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Feb Gaming Build $1200ish

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February 28, 2012 1:32:20 PM

Hi everyone,

I'm new to this site as a registered member but I have been visiting for some time now. I've searched through this site and found a lot of great information on home builds but I still would like your feedback on this build. This is my build thus far which I'm hoping we can find some savings and efficiencies along the way. The only thing I'm set is the CPU and GPU although I was having a hard time identifying the difference between the two EVGA GTX 570s with a 10.00 price difference. Anywho, This build's purpose is mainly for gaming (Crysis, Battlefield 3 yada yada). I'm thinking I could save some money with the PSU and a smaller HDD. Anywho, here it is.

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium - Microsoft Software; Software

$182.71

You save:
$17.28 ( 9%)

Corsair HX Professional Series 750-Watt 80 Plus Certified Power Supply Compatible with Core i7 and Core i5 - CMPSU-750HX - Corsair

$143.99

You save:
$14.00 ( 9%)


EVGA GeForce GTX 570 HD Superclocked 1280 MB GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 Dual DVI/HDMI/Display Port SLI Ready Limited Lifetime Warranty Graphics Card, 012-P3-1573-AR - EVGA

$329.99

You save:
$25.00 ( 7%)

Western Digital 750 GB Caviar Blue SATA 6 Gb/s 7200 RPM 32 MB Cache Bulk/OEM Desktop Hard Drive - WD7500AALX - Western Digital

$114.99

You save:
$5.00 ( 4%)

Crucial 128 GB m4 2.5-Inch Solid State Drive SATA 6Gb/s CT128M4SSD2 - Crucial Technology

$164.99

You save:
$48.00 ( 23%)


Antec Mid-Tower Gaming Case Nine Hundred Two V3 - Antec

$132.78

You save:
$37.17 ( 22%)

ASUS P8P67-M PRO LGA 1155 SATA 6Gbps and USB 3.0 Supported Intel P67 DDR3 2200 Micro ATX Motherboard - Asus

$134.99

You save:
$9.01 ( 6%)

Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO CPU Cooler (RR-212E-20PK-R1) - Cooler Master

$41.04

Intel Core i5-2500K Processor - Intel

$224.54

You save:
$55.36 ( 20%)

Ram suggestion?

This is all off of Amazon. I tried to keep it on one site since I was stuck compiling this list on a mobile device.


a c 92 B Homebuilt system
February 28, 2012 4:16:34 PM

It's a good start but no need to spend $200 on a Windows 7 license when you can get the OEM for 1/2 that. Also the PSU is kind of overkill for this build - you don't really need a modular one, and I'm not the biggest fan of the Antec 900 either. There's way better cases for the price.

Try this for a $1200 build:

Case: Corsair Carbide 400R - $99.99 ($10.00 MIR)
PSU: Corsair Enthusiast Series TX650 V2 - $89.99 ($10.00 MIR)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z68XP-UD3P - $189.99
CPU: 3.30GHz Intel Core i5-2500K - $224.99
Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 Evo - $34.99
RAM: Mushkin Enhanced Silverline 1333MHz 1.5V - $38.99
SSD: 64GB Crucial M4 - $112.99
HD: 2TB Seagate Barracuda Green - $129.99
Optical: Samsung DVD Burner - $15.99
Video Card: EVGA Geforce GTX 560TI - $249.99 ($20.00 MIR)
OS: Windows 7 Home Premium - $99.99

Total: $1,282.89 - $40.00 MIR = $1,242.89

With this build you get a better motherboard, better case, the GPU isn't as good but it's still one of the best for the price, and you get a way bigger hard drive.
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February 28, 2012 5:27:54 PM

Thanks for the suggestions G-Unit. I always thought Seagate was an alright company as well but over the past few months I've been seeing a lot of negative feedback and comment geared towards their products. That's why I went on to select Western Digital.
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Related resources
a b B Homebuilt system
February 28, 2012 5:54:45 PM

