Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Best Desktop for ME?!?!?

Tags:
  • New Build
  • Systems
  • Product
Last response: in Systems
Share
February 27, 2012 1:22:08 PM

Hello,
I am a recent grad doing low level design and drafting work with SolidWorks. I want to buy a PC Desktop for home that I can (1.) stream movies, (2.) do low to mid level SolidWorks modeling, (3.) surf the web with a few windows open while watching movies without lag, and (4.) eventually play Call of Duty on after I talk my wife into it:) ! On a side note...I am looking to eventually buy the Cintiq 21ux and install Autodesk Sketchbook Pro...I definately want to make sure there will be NO lag with all the layers and sketches for that setup.

I know that I wont have the best RealView capabilities for SolidWorks with a gaming card, but from reading other posts...it sounds like for what I will be doing, that the gaming cards I have in mind will suffice. One odd question I had is this...Can I have two completly different graphics card installed on the same machine and use them both for different purposes?, either by manually or automatically switching over between programs? Is there such a setup config?

I have looked at several desktop options, and would like the expert advice from the community. Here are my options so far...Keeping in mind that I'm not crazy about building one myself...(not enough knowledge, warranties, and I'm not worried about only saving 1-3 hundred bucks.)

1.- Alienware X51. Intel Core i7-2600 3.4 GHz
8GB Dual Channel DDR3 @ 1333 MHz
1GB GDDR5 nVIDIA GeForce GTX555
1TB SATA 6Gb/s 7,200RPM 32MB Cache

CONS that I have found: Tight space...will only be able to upgrade to 560Ti so far. Also, will only handle 330W power supply.

COST: $1,293.99

2.- HP Pavilion H8-1050. Intl Core i7-2600 3.4GHz. Intel H67 chipset.
10GB 1333 MHz DDR3. 1.5TB SATA 5400RPM. BluRay included. AMD Radeon HD 6850 (1GB GDDR5 dedicated)

COST: $1,399.99

3.- Dell XPS 8300. Intl Core i7-2600 (8MB Cache, 3.4GHz) 8GB DDR3 SDRAM @ 1333MHz. 1TB Performance RAID 0 (2 X 500GB SATA 3GB/s 7200 RPM HDDs) AMD Radeon HD 6770.

COST: $1,297.99

4.- Performancepc.net build. Chassis- NZXT H2 White. OCZ ModXstream 700W. Intl Core i7 2600K 3.8 GHZ. 10-19% Overclock. Corsair H60 Liquid Cooling Push/ Pull. ASUS P8Z68-V PRO Motherboard. 8GB corsair vengeance 1600mhz. 64GB Sandforce 1222 SSD. 1TB Western Digital Cavier Green. Nvidia GTX 560Ti.

COST: $1,690.99

In Conclusion: I am worried about the Alienware for possible expansion and Pwr Sply issues that I might come accros. Neutral on the HP, and feeling pretty good on the Dell XPS 8300 from what I have read. And the last one, was a noobie's attempt to build my own...I think:) ?

I am still worried about building myself and the self maintenance that might bring in the future, versus dropping it off at best buy for warranty repair. But I am definately not ruling that option out, provided I see a noticeable price difference and I am assured it will be somewhat easy to install stuff myself.

I look forward to hearing from everybody. Sorry it took so long, just wanted to make sure I covered everything.

Thanks,

Chance

More about : desktop

February 27, 2012 1:33:32 PM

build it urself
m
0
l
February 27, 2012 1:39:15 PM

Well this is a computer building forum, I would recommend building it yourself because:
1. You save money by not getting overcharged by aleinware or whoever.\
2. You can customize completly and dont have to choose somthing closest to what you want.
3. Its much easier to upgrade a system you built yourself if you buy good parts now.
4. Its a cool project, you learn somthing, and have somthing to show off.
m
0
l
Related resources
February 27, 2012 1:48:32 PM

you can play COD with a potato lolllllllllll!!!!!!!!!!!
m
0
l
February 27, 2012 4:15:48 PM

Quote:
Keeping in mind that I'm not crazy about building one myself...(not enough knowledge, warranties, and I'm not worried about only saving 1-3 hundred bucks.)


