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NVIDEA GTX 570 Strange Stuttering/Lag Issues

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December 30, 2011 2:17:20 AM

I just installed a brand-new graphics card a couple days ago, the NVIDEA GTX 570. I installed the proper drivers, and it seemed to display the video on the screen just fine. I noticed some slight lag, just in general, such as when I'm typing it freezes and then continues. Then, I tried watching a video, and experienced the same issue: It froze in periods during the video, then continued. It would do this every 10 - 15 seconds or so. My computer never had this problem prior to upgrading to the GTX 570 (before the 570 I had the GTS 450).

Next, I started up Starcraft 2. On my GTS 450 I had no problem playing this game at ultra specs. However, when I played it this time with the GTX 570, it had the same stuttering problem plus a lot of lag. It was essentially unplayable. Same issue with Battlefield 3. Even scrolling through web pages has stuttering, as well as typing this.

If anyone has any idea as to what may be the problem, please let me know. Is it a software problem? An issue with my specific card? Thanks!
December 30, 2011 2:34:58 AM

Would those stutterings happen to be at the same time your HDD light is flashing?
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December 30, 2011 2:47:05 AM

Well... All the HDD light means is that the computer is writing to the disk. And the computer is constantly writing to the disk. So my light is constantly flashing. It's impossible to tell if the stuttering and the HDD light have a direct relationship, but I'd go with the assumption that it doesn't.
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a c 175 U Graphics card
December 30, 2011 2:49:48 AM

NVIDEA!!

Make sure you install it correctly and update all drivers...

Good luck :) 
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December 30, 2011 2:53:57 AM

palladin9479 said:
Would those stutterings happen to be at the same time your HDD light is flashing?

Well... All the HDD light means is that the computer is writing to the disk. And the computer is constantly writing to the disk. So my light is constantly flashing. It's impossible to tell if the stuttering and the HDD light have a direct relationship, but I'd go with the assumption that it doesn't.
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December 30, 2011 2:54:40 AM

refillable said:
NVIDEA!!

Make sure you install it correctly and update all drivers...

Good luck :) 

All my drivers are updated. It is, indeed, installed correctly. I built the entire computer, so...
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December 30, 2011 3:04:45 AM

Technology That Lasts said:
Well... All the HDD light means is that the computer is writing to the disk. And the computer is constantly writing to the disk. So my light is constantly flashing. It's impossible to tell if the stuttering and the HDD light have a direct relationship, but I'd go with the assumption that it doesn't.



Umm no. That light means there is disk access, both read and writing. Your computer is NOT "constantly writing" to the disk normally. Constant disk activity is known as disk thrashing and is considered a very bad thing.

The fact that you said it's constantly blinking tells me a few things. One being that you might not have enough memory, or have some memory issues as your system might be paging constantly. Second is that due to constantly reading / writing your programs read / write requests are being queued and having to be delayed. This in turn cause's sudden short term lag spikes, normally seen as stutters.

This is further a problem because disk reads / writes are not random, there is something doing those reads and writes and that something is demanding CPU cycles. Constant reads / writes means something is very very busy in the background.

Nothing in the NVidia drivers does this, I'd start looking towards your anti-virus or system memory settings. How much memory do you have on this system, do you have superfetch turned on and have a multi-tab browser open?
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a c 175 U Graphics card
December 30, 2011 3:13:14 AM

Try defragging HDD?
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December 30, 2011 3:31:37 AM

palladin9479 said:
Umm no. That light means there is disk access, both read and writing. Your computer is NOT "constantly writing" to the disk normally. Constant disk activity is known as disk thrashing and is considered a very bad thing.

The fact that you said it's constantly blinking tells me a few things. One being that you might not have enough memory, or have some memory issues as your system might be paging constantly. Second is that due to constantly reading / writing your programs read / write requests are being queued and having to be delayed. This in turn cause's sudden short term lag spikes, normally seen as stutters.

This is further a problem because disk reads / writes are not random, there is something doing those reads and writes and that something is demanding CPU cycles. Constant reads / writes means something is very very busy in the background.

Nothing in the NVidia drivers does this, I'd start looking towards your anti-virus or system memory settings. How much memory do you have on this system, do you have superfetch turned on and have a multi-tab browser open?