Go with Western Digital, Nothing wrong with Seagate, i use their drivers. I just have more Western Digital drives. and no issues on any of them, one is a external driver, and its fallen off the desk a couple times and its still working. As for a memory recommendation, the Corsair or Mushkin, or Kingston, or Patriot. all good brands. anything fron 1600MHZ to 1866. you would be fine. i use Patriot Signature Series 1333MHZ and Kingston Hyperx 1600mhz. both 8 gig kits. never had a issue
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a b B Homebuilt system
February 28, 2012 6:18:20 PM

If you're going for a SSD, I highly recommend a 120GB minimum. I've got the 128GB M4 and after basic OS and utility install and a few games, I've got 30 GB left. A 64 GB means you've got one, maybe two games installed before you start to run out of room. I'd much rather cut the HDD to a single TB if it means doubling your SSD capacity. I think many people get carried away with HDD capacity. Unless you're planning to store massive amounts of video and music in crazy high fidelity formats, are you REALLY going to exceed 1TB of storage before you upgrade again? I think a lot of people could easily get by with 750GB or even 500GB.

G is correct on the PSU, a good 650W will be more than adequate.

RAM, I've become a fan of G. Skill, though the others mentioned are quality brands as well. I wouldn't spend extra on anything above 1333, though. The performance gain is marginal compared to the increased cost. And if you can shave a little here and there ( like RAM or maybe the case, ) it might add up to an extra $40 for a better GPU.
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February 28, 2012 6:42:38 PM

I have replaced the 750gb WD with a 500gb as I'm really only going to store music on there, not so much for videos. I'd get an external hard drive for movies in the future if needed. I was thinking about even dropping it down to a 320gb but the savings is only 10.00 bucks I believe.

Also changed Win 7 to the OEM 99.99 version.

Can you recommend a worthy PSU model. I was nervous when selecting this item due to the horror stories I've read over cheap PSU. Also, will I have any issues with clearance both with the case and ram once I install the Hyper 212 Evo?
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a b B Homebuilt system
February 28, 2012 6:50:14 PM

Benbon86 said:
Can you recommend a worthy PSU model.
The Corsair G linked is a worthy choice.

Benbon86 said:
Also, will I have any issues with clearance both with the case and ram once I install the Hyper 212 Evo?
Which case are you looking at? The Carbide or the Nine Hundred?
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February 28, 2012 7:11:04 PM

RedJaron said:
The Corsair G linked is a worthy choice.

Which case are you looking at? The Carbide or the Nine Hundred?


I'm looking at the 902 v3 at the moment. For some reason it seems to be the only case I can find that has great reviews alll around. I was aiming at CM after they released their new series of cases like the Sniper or Enforcer but the more I dug the more I found that I didn't like. Antec 902 v3 it is so far.
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February 28, 2012 7:35:53 PM

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... - $114.99
Antec Nine Hundred Two V3 Black Steel ATX Mid Tower Gaming Case

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... - $224.99
Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge 3.3GHz (3.7GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 3000 BX80623I52500K

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... - $34.99
COOLER MASTER Hyper 212 EVO RR-212E-20PK-R2 Continuous Direct Contact 120mm Sleeve CPU Cooler Compatible with latest Intel 2011/1366/1155 and AMD FM1/AM3+

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... - $46.99
G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-8GBXL

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... - $129.99
ASRock Z68 Extreme3 Gen3 LGA 1155 Intel Z68 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... - $84.99
Seagate Barracuda ST500DM002 500GB 7200 RPM 16MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... - $16.99
SAMSUNG 22X DVD Burner 22X DVD+R 8X DVD+RW 8X DVD+R DL 22X DVD-R 6X DVD-RW 16X DVD-ROM 48X CD-R 24X CD-RW 48X CD-ROM SATA Model SH-222BB/BEBE - OEM

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... - $99.99
Antec EarthWatts Series EA-750 Green 750W ATX12V v2.3 SLI Certified CrossFire Certified 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC Continuous Power Supply

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... - $99.99
Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit - OEM

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... - $349.99 - $20MIR
EVGA SuperClocked 012-P3-1572-AR GeForce GTX 570 (Fermi) 1280MB 320-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card

