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Cost of digital prints

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Anonymous
June 2, 2005 1:49:22 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

A buddy of mine has asked me to print 500 of his snapshots from his South
American vacation, and is insisting on paying me for the trouble. Given
that its 500 prints, I'm going to let him pay me something close to the
cost of paper and ink. The problem is that I haven't printed enough with my
new printer to have a good handle on what actual ink costs per print are
running.

Given that I'm using an 8 color Epson R1800, and most of the prints will be
3" X 4" or 4" X 5.5" on roll paper (Epson semigloss) with maybe a handful
(a dozen or two) 8 X 10s, what would you expect the out of pocket cost to
run?

On a related note, if he took the job to a run of the mill photo
lab/printer, what would they charge?

More about : cost digital prints

Anonymous
June 2, 2005 1:49:23 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Barry Bean" <bbbean@beancotton.com> wrote in message
news:Xns9668AB223DA69eatmorecotton@207.14.113.17...
>A buddy of mine has asked me to print 500 of his snapshots from his South
> American vacation, and is insisting on paying me for the trouble. Given
> that its 500 prints, I'm going to let him pay me something close to the
> cost of paper and ink. The problem is that I haven't printed enough with
> my
> new printer to have a good handle on what actual ink costs per print are
> running.
>
> Given that I'm using an 8 color Epson R1800, and most of the prints will
> be
> 3" X 4" or 4" X 5.5" on roll paper (Epson semigloss) with maybe a handful
> (a dozen or two) 8 X 10s, what would you expect the out of pocket cost to
> run?
>
> On a related note, if he took the job to a run of the mill photo
> lab/printer, what would they charge?

Costco or Sam's - $0.17 for a 4x6 - $2.00 for an 8x10. You can't compete
with that cost and your buddy will have photographs not inkjet prints that
need special handling.

Jim Kramer
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 1:49:23 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>
> Costco or Sam's - $0.17 for a 4x6 - $2.00 for an 8x10. You can't compete
> with that cost and your buddy will have photographs not inkjet prints that
> need special handling.
>
> Jim Kramer

Yeh but he can do better prints on the R1800.
If you just want to get your money back, set up for printing everything
on 8x10's. Get a copy of QImage so you can easily gang things together.
Charge about $2.50 per 8x10. You'll easily pay for QImage (about $50)
last I looked and have some fun printing. Hope your friend is a decent
photographer.

Tom
Related resources
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 1:49:23 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>For a little more, your friend can by a printer and do it himself, and have
>a printer left over when he is done.

Do not underestimate the cost of ink, or the time required, to make 500
prints.

You can buy a printer, sure, but you can't get, say, the Fuji Frontier
that the lab's going to use.
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 1:49:23 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Barry Bean" <bbbean@beancotton.com> wrote in message
news:Xns9668AB223DA69eatmorecotton@207.14.113.17...
> A buddy of mine has asked me to print 500 of his snapshots from his South
> American vacation, and is insisting on paying me for the trouble. Given
> that its 500 prints, I'm going to let him pay me something close to the
> cost of paper and ink. The problem is that I haven't printed enough with
my
> new printer to have a good handle on what actual ink costs per print are
> running.
>
> Given that I'm using an 8 color Epson R1800, and most of the prints will
be
> 3" X 4" or 4" X 5.5" on roll paper (Epson semigloss) with maybe a handful
> (a dozen or two) 8 X 10s, what would you expect the out of pocket cost to
> run?
>
> On a related note, if he took the job to a run of the mill photo
> lab/printer, what would they charge?



I think Snapfish is down to about 12 cents these days for 4x6 prints.


Patrick
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 1:49:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

jimkramer wrote:


> Costco or Sam's - $0.17 for a 4x6 - $2.00 for an 8x10. You can't compete
> with that cost and your buddy will have photographs not inkjet prints that
> need special handling.

Yes..

And if you consider that you'll be handling and
setting up 500 images on your computer, then
tending the printer as it prints them to make sure
you don't run out of paper/ink and to make sure
you don't see lines in the images from a clogged
print nozzles.....

