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Power supply died and then backup one too

Last response: in Components
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June 17, 2012 1:41:01 AM

So here's the deal: my uncle has a working PC and a bad PC. The bad PC won't turn on. So I took the working PC's PSU and put it in the bad PC but it still won't work. When I put the "good" PSU back into the working PC, it won't turn on, AGAIN.



Yes, I've checked every connection. I even took the "good" PSU and put it back into my own PC back home (he doesn't live with me), and it won't turn on. (If you're wondering, when I put my own PSU back it turned on)



So now I have 2 PSUs I know are dead. What's the cause? Bad power strip? Bad power supply cable? I'm ready to purchase two new PSUs and a power strip but I want to make sure it's the right thing to do.
a c 694 ) Power supply
June 17, 2012 1:47:40 AM

What could have caused it is a bad short in the bad PC! If the PSU's are generic none quality units with out proper protection it can happen.
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June 17, 2012 2:11:42 AM

A bad short? So what component is the culprit here? I don't want my new PSU to be destroyed as well.
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a c 694 ) Power supply
June 17, 2012 2:17:25 AM

kaitanuva said:
A bad short? So what component is the culprit here? I don't want my new PSU to be destroyed as well.

Hard to say I would disassemble the PC and inspect all components before hooking up to it, look for any thing blown, bulging or burnt.
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June 17, 2012 2:26:11 AM

rolli59 said:
Hard to say I would disassemble the PC and inspect all components before hooking up to it, look for any thing blown, bulging or burnt.


Can bad power strips and PSU cables short the PSU? I'm thinking of replacing those first.

If not, can bad mobo's short the PSU? Testing the mobo if it really works would be a problem..
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a c 694 ) Power supply
June 17, 2012 12:57:41 PM

Bad power strip or cable and you would blow a fuse. Bad motherboard can but usually there would be something visible on the board that it is not alright blown capacitor or something like that.
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June 17, 2012 1:08:40 PM


i will be honest with you, unless you know what you are doing you will blow another psu, take the whole pc without the hdd to a computer repair shop and get them to have a look at it.

there are too many variables that it could be, get a proper shop to look at it, there insurance will cover any of there own parts they break

will cost you less than a new psu. most charge £10/$20 an hour or so



visually inspect all the parts first


if something in it has blown two psu then its likely other parts will be destroyed as well


personally i would have removed everything except motherboard and cpu

then leave it for a few mins. if it is still running i would shut it down and know thoes parts are not the problem




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June 17, 2012 3:45:06 PM

shanky887614 said:
i will be honest with you, unless you know what you are doing you will blow another psu, take the whole pc without the hdd to a computer repair shop and get them to have a look at it.

there are too many variables that it could be, get a proper shop to look at it, there insurance will cover any of there own parts they break

will cost you less than a new psu. most charge £10/$20 an hour or so



visually inspect all the parts first


if something in it has blown two psu then its likely other parts will be destroyed as well


personally i would have removed everything except motherboard and cpu

then leave it for a few mins. if it is still running i would shut it down and know thoes parts are not the problem


Do you think the motherboard and/or CPU are the parts with the highest probability of being the ones who shorted the PSUs? Because when I reconnected the bad computer's parts to the PSU, I didn't bother to connect it to the CD drive. So that leaves the motherboard and/or CPU and/or HDD as the only parts the PSU was hooked up to.

I know I'm going to replace the power strip and cables so that would only leave those parts to watch out for.
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