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what are triband phones

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May 30, 2005 2:45:09 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

Hello ,
Could you please explain about Tri band phones! Do all the phones
support triband? what frequencies are supported by triband phones? Can
they be used all over the world, just by changing the sim cards?

More about : triband phones

May 30, 2005 10:28:39 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

On 29 May 2005 22:45:09 -0700, "dd" <duttdharm@yahoo.com> wrote:

>Hello ,
>Could you please explain about Tri band phones! Do all the phones
>support triband? what frequencies are supported by triband phones? Can
>they be used all over the world, just by changing the sim cards?

Triband phones are just what it says: three bands. Usually that
means either 900, 1800 and 1900 Mhz frequenies, but can mean 850, 1800
and 1900 Mhz frequencies. All phones do not support triband either
900, 1800, 1900 or 850, 1800, 1900.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 10:53:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

On 29 May 2005 22:45:09 -0700, "dd" <duttdharm@yahoo.com> wrote:

>Hello ,
>Could you please explain about Tri band phones! Do all the phones
>support triband? what frequencies are supported by triband phones? Can
>they be used all over the world, just by changing the sim cards?
>

No - not all 'phones support tri band.

From: http://www.phonescoop.com/glossary/term.php?gid=136

"Tri-Band

A GSM phone that supports three of the four major GSM frequency bands,
and will therefore work in most parts of the world.

There are two major types of tri-band GSM phones: European and
Americas.

European tri-band phones support the 900, 1800, and 1900 frequency
bands. They provide complete coverage in Europe, Africa, and Asia, and
work on at least one network in most countries in the Americas.

Americas tri-band phones support the 800/850, 1800, and 1900 frequency
bands. They provide complete coverage in the Americas, and will work
on at least one network in most countries in Europe, Africa, and Asia.


NOTE: This definition applies to the U.S. and Canada, and may not be
accurate for other countries".

See also:

http://www.phonescoop.com/glossary/term.php?gid=139

"Quad-Band

Designates a GSM phone that supports all four major GSM frequency
bands, making it compatible with all major GSM networks worldwide.

The four bands include the 800 (AKA 850) and 1900 bands - used in the
Americas - and 900/1800, used in most other parts of the world".

If your 'phone supports multiple bands (and it supports the correct
frequency for the country you are visiting) AND if your current (i.e.
your home) provider has a roaming agreement with the foreign network -
then you don't even need to change SIM cards to make the 'phone work.

Jump off the 'plane - wait until you are inside the airport, turn on
the 'phone and you will get a text message (SMS) from the carrier you
are now "roaming" with and your operator logo will change to that
carrier's logo for as long as you are on their network.

Note - I have used mine abroad and it is not uncommon for the 'phone
to be with carrier "A" at the hotel, carrier "B" in the city centre
and carrier "C" in the countryside and then go back to carrier "A"
when you get back to the hotel. It depends who has the best signal at
the time and who your home carrier has roaming agreements with and
where you are location wise in the country.

However, it is entirely possible (so long as your 'phone is not sim
locked i.e. your 'phone will ONLY accept a SIM card from the network
provider it was purchased from) to arrive in the foreign country and
buy a "pay as you go" SIM card for a few £ - top it up on your credit
card - and then pop it in your 'phone and make calls. This works well
when your provider does not have a roaming agreement with a provider
in your area.

I have seen 02 and Vodafone "pay as you go" SIM cards for sale here in
the UK for as little as 3.50 GBP - about 7 USD. They are available
from corner shops, garages, cell 'phone shops etc. Anotherwords they
are EASY to find in the UK.

Worst case - you can buy a "pay as you go" handset and SIM package
from Woolworths starting at 50 GBP (about 100 USD) - this would be
more than good enough to last you the duration of your vacation here
in the UK.

Hope this helps.

Casper
Anonymous
June 7, 2005 7:27:27 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

"dd" <duttdharm@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1117431909.255018.183790@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> Hello ,
> Could you please explain about Tri band phones! Do all the phones
> support triband? what frequencies are supported by triband phones? Can
> they be used all over the world, just by changing the sim cards?
>

Tri refers to 3 bands.

There currently are 4 bands used around the world. 800/1900 in the USA and
most of the Americas and 900/1800 used in most of the rest of the world.

So getting a Tri band instead of a quad (=4) band phone might be OK,
depending on where in the world you might be going.
!