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Computer freezes, CPU fails, solution?

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June 13, 2012 4:24:50 PM

Computer freezes, CPU fails, solution?

I recently have this problem. My computer HP dc7700 SFF freezes randomly.
I keep this computer on all the time for running a teamspeak server (very light use).
The computer freezes randomly, usualy when I'm not using it for a while (I use another computer for general use) The computer will just freeze, the screen stops, can't move the mouse, numlock on keyboard has no response. There's no event log on computer management. I have no idea what's going on.

I open the case and find that the cpu heatsink is cold. The fan of the CPU and PSU are working and don't seem to be overheat, I can eject the DVD-drive's tray. The screen stop, if it freezes for a long time, it will just have black screen. I can force shut down and start and work again.

So does can anyone know what's the problem? CPU failing? anything I can do to fix it? any help is appreciated :) 

The computer's spec:
Core2Duo 1.86Ghz
128mb ATI x600
3GB DDR2 Ram
2X 2TB drives,
DVD-burner
Window XP
a c 159 à CPUs
June 13, 2012 4:35:05 PM

First item to check is your power settings in the control panel of windows. Put your computer to sleep should be set to "never" unless your other software will trigger it to warm up. I still recommend checking all your system fans: cpu, power supply, and case fans. Clean all of them with a canned air solvent that evaporates on contact. It's the safest way to clean fans. Some folks use a vacuum cleaner, but I don't recommend that; heard of some systems failing to restart after using the vacuum. The canned air solvent sells for $5 or less.
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a b à CPUs
June 13, 2012 5:28:14 PM

Quote:
cpu heatsink is cold


Uhh...make sure the heatsink is one right; I'm suspecting overheating.
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June 13, 2012 5:41:22 PM

the computer is a business SFF, it has been use for few years without any problem.
anyway i can check if the CPU has problem?
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June 13, 2012 5:44:12 PM

o1die said:
First item to check is your power settings in the control panel of windows. Put your computer to sleep should be set to "never" unless your other software will trigger it to warm up. I still recommend checking all your system fans: cpu, power supply, and case fans. Clean all of them with a canned air solvent that evaporates on contact. It's the safest way to clean fans. Some folks use a vacuum cleaner, but I don't recommend that; heard of some systems failing to restart after using the vacuum. The canned air solvent sells for $5 or less.


the power is set to always on. I clean the fan from time to time. It doesnt have lots of dust at the moment.
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a c 159 à CPUs
June 13, 2012 6:13:30 PM

The hardrive usually has some software for testing; each manufacturer has their own, free for download. Run that and see if it passes. Then if the hardrive passes, I would replace the power supply; it could be overheating or failing. It's easier to replace than the motherboard, and cpus rarely fail.
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June 13, 2012 8:03:22 PM

o1die said:
The hardrive usually has some software for testing; each manufacturer has their own, free for download. Run that and see if it passes. Then if the hardrive passes, I would replace the power supply; it could be overheating or failing. It's easier to replace than the motherboard, and cpus rarely fail.


Would PSU fails lead to fail to supply power to CPU?
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June 13, 2012 8:26:01 PM

A faulty PSU can cause the symptoms you're experiencing since it supplies to power to all the components in your computer.
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a c 133 à CPUs
June 13, 2012 8:39:52 PM

lochy said:
the computer is a business SFF, it has been use for few years without any problem.
anyway i can check if the CPU has problem?

If the computer uses the stock HSF with plastic clips/pins, they might no longer be supplying sufficient contact pressure and may be causing the CPU to overheat.

Run a tool like CPUID Hardware Monitor to record min/max temperatures, if the Core2 ever gets over 80C, you probably have heatsink problems.
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June 13, 2012 10:52:44 PM

"If the computer uses the stock HSF with plastic clips/pins, they might no longer be supplying sufficient contact pressure ... "
... and the contact paste may have been dried out...
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a c 133 à CPUs
June 14, 2012 1:35:25 AM

pepe2907 said:
... and the contact paste may have been dried out...

