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DNS lookup failed with a wireless repeater

Last response: in Wireless Networking
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June 3, 2011 1:28:54 PM

Hello,
so iv had this problem with two wireless repeaters now. when im connected to just the router, i am able to access the internet. however when i plug in and set up the wireless repeater ( the latest one is a amped wireless sr300) it works for a few min and then i get a "DNS lookup failed" when trying to access sites.
this repeater replaced a hawking hwren1. which would work for a few min and then lose the network.
i believe this is a problem with our internet connection into the house, but could it be a caused by the router? (wrt400n) our isp says its not their problem and that its our router, but this is the 4th one in under a year.
June 3, 2011 2:06:17 PM

Hello that's a common problem but well I will try to help via writing this full instruction, let's start

Type "traceroute <domain>" at your command prompt. Replace "<domain>" with the name of the host. In this example, the "mydomain.com" is used. The syntax below is used to trace the path to this host.
traceroute mydomain.com

Read the output. As the packet is sent to the host, the time and routers the package "bounces" off is displayed in the console. The data looks similar to the data below:
traceroute to library.airnews.net (206.66.12.202), 30 hops max, 40 byte packets
1 myRouter (211.215.22.99) 4.345 ms 5.234 ms 2.876 ms
2 415.Hs-1.EST.RTR1.TT.NET (157.130.0.17) 6.918 ms 8.721 ms 16.476 ms
3 mydomain.com (198.34.23.4) 11.345 ms 123.456 ms 109.333 ms

Read the first line. The first line is the first "hop" the packet makes. This is normally your internal LAN router. It can also be the DSL or cable modem you use in your home network.

Read the millisecond times indicated by a number and "ms" at the end. The millisecond indication is the time it takes to reach the router and the time taken to respond. This is used to evaluate unusually long bounce rates. If the time is unusually high, then there may be an issue with that particular router.

Read IP addresses. The IP addresses shown are the assigned IPs of the router. The last entry in the displayed text is the destination's IP address. If an IP is shown with no fully qualified name, the DNS lookup for that IP address failed.

Determine good or bad results. Although traceroute is a good way of determining issues with routers on the network, it isn't a definitive method. It's a good place to begin diagnostics of a bad router by the amount of time it takes to return results. Taking the example from step two, the following line indicates a normal response from the router.
1 myRouter (211.215.22.99) 4.345 ms 5.234 ms 2.876 ms
However, a busy router may return much higher rates of 20 ms responses and above. Additionally, if a router on a major provider goes down, using traceroute to reach a domain may fail and return a line like below.
1 majorRouter (211.215.22.99) * ms * ms * ms
Asterisks indicate the router is down or busy and the response timed out. If the router in question is on your local network, then it may be time to upgrade the router.

(Added by Grumpy9117): Since you don't bother reading your PM's, please remove the link to your webpage from your posts and your sig It's SPAM.

Thank you.
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June 3, 2011 6:17:29 PM

instanthelpdoteu said:
Hello that's a common problem but well I will try to help via writing this full instruction, let's start

Type "traceroute <domain>" at your command prompt. Replace "<domain>" with the name of the host. In this example, the "mydomain.com" is used. The syntax below is used to trace the path to this host.
traceroute mydomain.com

Read the output. As the packet is sent to the host, the time and routers the package "bounces" off is displayed in the console. The data looks similar to the data below:
traceroute to library.airnews.net (206.66.12.202), 30 hops max, 40 byte packets
1 myRouter (211.215.22.99) 4.345 ms 5.234 ms 2.876 ms
2 415.Hs-1.EST.RTR1.TT.NET (157.130.0.17) 6.918 ms 8.721 ms 16.476 ms
3 mydomain.com (198.34.23.4) 11.345 ms 123.456 ms 109.333 ms

Read the first line. The first line is the first "hop" the packet makes. This is normally your internal LAN router. It can also be the DSL or cable modem you use in your home network.

Read the millisecond times indicated by a number and "ms" at the end. The millisecond indication is the time it takes to reach the router and the time taken to respond. This is used to evaluate unusually long bounce rates. If the time is unusually high, then there may be an issue with that particular router.

Read IP addresses. The IP addresses shown are the assigned IPs of the router. The last entry in the displayed text is the destination's IP address. If an IP is shown with no fully qualified name, the DNS lookup for that IP address failed.

Determine good or bad results. Although traceroute is a good way of determining issues with routers on the network, it isn't a definitive method. It's a good place to begin diagnostics of a bad router by the amount of time it takes to return results. Taking the example from step two, the following line indicates a normal response from the router.
1 myRouter (211.215.22.99) 4.345 ms 5.234 ms 2.876 ms
However, a busy router may return much higher rates of 20 ms responses and above. Additionally, if a router on a major provider goes down, using traceroute to reach a domain may fail and return a line like below.
1 majorRouter (211.215.22.99) * ms * ms * ms
Asterisks indicate the router is down or busy and the response timed out. If the router in question is on your local network, then it may be time to upgrade the router.

(Added by Grumpy9117): Since you don't bother reading your PM's, please remove the link to your webpage from your posts and your sig It's SPAM.

Thank you.


sorry but im a pretty huge noob when it comes to networking, what do you mean by "domain" domain of what? my isp?
also should i do this with the wireless repeater on or off?
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