Total: $1203.90 - $20MIR
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a b B Homebuilt system
February 28, 2012 7:37:15 PM

I'm not certain on that. That case is 8.6" wide and the cooler is 6.25" tall, leaving 2.35" for case wall thickness, mboard mounting height, CPU thickness, etc. I would hazard a guess that it would fit, but I can't say for certain.
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February 28, 2012 7:44:00 PM

drunkducki said:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... - $114.99
Antec Nine Hundred Two V3 Black Steel ATX Mid Tower Gaming Case

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... - $224.99
Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge 3.3GHz (3.7GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 3000 BX80623I52500K

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... - $34.99
COOLER MASTER Hyper 212 EVO RR-212E-20PK-R2 Continuous Direct Contact 120mm Sleeve CPU Cooler Compatible with latest Intel 2011/1366/1155 and AMD FM1/AM3+

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... - $46.99
G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-8GBXL

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... - $129.99
ASRock Z68 Extreme3 Gen3 LGA 1155 Intel Z68 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... - $84.99
Seagate Barracuda ST500DM002 500GB 7200 RPM 16MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... - $16.99
SAMSUNG 22X DVD Burner 22X DVD+R 8X DVD+RW 8X DVD+R DL 22X DVD-R 6X DVD-RW 16X DVD-ROM 48X CD-R 24X CD-RW 48X CD-ROM SATA Model SH-222BB/BEBE - OEM

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... - $99.99
Antec EarthWatts Series EA-750 Green 750W ATX12V v2.3 SLI Certified CrossFire Certified 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC Continuous Power Supply

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... - $99.99
Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit - OEM

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... - $349.99 - $20MIR
EVGA SuperClocked 012-P3-1572-AR GeForce GTX 570 (Fermi) 1280MB 320-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card

Total: $1203.90 - $20MIR


Not a bad setup Drunk. I will say that I'm probably going to stick with the ASUS for the BIOS setup which look pretty nice but I think you're right with the memory cut. I can either wait to purchase a HDD or wait to pick up the SSD. I'm not sure which is of the two would be a wiser decision as I'm assuming it would be easier to do a clean OS install on the SSD versus installing on the HDD and then transfering that data over to the SSD.
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February 28, 2012 7:46:03 PM

RedJaron said:
I'm not certain on that. That case is 8.6" wide and the cooler is 6.25" tall, leaving 2.35" for case wall thickness, mboard mounting height, CPU thickness, etc. I would hazard a guess that it would fit, but I can't say for certain.


That has me worried...I might wait until I can find someone else out there with that setup unless there is another cooler available that is shorter with the same results. The Evo 212 seems to be the bees knees so far from a consumer standpoint.
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a b B Homebuilt system
February 28, 2012 8:20:31 PM

Benbon86 said:
Not a bad setup Drunk. I will say that I'm probably going to stick with the ASUS for the BIOS setup which look pretty nice
If you want to stick with Asus, at least get a Z68 board. Any reason you want a micro ATX?
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February 28, 2012 9:21:00 PM

RedJaron said:
If you want to stick with Asus, at least get a Z68 board. Any reason you want a micro ATX?


I have no hands on experience with either of these boards but from the research I've done so far, it has been claimed that the p67 boards yield better frame rates when compared to the z68 which is pretty much all this build will be used for. Several other resources also claim that typically the p67 boards come with faster sata / usb. I have can't say I trust Asrock as much since they are owned by ASUS and are the "cheaper" version although I hear they've come a long way. I've heard nothing but good things about gigabyte but for some reason I haven't seen many of their mobos used when researching custom builds so I didn't rly consider them.
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a c 92 B Homebuilt system
February 28, 2012 9:23:40 PM

Benbon86 said:
Thanks for the suggestions G-Unit. I always thought Seagate was an alright company as well but over the past few months I've been seeing a lot of negative feedback and comment geared towards their products. That's why I went on to select Western Digital.