First of all, are you sure we're talking about the same light? The light pretty much flashes consistently on every computer I've ever used.

Second of all, it's definitely not an issue that doesn't pertain to the graphics card. I've never had any of these issues prior to changing the GPU before. I have 6gb of RAM, in a triple-channel configuration. I use MS Security Essentials as it uses the least amount of system resources for my anti-virus program, though I've never had a virus before. I don't have superfetch turned on, and I do have a multi-tab browser open. I'm very big on tabs, in fact I probably have well over 100 open. Possibly 200. I always keep a close eye on this, however, and it's never been a problem in the past. Currently I'm only using 3.64gb of my 6gb. It's not a problem that doesn't pertain to the graphics card.

Thanks for your help.
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December 30, 2011 3:34:40 AM

refillable said:
Try defragging HDD?

The problem doesn't pertain to my hard drive. This wouldn't suddenly happen because I didn't defrag in a while anyway. I do periodically defrag, however, so I seriously doubt it'll do anything. There are no other symptoms of my hard drive needing a defrag either.
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December 30, 2011 5:49:07 AM

Technology That Lasts said:
First of all, are you sure we're talking about the same light? The light pretty much flashes consistently on every computer I've ever used.

Second of all, it's definitely not an issue that doesn't pertain to the graphics card. I've never had any of these issues prior to changing the GPU before. I have 6gb of RAM, in a triple-channel configuration. I use MS Security Essentials as it uses the least amount of system resources for my anti-virus program, though I've never had a virus before. I don't have superfetch turned on, and I do have a multi-tab browser open. I'm very big on tabs, in fact I probably have well over 100 open. Possibly 200. I always keep a close eye on this, however, and it's never been a problem in the past. Currently I'm only using 3.64gb of my 6gb. It's not a problem that doesn't pertain to the graphics card.

Thanks for your help.


People who are experienced and tend to design and engineer their own solutions are attempting to help you, you might want to take a breath and listen.

That HDD light should NEVER be constantly flashing. It should flash only when your loading a program and whenever the program does disk activity. Disk activity after a program is loaded is light, less then 1 second typically. So an occasional flash is fine, but constantly flashing means your HDD is being thrashed, this is incredibly bad.

Now I could do this long drawn out explanation of how disk I/O is done and what DMA does, but ultimately know that while your HDD is being accessed the thread doing the accessing will be stalled waiting on the return of that data. Depending on how many cores your CPU has and how many thread locks the program doing the accessing is using, this could result in the CPU stalling out for a couple of seconds until the disk activity is finished. This is most likely the source of the stuttering your experiencing. I've seen this many times on poorly configured systems running Vista with superfetch enabled. The stuttering was usually the result of excessive paging. This problem has mostly been resolved as of Windows 7 and I rarely see it.

It has absolutely nothing to do with your GPU, your GPU does nothing with the HDD and rarely anything with the CPU. It has it's own memory system and I/O access pathways. A GPU will ~not~ cause your whole system to stutter. The absolute worst is if you have a low grade GPU and are trying to play some sort of HD film using video acceleration. The GPU would then stutter and lag the video, but not the system as a whole. Seeing as your talking about a GTX 570, then there is no way in hell it's responsible for your lag.

I asked several questions and you haven't answered them. First do you have superfetch running? I'm assuming your on Windows 7 x64, is this correct? Under the resource tab for the task manager look at physical memory. I'm concerned about the free section and couldn't care less about the cached or total. Near it there is the paged file section, how big is the paged file. You can look into the resources monitor and see which programs are causing excessive disk I/O, might help you identify what's thrashing the system. Now when the system is lagging, do you have a multi tabbed browser running?
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a b U Graphics card
December 30, 2011 8:01:55 AM

To OP - what is your PSU?
Try to remove all your Nvidia drivers from your system and reinstall the latest drivers.
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December 30, 2011 8:24:16 AM

sweep drivers, re-seat card, make sure your PSU is adequate, make sure everything is hooked up right, if fails. Hope u got a warranty.
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a c 107 U Graphics card
December 30, 2011 8:28:04 AM

what do you have for a PS ? make and model
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December 30, 2011 1:32:05 PM

palladin9479 said:
People who are experienced and tend to design and engineer their own solutions are attempting to help you, you might want to take a breath and listen.

