
define cad programs? cad programs like pro/e or autocad or solidworks DO NOT need an i7. they do not need a i5, they are fine with a dual core.

i use Pro/e maybe 20 hours a week and i routinely see it only use one core. cad programs are not extensive programs.


I actually disagree, we use AutoCAD Architecture & AutoCAD Civil 3D which are designed to use multiple cores... and even if they are not quad core specific id say it would be a bad idea to base our system upgrade around what we have now, with software becoming more and more multi core friendly every year. Since we dont want to do this any more often than we have to.

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June 8, 2012 9:01:49 PM

jbourne84 said:
I actually disagree, we use AutoCAD Architecture & AutoCAD Civil 3D which are designed to use multiple cores... and even if they are not quad core specific id say it would be a bad idea to base our system upgrade around what we have now, with software becoming more and more multi core friendly every year. Since we dont want to do this any more often than we have to.


just stating some facts here. im dealing with assemblies that tally over 500 parts and im not being cpu limited. i-2 fast cores do the deed.
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