Seagate or WD are fine - you can't go wrong either way, I've never had good luck with Hitachi HDs and I generally try to stay away from them. Samsung actually sold their HD division to Seagate.
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a b B Homebuilt system
February 28, 2012 10:11:51 PM

Benbon86 said:
I have no hands on experience with either of these boards but from the research I've done so far, it has been claimed that the p67 boards yield better frame rates when compared to the z68 which is pretty much all this build will be used for. Several other resources also claim that typically the p67 boards come with faster sata / usb. I have can't say I trust Asrock as much since they are owned by ASUS and are the "cheaper" version although I hear they've come a long way. I've heard nothing but good things about gigabyte but for some reason I haven't seen many of their mobos used when researching custom builds so I didn't rly consider them.

Asus has long been considered one of the best, if not the best, board manufacturer. Their boards tend to be more expensive than others, but are usually very full featured. I'll admit I'm not as familiar with ASRock, but I've had nothing but good experience with their Z68 Extreme4 Gen3 board I got last year. My experience with GB and MSI is that they're the more plain boards. They don't lack in quality or reliability ( indeed many people see marginally better overclocking on them, ) but they don't usually have as many features or options as you'll see on an Asus or ASRock board. Then again, they are generally less expensive too. My guess as to why you haven't seen them as often is that if people a spending a good chunk of change, they pay for the fuller featured boards.

As for framerates on a P67 vs a Z68, according to these comparisons ( high-end P67 and high-end Z68 boards both using 2600K and GTX 580, ) the Z68 almost always comes out ahead at the higher resolutions and detail levels. But in general, the mboard has such a low impact on game performance compared to the CPU and GPU.

As for the SATA / USB performance, I don't know about that. My gut says that HDD / SSD performance on either chipset is more dependent on the drives logic that on the SATA controller.
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February 28, 2012 10:35:38 PM

That's very true and thank you for providing that information. The mobo has been the most difficult component for me to lock down on this build. Based off of the above information, can you suggest a good z68 board that suits the build or a link? I'm attempting to get this all figured out before the weekend. On a side note, I'm considering SLI in the future. Any info you can provide is greatly appreciated.
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a b B Homebuilt system
February 29, 2012 4:28:37 PM

That depends on your desired features on the board.

What's your budget for the board? ( minimal, mid-range, all out, or a $$$ figure. )
What kind of rear I/O panel jacks do you need? ( PS/2, USB 2.0, USB 3.0, eSATA, powered eSATA, firewire, audio jacks, etc. )
Do you want PCIe 3.0 support?
Internal USB 3.0 headers?
How many internal USB 2.0 headers?
How many SATA 6 ports?
How many SATA 3 ports?
How many regular PCIe slots?
Do you need legacy PCI slots?
Integrated Wi-Fi?
What kind of overclocking, if any, are you planning?

Answer those and I can get you a better recommendation.
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February 29, 2012 7:26:15 PM

RedJaron said:
That depends on your desired features on the board.

What's your budget for the board? ( minimal, mid-range, all out, or a $$$ figure. )
What kind of rear I/O panel jacks do you need? ( PS/2, USB 2.0, USB 3.0, eSATA, powered eSATA, firewire, audio jacks, etc. )
Do you want PCIe 3.0 support?
Internal USB 3.0 headers?
How many internal USB 2.0 headers?
How many SATA 6 ports?
How many SATA 3 ports?
How many regular PCIe slots?
Do you need legacy PCI slots?
Integrated Wi-Fi?
What kind of overclocking, if any, are you planning?

Answer those and I can get you a better recommendation.