It sounds like a very time consuming job.

If I have more than 12 images to print, I always
send them off to a commercial printer.
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 3:01:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Barry Bean wrote:
> A buddy of mine has asked me to print 500 of his snapshots from his South
> American vacation, and is insisting on paying me for the trouble. Given
> that its 500 prints, I'm going to let him pay me something close to the
> cost of paper and ink. The problem is that I haven't printed enough with my
> new printer to have a good handle on what actual ink costs per print are
> running.
>
> Given that I'm using an 8 color Epson R1800, and most of the prints will be
> 3" X 4" or 4" X 5.5" on roll paper (Epson semigloss) with maybe a handful
> (a dozen or two) 8 X 10s, what would you expect the out of pocket cost to
> run?
>
> On a related note, if he took the job to a run of the mill photo
> lab/printer, what would they charge?

Politely decline the job.
It will take you a looong time and a lot of headaches for NO gain.
Furthermore, you cannot print them for what Walmart or Costco can print
them. (17-20 cents)
If he wants to print 500 vacation pictures, he has not done a very good
job of culling them. Who the hell is going to look at 500 unculled
pictures anyway.
Bob Williams
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 3:19:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

There is a maximum amount of prints a printer will do before it starts to
wear out. Wear on your printer should be factored in your decision. As a
profesional photographer, I'd definitely recommend having a commercial
printer do them. I agree with those that recommended taking them to a Sam's
Club or Costco. Walmart also is a possibility. I'd suggest taking an image
and getting one print done. Compare it to what you saw on your monitor
.....look at density and color balance. I send almost all my work to my pro
lab but occacsionally get one or two done at Walmart. I take a full (12
level) .jpg and get good prints.

Craig Flory
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 3:26:16 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

tomm101 wrote:
>> Costco or Sam's - $0.17 for a 4x6 - $2.00 for an 8x10. You can't
>> compete with that cost and your buddy will have photographs not
>> inkjet prints that need special handling.
>>
>> Jim Kramer
>
> Yeh but he can do better prints on the R1800.
> If you just want to get your money back, set up for printing
> everything on 8x10's. Get a copy of QImage so you can easily gang
> things together. Charge about $2.50 per 8x10. You'll easily pay for
> QImage (about $50) last I looked and have some fun printing. Hope
> your friend is a decent photographer.
>
> Tom


For 500 prints. I would have them done. Especially as they are for
someone else. If you start making adjustments, and that is the real reason
to do it yourself, it is going to take forever.

--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
June 2, 2005 3:33:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Barry Bean" <bbbean@beancotton.com> wrote in message
news:Xns9668AB223DA69eatmorecotton@207.14.113.17...
> A buddy of mine has asked me to print 500 of his snapshots from his South
> American vacation, and is insisting on paying me for the trouble. Given
> that its 500 prints, I'm going to let him pay me something close to the
> cost of paper and ink. The problem is that I haven't printed enough with
my
> new printer to have a good handle on what actual ink costs per print are
> running.
>
> Given that I'm using an 8 color Epson R1800, and most of the prints will
be
> 3" X 4" or 4" X 5.5" on roll paper (Epson semigloss) with maybe a handful
> (a dozen or two) 8 X 10s, what would you expect the out of pocket cost to
> run?
>
> On a related note, if he took the job to a run of the mill photo
> lab/printer, what would they charge?

For a little more, your friend can by a printer and do it himself, and have
a printer left over when he is done.
June 2, 2005 5:06:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Barry Bean wrote:

> A buddy of mine has asked me to print 500 of his snapshots from his South
> American vacation, and is insisting on paying me for the trouble. Given
> that its 500 prints, I'm going to let him pay me something close to the
> cost of paper and ink. The problem is that I haven't printed enough with my
> new printer to have a good handle on what actual ink costs per print are
> running.
>
> Given that I'm using an 8 color Epson R1800, and most of the prints will be
> 3" X 4" or 4" X 5.5" on roll paper (Epson semigloss) with maybe a handful
> (a dozen or two) 8 X 10s, what would you expect the out of pocket cost to
> run?
>
> On a related note, if he took the job to a run of the mill photo
> lab/printer, what would they charge?

