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First time build help

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February 22, 2012 12:24:15 AM

How easy is it to completely *** up on my first time build and waste a *** tonne of money

will i come into any situations in which i am clueless and stuck

More about : time build

February 22, 2012 12:38:10 AM

give us the specs of both system will be the best way for us to help you
February 22, 2012 12:43:22 AM

How much skill do you have?
What technical skills do you have? meaning do you work in electronics, have you ever hooked up anything electronic? do you have a mechanical mind?

Building a computer is not that hard especially with resources like tomshardware and other sources on the internet.

Related resources
February 22, 2012 1:13:29 AM

thesnappyfingers said:
How much skill do you have?
What technical skills do you have? meaning do you work in electronics, have you ever hooked up anything electronic? do you have a mechanical mind?

Building a computer is not that hard especially with resources like tomshardware and other sources on the internet.


zero experience at all
February 22, 2012 2:01:51 AM

I would suggest using youtube to look at videos for a complete system build if I had no prior experience...this enables you to take a look, pause the video, perform the action, scroll forward and back through the procedure on the video to ensure you are following the instructions properly, ALWAYS USE A STATIC WRIST STRAP clipped to a metal portion of the case to reduce chance of static electricity sabotaging a component and it's always recommended to use "best practices" as the electronics community recommends to prevent avoidable mistakes that "could be" expensive!

There are many videos on complete builds available and odds are you can find your components in a build and install video as well.

Also, read thoroughly any descriptions on the choice of hardware that fits your BUDGET...know what you want to spend, what you want to use the build for...ie gaming, surfing the web, office or productivity, video editing, or just playing around on and light gaming.
Once you know what you want to do with the pc...and have determined a budget...Spend your money as best you can...a few wise choices would be...

#1 purchase the best psu you can afford that you think will fit your needs...there's plenty of power calculators out there to add components to to see power draw for each component and total system power needs, utilize one...they are usually free to calculate power requirements.

#2 A single powerful video card *gpu* will cause you less headache and perform well and require less power than a dual or more gpu setup...ie crossfire or SLI setup. Some gpu's perform well in dual or more configs and some do not.

#3 Ram...ddr3 is really cheap and usually reliable however...I've found that in the case of unusually heavy usage of memory or in the pursuit of overclocking...ram can be limiting...I prefer Kingston HyperX for my rigs...However I have GSkill RipJaw 1600 ram in my current build..it came with a purchase I made off of ebay in a rig that I used the mobo, gpu, and ram out of for my build...saved me several hundred dollars.

The lesson I knew and have learned is that quality ram usually costs a bit more but I have NEVER had a bad stick of Kingston or Crucial ram....the other ram manufacturers can't make that claim. I have also repaired more than a few pc's with bad ram from other manufacturers. Doesn't mean that the two I prefer do not ever had bad ram...just that my experience indicates that maybe the quality control is a bit better than the others or I have just been really lucky.

Finally, ensure proper air flow in your case and if overclocking...use an aftermarket cpu cooler..there are several economic coolers that outperform oem coolers that come with the cpu...just look at reviews and make a choice based on what reviews you read about that shows what works and what isn't worth the money. Most air coolers will fit all current models of motherboards both Intel and AMD and socket configurations. Read on the specs to ensure maximum compatibility.

I would recommend something like the cooler master Hyper 212 for $30-$40 bucks...it's a great cpu cooler for air cooling and performance for the monies spent is outstanding!

So to reiterate...use youtube extensively, perform research on components that match you budget, spend the money where the reliability is met with quality components in critical areas...ie...psu, ram, cpu cooler and ensure case with high air flow is a consideration. After that match budget to what you want the pc for...and have fun...welcome to the home builders community!
February 22, 2012 2:28:54 AM

I actually build without an anti static wrist band. They are only needed if you are that kind of OCD person. Just don't build on a rug and ground yourself by touching the case before picking up components.

Most ram won't fail. I perfer G.Skill ram but other brands as long as name brand should be just as good. Chances are if you buy off brand ram it will be just fine but is the chance worth the extra $2-5. I don't think so.

Thats just personal opinion though. Building a computer isn't very hard and tekman gave you some good advice. I would watch the videos made my newegg on building a computer.
April 29, 2012 11:54:30 PM

andrewcarr said:
I actually build without an anti static wrist band. They are only needed if you are that kind of OCD person. Just don't build on a rug and ground yourself by touching the case before picking up components.

Most ram won't fail. I perfer G.Skill ram but other brands as long as name brand should be just as good. Chances are if you buy off brand ram it will be just fine but is the chance worth the extra $2-5. I don't think so.

Thats just personal opinion though. Building a computer isn't very hard and tekman gave you some good advice. I would watch the videos made my newegg on building a computer.



Yeah...me to andrew....I haven't ever used a wrist strap since I'm always leaning on the case as I build and I make sure I'm on a hardwood or concrete floor to avoid static..I always make sure to just put a hand on the case FIRST...that way no static snap, crackle, or pop..ever occurs, and especially in the winter when the air is so much drier!

But "best practices" recommends always using a static strap so I included that as one should when directing somebody new to building for the first time. They can decide after that for themselves and the risk is on them then.
!