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Velvia Vision - over the top??

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Anonymous
June 2, 2005 3:02:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

When I shot film, I used to like Velvia, so now I switched to digital,
I was interested to come across Fred Miranda's Velvia Vision plugin
that claims to give a "Velvia" look to images. However - looking at the
two examples on the website my reaction was "way too much!!!" The
colours are blown up out of all proportion!!

So, two questions:
1. Are these colour effects typical, or just chosen to emphasise what
dramatic effects are possible?
2. Are the effects very difficult to achieve, or will a judicious use
of PS get you to the same place?

Thanks for any insights!!

G;

--
Encrypted e-mail address. Click to mail me:
http://cerbermail.com/?nKYh3qN4YG

More about : velvia vision top

Anonymous
June 2, 2005 3:02:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"The Rev Gaston" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
news:3g6m2sFap5foU1@individual.net...
> When I shot film, I used to like Velvia, so now I switched to digital, I
> was interested to come across Fred Miranda's Velvia Vision plugin that
> claims to give a "Velvia" look to images. However - looking at the two
> examples on the website my reaction was "way too much!!!" The colours are
> blown up out of all proportion!!

So much of this will depend upon the saturation of the shot you start with.
Since it is impossible to know what shots people are applying the plug-in
to, it's impossible to know it's effectiveness.
Personally, I think enhancing photos in that way wouldn't really require a
pre-set action, since every shot is going to render differently depending on
white balance accuracy, camera-based color control/saturation, etc.

> So, two questions:
> 1. Are these colour effects typical, or just chosen to emphasise what
> dramatic effects are possible?

I don't think there CAN be a typical shot, for the reason described above.

> 2. Are the effects very difficult to achieve, or will a judicious use of
> PS get you to the same place?

PS will get you there rather easily.

-Mark
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 3:02:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>2. Are the effects very difficult to achieve, or will a judicious
>use of PS get you to the same place?

Should be able to get there quickly in PS with a Hue/Sat adjustment
layer and a Curves adjustment layer with an S-curve to boost contrast
.... you can easily create your own action to do this, apply the action
and then modify per taste depending on the image.

Bill
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Anonymous
June 2, 2005 3:02:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>Should be able to get there quickly in PS with a Hue/Sat adjustment
>layer and a Curves adjustment layer with an S-curve ...

Should also mention that if you're shooting RAW mode you can apply a
saturated tone curve for most cameras with the better converters, and
also adjust contrast and saturation with pretty much all the converters
I've used.
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 1:54:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Bill Hilton" <bhilton665@aol.com> wrote:

> >2. Are the effects very difficult to achieve, or will a judicious
>>use of PS get you to the same place?
>
> Should be able to get there quickly in PS with a Hue/Sat adjustment
> layer and a Curves adjustment layer with an S-curve to boost contrast
> ... you can easily create your own action to do this, apply the action
> and then modify per taste depending on the image.

I've found that the saturation control in PS is pretty ugly (it's more of a
brightening than a saturation increase in the plus direction), and can make
a mess of your data. (Surprisingly, the saturation in RSE seems quite nice.)

Years ago I saw a bootleg version of the Velvia action, and what it did was
to (1) convert to 16 bit, (2) convert to (I think) Lab space, (3) crank the
a and b channels, and (4) convert back.

Presumably, the a and b channel boost should be paramaterizable, I'd think.

David J. Littleboy
Tokyo, Japan
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 1:54:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Thu, 2 Jun 2005 09:54:34 +0900, "David J. Littleboy"
<davidjl@gol.com> wrote:


>Years ago I saw a bootleg version of the Velvia action, and what it did was
>to (1) convert to 16 bit, (2) convert to (I think) Lab space, (3) crank the
>a and b channels, and (4) convert back.
>
>Presumably, the a and b channel boost should be paramaterizable, I'd think.


You recall correctly. It's trivially easy:


1. Convert image to Lab space

Then increase contrast in the a and b channels
using either of the following methods:

2a. With the Curves tool, increase the
slope of the a and b channels.

2b. With the Levels tool, push in the
endpoints of the a and b channels.



rafe b.
http://www.terrapinphoto.com
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 3:10:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"rafe bustin" <rafe b at speakeasy dot net> wrote:
> "David J. Littleboy" <davidjl@gol.com> wrote:
>
>>Years ago I saw a bootleg version of the Velvia action, and what it did
>>was
>>to (1) convert to 16 bit, (2) convert to (I think) Lab space, (3) crank
>>the
>>a and b channels, and (4) convert back.
>>
>>Presumably, the a and b channel boost should be paramaterizable, I'd
>>think.
>
> You recall correctly. It's trivially easy:
>
> 1. Convert image to Lab space
>
> Then increase contrast in the a and b channels
> using either of the following methods:
>
> 2a. With the Curves tool, increase the
> slope of the a and b channels.
>
> 2b. With the Levels tool, push in the
> endpoints of the a and b channels.

I wasn't happy with 2a, but 2b is _nice_. Pull in the end points by 55 units
and the colors POP!

This is definitely the sort of thing that one would come back to one's
images a few years later and find extremely embarrassing<g>.

David J. Littleboy
Tokyo, Japan
!