Need Advice On A Budget Video Editing PC

Approximate Purchase Date: Soon would be nice. I’ve been researching since January.

Budget Range: $1000 - $1200

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Movie/Music editing, HD TV/Movie Watching, Gaming, and Surfing the Web

Parts Not Required: Mouse, Keyboard and Speakers are not needed. If budget allows I would like to purchase a 1080p monitor (19” at the most). I will need an operating system; I’ve been told to get Windows 7 64-bit Professional. I personally still can’t see why I need professional as they make a Home 64-bit.

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: I used Pricewatcher.com to get quotes and Supperbiiz.com seems to pop as the lowest priced. I’ve used NewEgg.com for referencing deals and general rating.
Country: United States

Parts Preferences: The only company that I think is the preferred is Intel and that’s only because I’m going with the i7 2600K.

Overclocking: When I first started researching my new build overclocking wasn’t even in the equation, but as I’ve been reading I’ve discovered that the new Intel line is easier to overclock; so overclocking seems like a very definite plan. Please feel free to knock me down a notch and tell me if I’m in over my head.

SLI or Crossfire: This I’m still not sure about. As I understand for video editing, it is ideal to go with just one good card.

Monitor Resolution: My primary resolution size will be 1920x1080 on a 42” Toshiba Regza TV HDMI connection. If my budget can afford I’d like to get a small (19” at the most) 1080p monitor.

Additional Comments: Here are my current specs

Case: Cooler Master Elite 430 RC-430-KWN1 No PS ATX Mid Tower Case
http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?name=CA-430KWN1

CPU: Intel Core i7 Processor i7-2600K 3.4GHz 8MB LGA1155
http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?name=I7-2600KBX

Motherboard: Asus P8Z68-V/GEN3 Intel Z68 LGA1155
http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?name=MB-PZ68VG3

Video Card: EVGA Nvidia GeForce GTX560 1GB DDR5
http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?name=EV-560_1G

CPU FAN: Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus RR-B10-212P-G1 120mm
http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?name=FAN-B10212

Power Supply: Cooler Master Silent Pro M RS850-AMBAJ3-US 850W
http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?name=PS-RS850US

Memory: Kingston KHX1600C9D3K 8G DDR3-1600 (2x4GB)
http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?name=D31600_8GK

Hard Drive: Western Digital Caviar Blue WD5000AAKX 500G SATA3 7200rpm 16MB
http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?name=HD-W50AAKX

Optical Drive: Lite-On IHAS224-06 LightScribe 24X SATA DVD+/- RW Dual Layer Drive
http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?name=IHAS224-06

Wireless Card: Linksys WMP600N Wireless-N Dual-Band PCI Adapter
http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?name=LS-WMP600N

Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Professional 64-bit
http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?name=MSFQC04649


Some details

Case: The reason I choose it was because I saw it at CompUSA and to me it seemed perfect ; not too big, clean and only one LED (which I’ll probably try to find a way to turn off), but this is my first custom build so I don’t know if it will fit all my components. Please let me know if this case is too small for my current build.

CPU: My current reasoning for going with the 2600K (8M Cache) vs. the 2500K (6M Cache) was because the 26000K has 2 Ms of extra cache. I’ve read for gaming that the 2M of extra cache isn’t worth the money but for video editing I've read that CPU strength is need just as much as a good video card, so the 2Ms would reason out to help (no solid answers on this that I’ve seen). As for the “K”, I’ve decided that in the future (and more likely as soon as I get the comp) I will overclock (read further in Mobo and PSU section).

Motherboard: This is a 2 parted issue. I originally started wanting to get a Z68 board but as I read more it seemed that I really don’t need the new features of the Z68, since I’ll have a video card and SSD feature doesn’t interest me (I plan on getting one later on). I know that the P67 can overclock so it would seem that the P67 would suit just fine. However, I’ve read that the Z68 overclocks better because it gives you more control on what you can overclock (something about the P67 only being able to overclock the multiplier or something like that).
The second part of the issue is; what feature do I really need on the motherboard? I really have no idea what is needed on a motherboard besides video card connection/s hard drive connection/s and some firewire and/or esata. For Z68 I choose the V/Gen3 because it seemed like it had the basics and some of the future stuff like the PCI 3.o and USB 3.0. For a P67 I looked at an Asrock Extreme 4 ( http://www.asrock.com/mb/compare.asp?SelectedModel=P67+Extreme4+Gen3&SelectedModel=P67+Extreme4 ). Is the V/Gen or the Extreme4 still too loaded for me? As for companies I’m open to suggestions. Also, I read that motherboards that have a PCIe 3.0 they will support Ivy Bridge, is this true?