That HDD light should NEVER be constantly flashing. It should flash only when your loading a program and whenever the program does disk activity. Disk activity after a program is loaded is light, less then 1 second typically. So an occasional flash is fine, but constantly flashing means your HDD is being thrashed, this is incredibly bad.

Now I could do this long drawn out explanation of how disk I/O is done and what DMA does, but ultimately know that while your HDD is being accessed the thread doing the accessing will be stalled waiting on the return of that data. Depending on how many cores your CPU has and how many thread locks the program doing the accessing is using, this could result in the CPU stalling out for a couple of seconds until the disk activity is finished. This is most likely the source of the stuttering your experiencing. I've seen this many times on poorly configured systems running Vista with superfetch enabled. The stuttering was usually the result of excessive paging. This problem has mostly been resolved as of Windows 7 and I rarely see it.

It has absolutely nothing to do with your GPU, your GPU does nothing with the HDD and rarely anything with the CPU. It has it's own memory system and I/O access pathways. A GPU will ~not~ cause your whole system to stutter. The absolute worst is if you have a low grade GPU and are trying to play some sort of HD film using video acceleration. The GPU would then stutter and lag the video, but not the system as a whole. Seeing as your talking about a GTX 570, then there is no way in hell it's responsible for your lag.

I asked several questions and you haven't answered them. First do you have superfetch running? I'm assuming your on Windows 7 x64, is this correct? Under the resource tab for the task manager look at physical memory. I'm concerned about the free section and couldn't care less about the cached or total. Near it there is the paged file section, how big is the paged file. You can look into the resources monitor and see which programs are causing excessive disk I/O, might help you identify what's thrashing the system. Now when the system is lagging, do you have a multi tabbed browser running?

Sorry, that wasn't the tone I intended to have.

I think we have a misunderstanding. What I meant by "constantly flashing" is it does, indeed, flash less than a second in about 1 second intervals or so. I've made a quick video to show you (sorry about the bad quality, I purposely had no lighting so you could see the HDD light):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QlGQw9UJla0&feature=yout...

I know that a typical GTX 570 would not cause any lag, so that's why I'm thinking, if it IS a problem with the GPU, it's either:
a) A software problem
or
b) A problem with the specific card

But it could be an entirely different problem, you're right. That's why as soon as I'm done typing this I'll pull out the GTX 570, put my GTS 450 back in, and then see if it still has the issue. I'll inform you then.

As for your questions, I did answer all of them in my paragraph:

"I don't have superfetch turned on, and I do have a multi-tab browser open. I'm very big on tabs, in fact I probably have well over 100 open. Possibly 200..."
"Currently I'm only using 3.64gb of my 6gb."

Upon restarting, I'm now down to just 2.69gb of my 6gb. Plenty of RAM. Physical Memory: 43% used. I can't find the paged file section (see screenshot):



I am running Windows 7 Ultimate N 64x.
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December 30, 2011 2:35:26 PM

I feel like an idiot. Alright, so I went to change out the graphics card like I said I would. I took out the GTX 570 and put in the GTS 450. Everything looked good, so I turned on the computer without closing the case. The motherboard started flashing yellow and red. Then I noticed a pretty major problem: The CPU cooler fan wasn't spinning.

Now, I immediately put two and two together: When I had first turned on the computer after installing the GTX 570 for the first time, I heard a pretty loud clanging noise from the computer, but only once. Then it was quiet, so I didn't think much of it, and just went on with the boot.

This time, however, I knew something had to be stuck in the CPU cooling fan. I tried turning the fan with my finger, and it definitely was caught on something. This had to be the clanging noise I had originally heard a couple days back. I turned off the computer, and after poking around with the fan I noticed that there was a wire stuck in the fan. I removed the wire and turned the fan with my finger. It turned just fine.

What really worried me was what I had done in between the time of installing the GTX 570 initially up until now: I had played 2 games, watched a video, copied files, restarted several times, used a 200-tab browser... I just hope this didn't cause any CPU damage. And I don't think it did, because Intel is smart. A few months ago I watched a YouTube video where someone removed a heat sink from an old AMD CPU while playing a game. It fried. Then, they did the same to a Pentium III Intel CPU, and all that happened was lag. Major lag, as in 1 frame every 2 seconds. This is probably what I was experiencing: To compensate for the lack of cooling, my CPU was simply not doing as much work.