1) Building isn't as difficult as people think it is. Nowadays as long as you buy the right parts (which is why we're here) and install them correctly (plenty of guides around here on the Forums), you'll be fine.

2) Warranties are quite easy. Just file an RMA with the manufacturer and send it off. You don't get support from a company like Dell, but it's easier to send off a defective component than the whole system.

3) Saving $$$ isn't the only benefit - you also get better quality parts for the $. You'd be surprised the shortcuts companies will take to save a few cents per motherboard.

Quote:
1.- Alienware X51. Intel Core i7-2600 3.4 GHz
8GB Dual Channel DDR3 @ 1333 MHz
1GB GDDR5 nVIDIA GeForce GTX555
1TB SATA 6Gb/s 7,200RPM 32MB Cache

CONS that I have found: Tight space...will only be able to upgrade to 560Ti so far. Also, will only handle 330W power supply.

COST: $1,293.99

I don't think you can upgrade this at all. I believe the GPU is simply a mobile chip that was integrated into the motherboard. You could get a good i5 + 560Ti for this price.

Quote:
2.- HP Pavilion H8-1050. Intl Core i7-2600 3.4GHz. Intel H67 chipset.
10GB 1333 MHz DDR3. 1.5TB SATA 5400RPM. BluRay included. AMD Radeon HD 6850 (1GB GDDR5 dedicated)

COST: $1,399.99

Would not buy HP ever, especially now. They haven't decided whether or not they want to make money on computers.

Quote:
3.- Dell XPS 8300. Intl Core i7-2600 (8MB Cache, 3.4GHz) 8GB DDR3 SDRAM @ 1333MHz. 1TB Performance RAID 0 (2 X 500GB SATA 3GB/s 7200 RPM HDDs) AMD Radeon HD 6770.

COST: $1,297.99

Your GPU is going to be hurting here for your work...

Quote:
4.- Performancepc.net build. Chassis- NZXT H2 White. OCZ ModXstream 700W. Intl Core i7 2600K 3.8 GHZ. 10-19% Overclock. Corsair H60 Liquid Cooling Push/ Pull. ASUS P8Z68-V PRO Motherboard. 8GB corsair vengeance 1600mhz. 64GB Sandforce 1222 SSD. 1TB Western Digital Cavier Green. Nvidia GTX 560Ti.

COST: $1,690.99

You could easily trim this buy shopping around for parts.

Quote:
I am still worried about building myself and the self maintenance that might bring in the future, versus dropping it off at best buy for warranty repair.

Depends where you buy it - you may still have to send it off to the manufacturer.

Plus, generally only one or two components fail at a time in a self-built desktop. If you're in a pinch you can just replace those parts and keep them as spares once the new ones come back. With a prebuilt, you'll be completely without a computer.

m
0
l
February 28, 2012 5:33:05 AM

every body is right build ur own system
here is what u need

intel i7 2600
asus h67 mobo
4x4 gb corsair vengence 1600mhz ram
asus 560ti dc ii
crutial m4 120gb ssd
wd carvier black 500gb/1tb
cooler master haf 912 or 932 or even corsair 600t white edition
corsair hx 650w
asus dvd writer
monitor of ur preference asus, dell viewsonic etc make good monitor

this would come around 1000-1200 usd :) 
m
0
l
February 28, 2012 6:43:21 AM

if u have a budget then add i7 3820 and asus x79 v pro or x79ws the later is aimed for 24x7 operation
this would add around 400-600 my above build
m
0
l
February 28, 2012 8:25:44 AM

^you don't need i7 for gaming.
8GB is more than enough.
560ti is a mid range card.7950 is a sweet spot.
932 and 600t are good but expensive.912 is enough to run a sli setup.
tx650 is good enough.
m
0
l
February 29, 2012 8:34:26 AM

yes i would not suggest in the above reply about i7 and 560ti but it seemed like op was after these 2 thing and i would personally suggest a 7950 especially a xfx black edition with those to huge fans and for gaming i5 is more than enough :) 
m
0
l
!