Video Card: I wanted to go with a Nvidia Quadro 4000 but that’s out of my price range. The GeForce 570 and 580 (on paper) are equivalent to the 4000, however they’re also out of my price range, so I went one step down and got the GTX560 (not the Ti). Not sure how the Radeon cards stack up. If I can go down on price on some of my other components I might be able to get the 570, but I think I’m pretty low on most of my stuff.

CPU Fan: I don’t remember how I came about this selection but it seemed well priced and rated well. I’m open to other suggestions, size, company etc. I’m planning to overclock so I’m assuming that I needed a CPU fan. Also, do I need more case fans?

Power Supply: Ok I’m really not sure if this is enough or over kill. When I went to custom computer build sites like CyberPowerPC and iBuyPower, they show that 650 watts would be enough for a GTX560 but if I went with a GTX570 it shows I need 700 watts and the GTX580 needs 800 watts. I’m pretty sure that I will upgrade my GPU in the future plus I’ll be overclocking (I think I’ll OC around 4.0-4.5Ghz, I hear that’s a stable amount). I also have 4 hard drives powered by USB (not sure if that will affects power usage a lot).

I don’t know what other information to add about the build; if you can think of anything else feel free to ask. Hope you guys can help.
15 answers Last reply
More about need advice budget video editing
  1. Quote:
    Power Supply: Ok I’m really not sure if this is enough or over kill. When I went to custom computer build sites like CyberPowerPC and iBuyPower, they show that 650 watts would be enough for a GTX560 but if I went with a GTX570 it shows I need 700 watts and the GTX580 needs 800 watts. I’m pretty sure that I will upgrade my GPU in the future plus I’ll be overclocking (I think I’ll OC around 4.0-4.5Ghz, I hear that’s a stable amount). I also have 4 hard drives powered by USB (not sure if that will affects power usage a lot).


    The CM Silent Pro series is not the best choice - I know other sites rank them highly but I've read nothing but complaints about them. Go with a Corsair TX650 or a Seasonic S12 620 to be on the safe side.

    - Corsair TX650: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139020
    - Seasonic S12 II 620W: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817151096

    I do not trust what Cyberpower or iBUYPOWER recommends - I take them with a grain of salt, I'd highly recommend reading this about choosing a good PSU: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/power-supply-psu-review,2916.html

    Quote:
    CPU Fan: I don’t remember how I came about this selection but it seemed well priced and rated well. I’m open to other suggestions, size, company etc. I’m planning to overclock so I’m assuming that I needed a CPU fan. Also, do I need more case fans?


    The Hyper 212 is an excellent choice - if you want alternate suggestions - there's some good ones listed in this article: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/LGA-2011-i7-3960X-Air-Overclocking,3130.html

    Quote:
    Case: The reason I choose it was because I saw it at CompUSA and to me it seemed perfect ; not too big, clean and only one LED (which I’ll probably try to find a way to turn off), but this is my first custom build so I don’t know if it will fit all my components. Please let me know if this case is too small for my current build.


    It might be a bit small but it definitely lacks cable management. I personally think the HAF 912 would be a better choice but I'd say invest a little bit more and go for something like the Corsair Carbide: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811139008

    Quote:
    Video Card: I wanted to go with a Nvidia Quadro 4000 but that’s out of my price range. The GeForce 570 and 580 (on paper) are equivalent to the 4000, however they’re also out of my price range, so I went one step down and got the GTX560 (not the Ti). Not sure how the Radeon cards stack up. If I can go down on price on some of my other components I might be able to get the 570, but I think I’m pretty low on most of my stuff.


    The Quaddros are good but they are incredibly expensive compared to a Fire Pro. The 560TI you have is a good choice and it should be fine for the most part.

    Quote:
    Motherboard: This is a 2 parted issue. I originally started wanting to get a Z68 board but as I read more it seemed that I really don’t need the new features of the Z68, since I’ll have a video card and SSD feature doesn’t interest me (I plan on getting one later on). I know that the P67 can overclock so it would seem that the P67 would suit just fine. However, I’ve read that the Z68 overclocks better because it gives you more control on what you can overclock (something about the P67 only being able to overclock the multiplier or something like that).