The Intel paste is already practically dry to start with, which is fine since the dry materials (carbon, metals, metal oxides, etc.) are the main active ingredients in nearly every paste on the market.

The wet components in consumer pastes (often silicon oil/grease) are there mainly to facilitate manual application and help excess paste bleed out since humans would have a hard time (safely) applying the hundreds of pounds required to convince almost dry powder to stick to a heatsink. Not a problem for hydraulic presses.

The problem with dry pastes is that they are one-shot affairs since they lack the fluidity to reflow or "self-heal" if the bond between the TIM and surfaces ever gets broken by shock or excessive vibrations after the initial flow.

When the stock HSF starts loosening up, it takes increasingly less mechanical strain to break the TIM bond and the decreasing mounting pressure can also suck air into the TIM, somewhat like releasing the ketchup bottle after pouring some.
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June 14, 2012 6:15:23 AM

"The wet components in consumer pastes (often silicon oil/grease) are there mainly to facilitate manual application... "
Not exactly that, because if it completely dries out /and this include Intels/ it turns into dust /literally, because the ingredient keeping the dry material glued disappears/ and partially spills out.
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a c 133 à CPUs
June 14, 2012 12:17:59 PM

pepe2907 said:
Not exactly that, because if it completely dries out /and this include Intels/ it turns into dust /literally

I did not say that Intel's paste was completely 'dry', I said it was "almost dry" - just enough lubricant to make the paste stick.

If you scrape fresh Intel paste off the heatsink and try to put it back on, the stuff simply refuses to stick back on via normal means. Compared to typical goo, the Intel stuff (and most pre-applied pastes) are practically dry fresh out-of-the-box.
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June 19, 2012 8:51:09 PM

Some update: i tried the HWInfo ( http://www.hwinfo.com/ ) and the log showed that the CPU voltage and temperature were fine. The computer just stopped and crashed. Screen are stopped, cant move the mouse and thing like that. The CPU was cold, all the fans are moving. I can still use the computer after i restart it. The crashes are pretty random sometimes after one day, sometimes after 2 or more days.
anyone have any idea? I can upload the log if needed.
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June 20, 2012 11:27:00 AM

the computer usually act as a Teamspeak server, not for daily use and sometimes I stream movie for it. That's it.
It's jsut the way it freezes is very strange. The CPU heat-sink was cold, that's mean the CPU is not running?
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a b à CPUs
June 20, 2012 11:45:17 AM

Again, a cold heatsink indicates its not placed properly on the CPU.
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a b à CPUs
June 20, 2012 11:53:27 AM

A cold heatsink + old computer.. If the thermal paste was never replaced, then take off your heatsink and replace it with a new one. That's the first thing you should do.
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a c 133 à CPUs
June 20, 2012 12:39:09 PM

doron said:
A cold heatsink + old computer.. If the thermal paste was never replaced, then take off your heatsink and replace it with a new one. That's the first thing you should do.

The Intel paste does not 'dry', it already looks practically dry even when fresh and this is perfectly fine since the solids are what provide the heat transfer.

Plastic frame (if using stock HSF) + high temperature + time = plastic deformation = hopeless, need new HSF.

Changing the paste is futile if the plastic frame is no longer able to apply adequate pressure and the stock HSF seems engineered for failure this way around the three years mark since everyone I know who has owned a C2D/C2Q has had to replace their HSF because of this anywhere between 2.5 and 4 years. Replacing the paste only helps for the first 1-2 weeks, high core temperatures come back as soon as the paste has had enough time to spread out.
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June 20, 2012 6:16:56 PM

HI, i tried the HWInfo ( http://www.hwinfo.com/ ) and the log showed that the CPU voltage and temperature were fine. The computer just stopped and crashed. Screen are stopped, cant move the mouse and thing like that. The CPU was cold, all the fans are moving. I can still use the computer after i restart it. The crashes are pretty random sometimes after one day, sometimes after 2 or more days.
anyone have any idea? I can upload the log if needed.
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June 21, 2012 10:46:30 AM

Check your RAM for faults
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June 21, 2012 10:11:50 PM

I used ramtest for 11 hours.. no error
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Anonymous
a b à CPUs
September 7, 2012 10:21:50 AM

Have the same problem on more than 20 computers (hp7700) started a few weeks ago pointing towards a microsoft update.... most probably not hardware !!!!