At a guess - I have an R1800 - and am also trying to get a feel for ink
use, then you will use probably one and a half cyan, magenta, and yellow
cartidges, and at least two or three gloss optimiser cartridges, and to
round things off, say half of the other cartridges. So you can easily
use $100 or more of ink. Premium paper add at least $100 or a little
more. My guess would be US$ 250 - excluding your time. So, your cost
for small prints is much higher than a lab - and that does not include
your time.
Forget the "wear and tear" on your printer. They are rated to do far
more prints than a home hobbyist would ever want to afford. I expect
that most of these printers will die from obsolescence - not over use.

He should get the snapshots done by a lab.
Nobody wants to look at 500 holiday snapshots.
Go through these and help him sort the ones he wants, and (photo quality
allowing) you can do some large prints at up to A3+ at a far superior
quality than he will probably be able to get at a photo lab.
Everybody will want to look at a dozen or so of the best photographs at
large size.
A 10x8 (on A4 with border) should be about $2.00 cost or a little more.
I think that full bleed A3 prints on matte (so no GO) cost me about US
$5.00 for ink and paper. (I am in New Zealand - and assume that you can
buy cartridges at around $12 each - as they cost me about NZ$20 if I
shop carefully - GO is much cheaper) This is approximately 1/3 of the
cost for "one-off" prints from a good lab, and is still much less than a
cheap lab.
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 5:06:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Wed, 01 Jun 2005 23:33:01 GMT, "Alan" <not.me@uhuh.rcn.com> wrote:

>
>"Barry Bean" <bbbean@beancotton.com> wrote in message
>news:Xns9668AB223DA69eatmorecotton@207.14.113.17...
>> A buddy of mine has asked me to print 500 of his snapshots from his South
>> American vacation, and is insisting on paying me for the trouble. Given
>> that its 500 prints, I'm going to let him pay me something close to the
>> cost of paper and ink. The problem is that I haven't printed enough with
>my
>> new printer to have a good handle on what actual ink costs per print are
>> running.
>>
>> Given that I'm using an 8 color Epson R1800, and most of the prints will
>be
>> 3" X 4" or 4" X 5.5" on roll paper (Epson semigloss) with maybe a handful
>> (a dozen or two) 8 X 10s, what would you expect the out of pocket cost to
>> run?
>>
>> On a related note, if he took the job to a run of the mill photo
>> lab/printer, what would they charge?
>
>For a little more, your friend can by a printer and do it himself, and have
>a printer left over when he is done.
>

and your friend will find out what a pain in the old arse he has
passed on to you....LOL


--

Scott in Florida
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 5:06:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Frederick <nomailplease@nomail.com> wrote in
news:1117674305.766944@ftpsrv1:

>Good information snipped<

> Nobody wants to look at 500 holiday snapshots.

Sure they do. He's a good photographer and a fearless traveler. He spends
3-6 months each year traveling in a different part of the world, and then
does an excellent job of putting together albums that are great
travelogues.

> Go through these and help him sort the ones he wants,

That's how he got to 500. He started with 2000.

> and (photo
> quality allowing) you can do some large prints at up to A3+ at a far
> superior quality than he will probably be able to get at a photo lab.
> Everybody will want to look at a dozen or so of the best photographs
> at large size.
> A 10x8 (on A4 with border) should be about $2.00 cost or a little
> more.
> I think that full bleed A3 prints on matte (so no GO) cost me about
> US
> $5.00 for ink and paper. (I am in New Zealand - and assume that you
> can buy cartridges at around $12 each - as they cost me about NZ$20 if
> I shop carefully - GO is much cheaper) This is approximately 1/3 of
> the cost for "one-off" prints from a good lab, and is still much less
> than a cheap lab.