That's a great question and with this being my first build, I couldn't even tell you the difference between a normal pci slot vs a legacy pci slot. ...sad i know. What I can say is I would like a semi future proof build that leaves certain avenues open in the future. Integrated wifi would be a nice option to have. I do plan on overclocking in the future as well as going SLI. I also plan to add an SSD. Last night I compiled a build with a ASUS z68 v pro which worked with my budget. $1500 is the max but im trying to keep it at 1300 so I can purchase an audio system to compliment the build.
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February 29, 2012 7:45:55 PM

I'm posting on here from my phone so my apologies if the format is horrible. What I has so far is this:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Samsung dvd burner - 26.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Anted 902 - 114.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
WD cav blue 500gb 7200rpm - 89.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
EVA super clocked GTX 570 - 349.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
TX650v2 Corsair - 89.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Ripjaws 1866 ddr3 2 x 4gb 59.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
ASUS z68 v pro - 204.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
INTEL I5 2500k - 224.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Windows 7 64 bit - 99.99

It comes out to 1251.91 with 40-50 dollars in mail in rebates.
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a b B Homebuilt system
February 29, 2012 9:14:35 PM

Benbon86 said:
That's a great question and with this being my first build, I couldn't even tell you the difference between a normal pci slot vs a legacy pci slot. ...sad i know. What I can say is I would like a semi future proof build that leaves certain avenues open in the future. Integrated wifi would be a nice option to have. I do plan on overclocking in the future as well as going SLI. I also plan to add an SSD. Last night I compiled a build with a ASUS z68 v pro which worked with my budget. $1500 is the max but im trying to keep it at 1300 so I can purchase an audio system to compliment the build.

Ok, basic info. Maybe you know this, maybe not, I'm not trying to talk down to anyone:

PCI Express is the slot your graphics card gets plugged in. PCIe 3.0 is the next gen version of it that offers increased bandwidth, but is still backward compatible with 2.0. The 2.0 cards never came close to saturating the data bus so it's not like suddenly moving to 3.0 will increase performance ( if your freeway is only at half capacity, doubling the amount of driving lanes doesn't suddenly halve your commute time. ) There might be some big development on this front, but unless you're installing PCIe SSD drives in your system, PCIe 3.0 usually won't speed up your rig. It's nice to have "just in case," or if the board only costs a few bucks more, but I wouldn't list it as a must have feature.

As for slot count, if you're not planning on ever adding a third graphics card, you only need two PCIe x16 slots, which most boards have. Regular PCIe slots ( the short ones, ) are used for add on cards like sound or added network cards. Sounds like you don't have any use for these ( perfectly normal. ) And if you only need two slots, you might be able to save a few bucks and get a micro ATX board.

Internal USB 3.0 headers will let you easily hook up faster USB ports on the front/top of your case. Many mid-range boards sport these now and I'd consider them a must. Internal USB 2.0 headers are really only useful if you're planning on hooking up additional USB 2.0 ports somewhere. I'm guessing you don't need/care about these.

Your SATA controllers partially determine how fast your HDD can run ( the rest is dependent on the drive itself. ) In case you don't know, SATA I had a bandwidth limit of 1.5Gb/s, SATA II was 3Gb/s, and SATA III can get to 6Gb/s. I call them SATA 3 and 6 instead of II and III because that's the speed on the bus. I don't think any HDDs can saturate the SATA 3 port and few SSDs saturate SATA 6. Sounds like you only need two SATA 6 ports. Your future SSD can run on it while your current HDD will be fine on a SATA 3 port ( or on the other SATA 6 if you want. )

Integrated Wi-Fi is not a common feature on boards. If this is a must have, it will limit your selection.

Serious overclocking means you want a better voltage regulator module on the board to stabilize the increased power demand from you CPU and GPU. Most enthusiast-geared boards have this for that very reason.

Here are some of my board recommendations: High End
ASRock Extreme4 Gen3 - This is the board I have and it may be a bit overkill for your needs. It has PCIe 3.0, four SATA 6 controllers, internal USB 3.0, eSATA 6, and a good VRM. The back panel does only have four USB 2.0 ports, if that's a problem for you. No Wi-Fi, no Bluetooth.

ASUS P8Z68-V/GEN3 - Comparable to the above ASRock. Only two SATA 6 ports and eSATA 3, but more USB on the back and it has Bluetooth.

Mid-Range:
ASRock Extreme3 Gen3 - The Extreme4's little brother. You lose two SATA 6 ports and the internal USB 3.0 headers.

ASUS P8Z68-V LE - No PCIe 3.0, no eSATA, no Bluetooth.

