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CPU hits 80C (and shuts down) after 4 cores used for 30 minutes

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June 10, 2012 3:24:14 AM

My CPU hits 80C and shuts down after being heavily used for 30 minutes. By heavy use, I mean all 4 cores encoding audio files in parallel.

I'm not sure what the typical temperature of the CPU under heavy load is supposed to be. The CPU is a 2500k and cooler with the stock heatsink.

Is 80C hot? Should I just raise the shutdown temp for the CPU in the bios?

Could I have not seated the CPU correctly, or I need better thermal paste? I'm not sure what is normal here.

The CPU works fine for playing games like Fallout 3, or any other light use like data processing, 7-zip, etc. It idles at about 42C.
June 10, 2012 3:34:20 AM

Woah, 80C is a little hot. I would set the shut down temp at 70C.

As for the trouble shooting, did you install the heat sink correctly?
I would suggest taking the heat sink off and installing it again; make sure you twist the springs at the corners with a full 360 degree turn (I know my first time I left it loose).

You most likely seated the CPU correctly, and the thermal paste should be pre applied onto the heat sink.

Also what is the room temperature, and how many fans are in the case?
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a c 353 à CPUs
June 10, 2012 3:43:07 AM

The Max operating temp for the i5-2500k is 72.6C
http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/Core_i5/Intel-Core%20i5-2...

It seems like you don't have the HS/F sitting against the CPU's heat spreader properly. Try to re-seat the cooler.

Turn the thumb tabs CCW and lift up to unlock them, then reset them by turning them CW. Then... Be sure the cooler's black feet are flush to the board and push the thumb tabs back down till they click. Do it in a corner to corner pattern.
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a c 283 à CPUs
June 10, 2012 3:43:31 AM

80C IS pretty warm, but it wouldn't even throttle until the cores got to ~98C and wouldn't shutdown until well over that (unless you've changed the shutdown temp in the BIOS). Trust me, lol, I've had my 2500K up to 95C before with the stock cooler and it didn't throttle OR shutdown. Not sure what the shutdown issue is caused by, but it isn't the temps, even if they ARE too warm for my liking.

I'd say get a Hyper 212 Evo and have fun with a little OC'ing as well. :) 
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June 10, 2012 4:40:16 AM

I just reseated the heatsink and it remains about the same. The clicks were solid and the CPU didn't budge. About 42C idle in a 33C case temp, which increases to 55C when one core is maxed, and 70C+ when two cores are maxed.

And the shutdown is caused by my own setting in the BIOS. Sorry if that is unclear.
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a c 283 à CPUs
June 10, 2012 4:43:08 AM

sleepwellmyfriend said:
I just reseated the heatsink and it remains about the same. The clicks were solid and the CPU didn't budge. About 42C idle in a 33C case temp, which increases to 55C when one core is maxed, and 70C+ when two cores are maxed.

And the shutdown is caused by my own setting in the BIOS. Sorry if that is unclear.


Cool, got ya. Yeah just bring the shutdown temp up, or leave it at default. It'll be fine. 42C idle with the stock cooler at 33C ambient seems just about right. I still say just get a 212+/Evo. You won't need to be worrying then.
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a c 132 à CPUs
June 10, 2012 4:49:49 AM

The plastic frame and pins from Intel's stock HSF deform over time and lose their clamping force. Everyone I know who has ever used one of Intel's push-pin HSFs has run into this problem (core temperatures shooting up and not coming back down for very long after changing the thermal paste and re-seating the stock HSF) around three years after their initial build.

Only fix in those cases is to upgrade to aftermarket cooling. The 212 + or EVO is an easy choice to make if it fits on your motherboard and in your case.
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a c 132 à CPUs
June 10, 2012 1:45:13 PM

xerb said:
Like others said the Cooler Master 212+ or EVO are one of the best budget coolers out there.

I would say the 212s' main quality is not being "budget coolers", it is bringing performance that used to cost $60-100 down to ~$30.

When a $30 air cooler outperforms many closed-loop liquid and fancy air-coolers costing 2-4X as much, it just seems wrong to call them 'budget'. I would be more inclined to call everything else that does not significantly outperform the 212s grossly over-priced.
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a c 104 à CPUs
June 10, 2012 2:47:34 PM

212's performance cooling @ budget prices, who needs H2O.
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June 10, 2012 3:00:53 PM

InvalidError said:
The plastic frame and pins from Intel's stock HSF deform over time and lose their clamping force. Everyone I know who has ever used one of Intel's push-pin HSFs has run into this problem (core temperatures shooting up and not coming back down for very long after changing the thermal paste and re-seating the stock HSF) around three years after their initial build.

Only fix in those cases is to upgrade to aftermarket cooling. The 212 + or EVO is an easy choice to make if it fits on your motherboard and in your case.

Is this STILL an issue with Intel's stock HSF? Or, have Intel upgraded it any by, for example, replacing the plastic frame with something stronger so that it doesn't deform over time and cause this over-heating issue?

So, this has never been an issue with the Coolermaster 212+ and Evo HSF? So, for around $30 it's worth it regardless then?
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a c 132 à CPUs
June 10, 2012 3:56:42 PM

The i3/5/7 HSF is practically the same design as the Core2 HSF except for the addition of a copper core in the heatsink.

Most coolers with backplates use springs or spring-steel clips which do not suffer from thermal deformation unless you either over-bend them or heat them up to their shape-setting temperature which is typically in excess of 400C. Neither of which is likely to happen unless there is something even worse to worry about as the root cause.
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a b à CPUs
June 10, 2012 4:51:59 PM

The intel stock HSF have always been terrible. I just don't understand why they won't change their locking design to something more reliable.
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a c 132 à CPUs
June 10, 2012 6:02:58 PM

Supermuncher85 said:
The intel stock HSF have always been terrible. I just don't understand why they won't change their locking design to something more reliable.

Not all intel retention systems were horrible. I personally loved the P4/S478 "claw" with lock-down levers, those things definitely felt like they were not going to come off on their own... it even takes a little effort to disengage the claws when you want to take the HSF off even after unlocking the levers.
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