Thanks for the info.
June 2, 2005 8:30:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Barry Bean wrote:

> Frederick <nomailplease@nomail.com> wrote in
> news:1117674305.766944@ftpsrv1:
>
>
>>Good information snipped<
>
>
>>Nobody wants to look at 500 holiday snapshots.
>
>
> Sure they do. He's a good photographer and a fearless traveler. He spends
> 3-6 months each year traveling in a different part of the world, and then
> does an excellent job of putting together albums that are great
> travelogues.
>
Heh,
Apologies for my assumption. Still, they really would have to be
incredible to keep me interested looking at that many - but maybe I just
have a short attention span...
Unless they are self expanatory - which is seldom the case, I also find
that such travel photos really need to be viewed in context - with some
explanation or anecdote recorded.

You have the tools to print the photos at fantastic quality, in the form
of a home-made magazine or book, and presenting the story as well as the
image. I just think that if it was me, I would be tempted to try to do
it that way. It would be a great project.

Please don't take this as me telling you what to do, or what's best.
Just some ideas of what I would consider doing myself.

>
>>Go through these and help him sort the ones he wants,
>
>
> That's how he got to 500. He started with 2000.
>
:-)
>
>>and (photo
>>quality allowing) you can do some large prints at up to A3+ at a far
>>superior quality than he will probably be able to get at a photo lab.
>>Everybody will want to look at a dozen or so of the best photographs
>>at large size.
>>A 10x8 (on A4 with border) should be about $2.00 cost or a little
>>more.
>> I think that full bleed A3 prints on matte (so no GO) cost me about
>> US
>>$5.00 for ink and paper. (I am in New Zealand - and assume that you
>>can buy cartridges at around $12 each - as they cost me about NZ$20 if
>>I shop carefully - GO is much cheaper) This is approximately 1/3 of
>>the cost for "one-off" prints from a good lab, and is still much less
>>than a cheap lab.
>
>
> Thanks for the info.
>
I'm interested to know, if you do end up printing a lot of these photos,
what your ink usage is. My printing is a bit sporadic on sizes, and on
different media, so it isn't easy to get a good estimate of cost.
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 8:30:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Frederick <nomailplease@nomail.com> wrote in news:1117686558.787280
@ftpsrv1:

> Please don't take this as me telling you what to do, or what's best.
> Just some ideas of what I would consider doing myself.

No prob. I appreciate the info.

BB
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 9:43:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Barry Bean wrote:
>
> A buddy of mine has asked me to print 500 of his snapshots from his South
> American vacation, and is insisting on paying me for the trouble. Given
> that its 500 prints, I'm going to let him pay me something close to the
> cost of paper and ink. The problem is that I haven't printed enough with my
> new printer to have a good handle on what actual ink costs per print are
> running.
>
> Given that I'm using an 8 color Epson R1800, and most of the prints will be
> 3" X 4" or 4" X 5.5" on roll paper (Epson semigloss) with maybe a handful
> (a dozen or two) 8 X 10s, what would you expect the out of pocket cost to
> run?
>
> On a related note, if he took the job to a run of the mill photo
> lab/printer, what would they charge?

The following remarks may be a bit touchy, and no offense is intended.

If your buddy is a seasoned traveller and taken many shots the past, how
did he have those printed?

I wonder if he is expecting to get them cheaper from you than a from a
lab, or did you 'kind of' offer to do them? 500 prints plus 20 or so
10x8's will take you some considerable time to do. If he likes them,
you are in line to do the next trip, and the next. If he doesn't like
them, it could strain the friendship - as could multiple print requests.

Effectively, you will be competing with the likes of a Frontier, and
they can do 1,500 prints per hour.

I had drummed into me years ago the saying that friends and business
don't mix, and I've found that to be very true.

Hope it works out for you,

Colin
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 9:43:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Colin D <ColinD@killspam.127.0.0.1> wrote in
news:429E9C86.B3CB8F9B@killspam.127.0.0.1:

> The following remarks may be a bit touchy, and no offense is intended.
>
> If your buddy is a seasoned traveller and taken many shots the past,
> how did he have those printed?