Using Mcafee enterprise , that could also be the cause... What Antivirus are you using ?
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September 8, 2012 1:25:55 PM

Thanks for the reply..
u think so? I use symantec antivirus corporation edition.
It still like this from time to time ..
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May 18, 2013 2:38:49 PM

o1die said:
First item to check is your power settings in the control panel of windows. Put your computer to sleep should be set to "never" unless your other software will trigger it to warm up. I still recommend checking all your system fans: cpu, power supply, and case fans. Clean all of them with a canned air solvent that evaporates on contact. It's the safest way to clean fans. Some folks use a vacuum cleaner, but I don't recommend that; heard of some systems failing to restart after using the vacuum. The canned air solvent sells for $5 or less.


I think that this is not a proper solution. wot u need to do is try changing the cooling fan of the cpu and then clean the ram and its slots. how will you clean the ram? first take out the rams from the slot and then use a pencil eraser and rub it thoroughly through the silver section of the ram. then take a clean white clot and clean the ram across the silver section of the ram. once you are done leave the rams in a dry place then brush the ram slots with a soft bristles brush. then put the rams together again. I hope this will definitely work and sort out your issue.

regards,
Sr. Support Exec.
Wintech
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May 18, 2013 2:42:01 PM

lochy said:
HI, i tried the HWInfo ( http://www.hwinfo.com/ ) and the log showed that the CPU voltage and temperature were fine. The computer just stopped and crashed. Screen are stopped, cant move the mouse and thing like that. The CPU was cold, all the fans are moving. I can still use the computer after i restart it. The crashes are pretty random sometimes after one day, sometimes after 2 or more days.
anyone have any idea? I can upload the log if needed.


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May 18, 2013 2:52:47 PM

Computer freezes, CPU fails, solution?
Computer freezes, CPU fails, solution?
I recently have this problem. My computer HP dc7700 SFF freezes randomly.
I keep this computer on all the time for running a teamspeak server (very light use).
The computer freezes randomly, usualy when I'm not using it for a while (I use another computer for general use) The computer will just freeze, the screen stops, can't move the mouse, numlock on keyboard has no response. There's no event log on computer management. I have no idea what's going on.
I open the case and find that the cpu heatsink is cold. The fan of the CPU and PSU are working and don't seem to be overheat, I can eject the DVD-drive's tray. The screen stop, if it freezes for a long time, it will just have black screen. I can force shut down and start and work again.
So does can anyone know what's the problem? CPU failing? anything I can do to fix it? any help is appreciated
The computer's spec:
Core2Duo 1.86Ghz
128mb ATI x600
3GB DDR2 Ram
2X 2TB drives,
DVD-burner
Window XP

Hi Lochi, well the problem u r facing is not related to the cpu. i know it sounds fishy. my experience of 8 years tells me that the prob is with your hard drive. try unplugging your hard drive and then plug in a new hard drive but remember the old hard drives has all your data's.
after you plug in the new hard drive install windows and its drivers then check the performance of your system. I bet it will work fine. after this just shut down the computer and then plug in your old hard drives in slave mode. this will help you get back your system the way you want it.

good luck dear.

Sr. Support Exec.
WINTECH
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May 18, 2013 2:59:50 PM

Anonymous said:
Have the same problem on more than 20 computers (hp7700) started a few weeks ago pointing towards a microsoft update.... most probably not hardware !!!!

Using Mcafee enterprise , that could also be the cause... What Antivirus are you using ?


Hi dear, just uninstall mcafee coz its a third party antivirus and must be having a conflict with windows updates. use microsoft internet security on its behalf. it will help your pc boost up and at the same time protect your system in the best manner from viruses.

I assure you my help will work.

regards,
Sr. Support Exec.
WINTECH
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