The GTX 570 is back in, and my computer is fine now. Thanks to everyone for helping me, especially palladin9479. You certainly put a considerable amount of effort in trying to help me, and you even took notice that it's probably not a problem with the GPU, which indeed it wasn't. I just feel so dumb that after all that, this was the issue. Again, thanks a lot!
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December 30, 2011 6:52:48 PM

Before you made the announcement that your problem was fixed this is what I was going to say:

I had a similar computer problem, except instead of a computer it was an apple and the problem was that there was a worm it. Long story short the problem was solved by fixing it. So if I were you I would without a doubt, try to fix the computer.

By the way I go to your school, and I can prove it... your a Spartan
So when the break is over ask everybody you know who wrote this message, and I will tell you if it's me.

Your very welcome,

-The computer master
:sol: 
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December 31, 2011 2:13:12 AM

Guess_who_it_is said:
Before you made the announcement that your problem was fixed this is what I was going to say:

I had a similar computer problem, except instead of a computer it was an apple and the problem was that there was a worm it. Long story short the problem was solved by fixing it. So if I were you I would without a doubt, try to fix the computer.

By the way I go to your school, and I can prove it... your a Spartan
So when the break is over ask everybody you know who wrote this message, and I will tell you if it's me.

Your very welcome,

-The computer master
:sol: 

Err... Right, I'll do that.
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December 31, 2011 5:33:23 AM

Technology That Lasts said:
I feel like an idiot. Alright, so I went to change out the graphics card like I said I would. I took out the GTX 570 and put in the GTS 450. Everything looked good, so I turned on the computer without closing the case. The motherboard started flashing yellow and red. Then I noticed a pretty major problem: The CPU cooler fan wasn't spinning.

Now, I immediately put two and two together: When I had first turned on the computer after installing the GTX 570 for the first time, I heard a pretty loud clanging noise from the computer, but only once. Then it was quiet, so I didn't think much of it, and just went on with the boot.

This time, however, I knew something had to be stuck in the CPU cooling fan. I tried turning the fan with my finger, and it definitely was caught on something. This had to be the clanging noise I had originally heard a couple days back. I turned off the computer, and after poking around with the fan I noticed that there was a wire stuck in the fan. I removed the wire and turned the fan with my finger. It turned just fine.

What really worried me was what I had done in between the time of installing the GTX 570 initially up until now: I had played 2 games, watched a video, copied files, restarted several times, used a 200-tab browser... I just hope this didn't cause any CPU damage. And I don't think it did, because Intel is smart. A few months ago I watched a YouTube video where someone removed a heat sink from an old AMD CPU while playing a game. It fried. Then, they did the same to a Pentium III Intel CPU, and all that happened was lag. Major lag, as in 1 frame every 2 seconds. This is probably what I was experiencing: To compensate for the lack of cooling, my CPU was simply not doing as much work.

The GTX 570 is back in, and my computer is fine now. Thanks to everyone for helping me, especially palladin9479. You certainly put a considerable amount of effort in trying to help me, and you even took notice that it's probably not a problem with the GPU, which indeed it wasn't. I just feel so dumb that after all that, this was the issue. Again, thanks a lot!


That makes a lot of sense, the CPU was deliberately throttling itself due to heat issues. Even though you didn't have a spinning fan you did have a heatsink on it, and there are other fans in your case pushing air through, that's why the computer didn't just shut down.

I was beginning to think you had someone attracted a nasty program that was doing nasty things in the background. It's good to hear that the problem was something as simple as a stuck fan, easy to fix and no permanent damage.
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December 31, 2011 12:11:31 PM

palladin9479 said:
That makes a lot of sense, the CPU was deliberately throttling itself due to heat issues. Even though you didn't have a spinning fan you did have a heatsink on it, and there are other fans in your case pushing air through, that's why the computer didn't just shut down.

I was beginning to think you had someone attracted a nasty program that was doing nasty things in the background. It's good to hear that the problem was something as simple as a stuck fan, easy to fix and no permanent damage.

Indeed. Thanks for your help!
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January 7, 2012 1:10:43 AM

Best answer selected by Technology That Lasts.
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