This is the first year he went digital. In the past, having me print
photos wasn't an option (I only work wit b&w in my darkroom).

> I wonder if he is expecting to get them cheaper from you than a from a
> lab, or did you 'kind of' offer to do them? 500 prints plus 20 or so
> 10x8's will take you some considerable time to do. If he likes them,
> you are in line to do the next trip, and the next. If he doesn't like
> them, it could strain the friendship - as could multiple print
> requests.

We're very good friends. He asked if I could do it, and I agreed to. We
work together on a lot of collaborative projects. He's made it clear he
expects to pay whatever it costs to print the pics - price is up to me.
But thanks for your concern.

> I had drummed into me years ago the saying that friends and business
> don't mix, and I've found that to be very true.

The vast majority of my customers are friends. The rule doesn't always
apply.
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 9:43:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 2 Jun 2005 13:18:47 GMT, Barry Bean wrote:

> We're very good friends. He asked if I could do it, and I agreed to. We
> work together on a lot of collaborative projects. He's made it clear he
> expects to pay whatever it costs to print the pics - price is up to me.
> But thanks for your concern.

I hope that includes the cost of your time, which might easily
take several long days unless you automate the process and don't
spend any time trying to get the most out of each picture. This may
be OK if your friend considers the small prints to be essentially
"proofs", but then he could get them made by almost any processor
for much less cost. Alternatively, you could offer him the use of
your computer at no charge for the OJT he'd get from doing the job
himself. He might find it very educational, especially if he was
responsible for providing his own paper and ink. Have you ever had
to quickly print more than 100 photos? I have, and it was much more
work than I expected, but that may be due to the software I used as
well as the rather feeble computer that was used.

Even if you print everything yourself, your friend should be on
hand for at least the first dozen or so. This way he can give you
some feedback, so you'll have some assurance that he'll be satisfied
with the pictures and with your effort, and won't want to have the
job re-done. Lastly, as some others have already mentioned, your
printer doesn't have an infinite life, and 500 pictures might
represent a not insignificant chunk of its useable life, whether of
the printer as a whole, or its print heads.
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 11:07:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Barry Bean wrote:

> A buddy of mine has asked me to print 500 of his snapshots from his South
> American vacation, and is insisting on paying me for the trouble. Given
> that its 500 prints, I'm going to let him pay me something close to the
> cost of paper and ink. The problem is that I haven't printed enough with my
> new printer to have a good handle on what actual ink costs per print are
> running.
>
> Given that I'm using an 8 color Epson R1800, and most of the prints will be
> 3" X 4" or 4" X 5.5" on roll paper (Epson semigloss) with maybe a handful
> (a dozen or two) 8 X 10s, what would you expect the out of pocket cost to
> run?
>
> On a related note, if he took the job to a run of the mill photo
> lab/printer, what would they charge?



Oh yeah this definitely doesn't make sense. I'd go bonkers making 500
prints. He could just buy a printer if he wants 500 prints. I don't
think I've done that many prints in 5 years, though I usually only
bother for 8x10's & don't print much. At work I used to hate doing
printing more than anything, so many things can go wrong, it's so slow
and tedious and the horrible droning noise of the printer & having to
reload paper. Agh!

Have him send them to wallmart & offer to do a dozen custom 8x10's where
you can afford to do some tweaking and at least learn from the experience.
Anonymous
June 3, 2005 12:57:32 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Barry Bean" <bbbean@beancotton.com> wrote in message
news:Xns9668AB223DA69eatmorecotton@207.14.113.17...
> A buddy of mine has asked me to print 500 of his snapshots from his South

You'll be sick to death of the sight of your printer after doing that, and
your friend will get better, and cheaper, from a lab. Snapshots, as you call
them, are just not worth printing in any great quantity at home.

And don't forget, it's not just the cost of materials you would have to
cover - you would also have to factor in some element of cost towards your
replacement printer following the wear and tear from 500 prints. How much?
Difficult - how many prints is your printer good for?