By no means is this a comprehensive list. Just some models for you to consider, and I'm sure others here will have good suggestion.
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February 29, 2012 10:42:46 PM

RedJaron said:
Ok, basic info. Maybe you know this, maybe not, I'm not trying to talk down to anyone:

PCI Express is the slot your graphics card gets plugged in. PCIe 3.0 is the next gen version of it that offers increased bandwidth, but is still backward compatible with 2.0. The 2.0 cards never came close to saturating the data bus so it's not like suddenly moving to 3.0 will increase performance ( if your freeway is only at half capacity, doubling the amount of driving lanes doesn't suddenly halve your commute time. ) There might be some big development on this front, but unless you're installing PCIe SSD drives in your system, PCIe 3.0 usually won't speed up your rig. It's nice to have "just in case," or if the board only costs a few bucks more, but I wouldn't list it as a must have feature.

As for slot count, if you're not planning on ever adding a third graphics card, you only need two PCIe x16 slots, which most boards have. Regular PCIe slots ( the short ones, ) are used for add on cards like sound or added network cards. Sounds like you don't have any use for these ( perfectly normal. ) And if you only need two slots, you might be able to save a few bucks and get a micro ATX board.

Internal USB 3.0 headers will let you easily hook up faster USB ports on the front/top of your case. Many mid-range boards sport these now and I'd consider them a must. Internal USB 2.0 headers are really only useful if you're planning on hooking up additional USB 2.0 ports somewhere. I'm guessing you don't need/care about these.

Your SATA controllers partially determine how fast your HDD can run ( the rest is dependent on the drive itself. ) In case you don't know, SATA I had a bandwidth limit of 1.5Gb/s, SATA II was 3Gb/s, and SATA III can get to 6Gb/s. I call them SATA 3 and 6 instead of II and III because that's the speed on the bus. I don't think any HDDs can saturate the SATA 3 port and few SSDs saturate SATA 6. Sounds like you only need two SATA 6 ports. Your future SSD can run on it while your current HDD will be fine on a SATA 3 port ( or on the other SATA 6 if you want. )

Integrated Wi-Fi is not a common feature on boards. If this is a must have, it will limit your selection.

Serious overclocking means you want a better voltage regulator module on the board to stabilize the increased power demand from you CPU and GPU. Most enthusiast-geared boards have this for that very reason.

Here are some of my board recommendations: High End
ASRock Extreme4 Gen3 - This is the board I have and it may be a bit overkill for your needs. It has PCIe 3.0, four SATA 6 controllers, internal USB 3.0, eSATA 6, and a good VRM. The back panel does only have four USB 2.0 ports, if that's a problem for you. No Wi-Fi, no Bluetooth.

ASUS P8Z68-V/GEN3 - Comparable to the above ASRock. Only two SATA 6 ports and eSATA 3, but more USB on the back and it has Bluetooth.

Mid-Range:
ASRock Extreme3 Gen3The Extreme4's little brother. You lose two SATA 6 ports and the internal USB 3.0 headers.

ASUS P8Z68-V LENo PCIe 3.0, no eSATA, no Bluetooth.

By no means is this a comprehensive list. Just some models for you to consider, and I'm sure others here will have good suggestion.


Wow, thanks Red. I really appreciate you posting all of this. The z68 v/3gen seems about right for me since I would only use two sata 6/ ports at most and could benefit from extra usb ports/bluetooth.Now that the mobo situation is figured out, any final thoughts on the build? Although the 570 runs hot, im leaving the hyper 212 out of the build to see how the antec and stock cooler perform.
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a b B Homebuilt system
March 1, 2012 12:29:27 AM

I'm partial to Radeons right now as they seem to run quieter and with less power, but that's tomaytoe / tomahto really. And strangely, the 570 / 6970 seem to be the odd ducks out of that trend so I'd probably go nVidia at that price point too.

However, I would recommend an aftermarket cooler. The 212 and Gaia are only $30 and will run much quieter than the stock fan. Other aftermarket cooling in the case shouldn't be necessary at this point. Not until you start OCing.
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