Don't do it.
H.
Anonymous
June 3, 2005 1:36:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

ASAAR <caught@22.com> wrote in
news:1sru91h5c5e8anrdb7kj6ejdvv34k4pfo0@4ax.com:

> On 2 Jun 2005 13:18:47 GMT, Barry Bean wrote:
>
>> We're very good friends. He asked if I could do it, and I agreed to.
>> We work together on a lot of collaborative projects. He's made it
>> clear he expects to pay whatever it costs to print the pics - price
>> is up to me. But thanks for your concern.
>
> I hope that includes the cost of your time,

No. It doesn't. I'm not doing this as a business venture. I'm doing a
friend a favor. He didn't charge me for his time when he helped me cater
an event or when he cleaned my shed, either. This is a favor I'm doing
for a friend.

> Have you ever had
> to quickly print more than 100 photos?

Who said anything about quickly? That said, I did run off 80 or 90 small
prints yesterday afternoon to distribute to several friends who'd helped
me with a project. Took maybe an hour or so of concentrated effort
spread out over the afternoon. I worked on the pictures between phone
calls.

> Even if you print everything yourself, your friend should be on
> hand for at least the first dozen or so. This way he can give you
> some feedback, so you'll have some assurance that he'll be satisfied
> with the pictures and with your effort, and won't want to have the
> job re-done.

He's seen my work. He's satisfied. And while he expects high quality
images, this isn't a wedding album that's going to be studied for flaws
by the mother of the bride. He expects a faithful reproduction of what
he captured with the camera, and doesn't expect any cropping or editing
beyond obvious corrections.

> Lastly, as some others have already mentioned, your
> printer doesn't have an infinite life, and 500 pictures might
> represent a not insignificant chunk of its useable life, whether of
> the printer as a whole, or its print heads.

If 500 prints represents a not insignificant portion of the printer's
usable life, then I will be joining a great many dissatisfied custiomers
demanding to know why Epson released a $500 printer (R1800)to the
serious amateur/low end professional market that only had a lifespan of
a few thousand prints. To the contrary, I reasonably expect this printer
to become technologically obsolete long before it is in danger of being
worn out, even if I print several thousand prints per year.
Anonymous
June 3, 2005 1:36:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 2 Jun 2005 21:36:44 GMT, Barry Bean wrote:

>> I hope that includes the cost of your time,
>
> No. It doesn't. I'm not doing this as a business venture. I'm doing a
> friend a favor. He didn't charge me for his time when he helped me cater
> an event or when he cleaned my shed, either. This is a favor I'm doing
> for a friend.

Understand. But both of you, and most people have a good idea of
the time and effort required for chores such as cleaning a shed,
unless they've never cleaned, or only had people clean for them. :) 
And speaking of the time and effort . . .


>> Even if you print everything yourself, your friend should be on
>> hand for at least the first dozen or so.
>
> He's seen my work. He's satisfied. And while he expects high quality
> images, this isn't a wedding album that's going to be studied for flaws
> by the mother of the bride. He expects a faithful reproduction of what
> he captured with the camera, and doesn't expect any cropping or editing
> beyond obvious corrections.

It still might be wise to have him watch while you produce a small
number of prints. As you said, he went digital just this year and
may have no concept of what kind of time and effort you're putting
in for him. The more he knows, the better able he'll be to make
fair requests of you in the future.



> If 500 prints represents a not insignificant portion of the printer's
> usable life, then I will be joining a great many dissatisfied custiomers
> demanding to know why Epson released a $500 printer (R1800)to the
> serious amateur/low end professional market that only had a lifespan of
> a few thousand prints. To the contrary, I reasonably expect this printer
> to become technologically obsolete long before it is in danger of being
> worn out, even if I print several thousand prints per year.

On average your printer should last a fairly long time. But I
think I've seen a number of Epson users here that have gotten a much
shorter life than they expected. Not that the printer always fails
completely, but sometimes something happens to reduce its output
quality. I don't recall if they had one of the better printers such
as your R1800, so that may make a difference.

If you are able to make several thousand prints per year for
several years you'll be getting very good value for your $500. My
$300 HP printer is fairly old but has not been used nearly as
extensively, never reaching 500 prints in any one year. Several
weeks ago the black output started to resemble what's produced by a
clogged print head. As this model's print heads are part of the
cartridge, a new black cartridge was installed, but it didn't help
at all. Time to go shopping again . . .
Anonymous
June 3, 2005 3:41:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Barry Bean wrote:
>
> The vast majority of my customers are friends. The rule doesn't always
> apply.

A fine point in conclusion: If a person is a customer first, and
becomes a friend, well and good; but if a friend becomes a customer, the
friendship may suffer. You have to weigh up the risk to the
relationship.

Good luck,

Colin.
Anonymous
June 3, 2005 10:35:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I want to add that I ROUTINELY get 50-100 prints of ONE original. I
wouldn't dream of doing them at home, even tho after the initial tweek
they would all be the same.

I do photos and creation of 6x4s that are used as postcards by actors
and models. I usually order the prints myslef.

When I do community events, I post to SmugMug and let the event
particpants order from there.

The actors have their own domain names pointing to SmugMug
album/portfolio/gallery where linking maybe be disable depending on
wish of actor.

Sweaty hands won't mess up the photo lab prints!!!!!
Anonymous
June 5, 2005 3:53:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"ASAAR" <caught@22.com> wrote in message
news:o q5v91tarq657du657tdhrm04fftpropka@4ax.com...
> On 2 Jun 2005 21:36:44 GMT, Barry Bean wrote:
>
> >> I hope that includes the cost of your time,
> >
> > No. It doesn't. I'm not doing this as a business venture. I'm doing a
> > friend a favor. He didn't charge me for his time when he helped me cater
> > an event or when he cleaned my shed, either. This is a favor I'm doing
> > for a friend.
>
> Understand. But both of you, and most people have a good idea of
> the time and effort required for chores such as cleaning a shed,
> unless they've never cleaned, or only had people clean for them. :) 
> And speaking of the time and effort . . .
>
>
> >> Even if you print everything yourself, your friend should be on
> >> hand for at least the first dozen or so.
> >
> > He's seen my work. He's satisfied. And while he expects high quality
> > images, this isn't a wedding album that's going to be studied for flaws
> > by the mother of the bride. He expects a faithful reproduction of what
> > he captured with the camera, and doesn't expect any cropping or editing
> > beyond obvious corrections.
>
> It still might be wise to have him watch while you produce a small
> number of prints. As you said, he went digital just this year and
> may have no concept of what kind of time and effort you're putting
> in for him. The more he knows, the better able he'll be to make
> fair requests of you in the future.
>
>
>
> > If 500 prints represents a not insignificant portion of the printer's
> > usable life, then I will be joining a great many dissatisfied custiomers
> > demanding to know why Epson released a $500 printer (R1800)to the
> > serious amateur/low end professional market that only had a lifespan of
> > a few thousand prints. To the contrary, I reasonably expect this printer
> > to become technologically obsolete long before it is in danger of being
> > worn out, even if I print several thousand prints per year.
>
> On average your printer should last a fairly long time. But I
> think I've seen a number of Epson users here that have gotten a much
> shorter life than they expected. Not that the printer always fails
> completely, but sometimes something happens to reduce its output
> quality. I don't recall if they had one of the better printers such
> as your R1800, so that may make a difference.
>
> If you are able to make several thousand prints per year for
> several years you'll be getting very good value for your $500. My
> $300 HP printer is fairly old but has not been used nearly as
> extensively, never reaching 500 prints in any one year. Several
> weeks ago the black output started to resemble what's produced by a
> clogged print head. As this model's print heads are part of the
> cartridge, a new black cartridge was installed, but it didn't help
> at all. Time to go shopping again . . .

Yea the odds are he has no idea of the time and effort this will require.
If you sit him down for 30 mins while you do the work he might decide to pay
you more or just get them done at a shop.
!