    Not necessarily - Z68 and P67 overclock about the same - anyone who tells you one overclocks better than the other most likely doesn't know what they're talking about.

    If you plan on getting an SSD it'd be wise to research how your drive will stack with Intel's smart SSD caching feature which will move files through quickly - great for video editing and After Effects.

    Quote:
    The second part of the issue is; what feature do I really need on the motherboard? I really have no idea what is needed on a motherboard besides video card connection/s hard drive connection/s and some firewire and/or esata. For Z68 I choose the V/Gen3 because it seemed like it had the basics and some of the future stuff like the PCI 3.o and USB 3.0. For a P67 I looked at an Asrock Extreme 4 ( http://www.asrock.com/mb/compare.a [...] 7+Extreme4 ). Is the V/Gen or the Extreme4 still too loaded for me? As for companies I’m open to suggestions. Also, I read that motherboards that have a PCIe 3.0 they will support Ivy Bridge, is this true?


    The Asus would certainly be a better choice than the Asrock would - I personally build my builds with future expansion in mind so I try to pick the motherboard that will best suit those needs. I do not recommend going micro ATX (GENE-Z) on a full desktop system for those very reasons. As for what you need that depends on how many HDs and optical drives you ultimately plan to run, and how many video card(s) you ultimately plan to run. Z68 will also have an upgrade path to Intel's upcoming Ivy Bridge CPUs.

    One thing you should watch for is the RAM voltage - I noticed you picked 1.65V RAM - that will not mix well with Sandy Bridge - here's the same thing in a 1.5V configuration: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820104264

    Quote:
    CPU: My current reasoning for going with the 2600K (8M Cache) vs. the 2500K (6M Cache) was because the 26000K has 2 Ms of extra cache. I’ve read for gaming that the 2M of extra cache isn’t worth the money but for video editing I've read that CPU strength is need just as much as a good video card, so the 2Ms would reason out to help (no solid answers on this that I’ve seen). As for the “K”, I’ve decided that in the future (and more likely as soon as I get the comp) I will overclock (read further in Mobo and PSU section).


    If you're running anything that uses hyper-threading (CS5, After Effects, any 3-D editing and rendering programs), the 2600K is definitely the logical choice over the 2500K.

    Quote:
    Parts Not Required: Mouse, Keyboard and Speakers are not needed. If budget allows I would like to purchase a 1080p monitor (19” at the most). I will need an operating system; I’ve been told to get Windows 7 64-bit Professional. I personally still can’t see why I need professional as they make a Home 64-bit.


    The reason why you'd want 7 Pro over Home Premium is due to Home Premium's RAM limitations. HP can only address up to ~16GB of RAM where 7 Pro does away with that and has a nearly unlimited RAM allotment. You could also use Ultimate but that's only if you plan to use any of the language packs. You most likely won't use all 16GB but if you're running After Effects you will need all the RAM you can get.
  2. Sorry for taking such a long time to reply.

    Quote:
    Go with a Corsair TX650 or a Seasonic S12 620 to be on the safe side.
    - Corsair TX650: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139020
    - Seasonic S12 II 620W: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817151096

    I see you are recommending in the 600 watt range, will that be enough watts? Also I was hoping to stay with modular cables, for better cable management.

    Quote:
    It might be a bit small but it definitely lacks cable management.

    The sentence doesn't make sense to me; are you telling me the case is too small "and" it definitely lacks cable management; or the case is too small but it definitely "doesn't" lack cable management? I just want to make sure I'm not misreading information.

    Quote:
    I personally think the HAF 912 would be a better choice but I'd say invest a little bit more and go for something like the Corsair Carbide: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Prod [...] 6811139008

    I like the Corsair Carbide but I'm trying to keep cost low, any particular reason why I should go with that case or why that case is better than the HAF 912? I do see that the cases are bigger, however, my plan was to go with a modular power supply so that way it I could stay with a slightly smaller case. Is this a bad idea?

    Quote:
    The 560TI you have is a good choice and it should be fine for the most part.

    I didn't choose a 560 Ti, I chose a non Ti. Are there more benefits with going with a Ti?

    Quote:
    Not necessarily - Z68 and P67 overclock about the same - anyone who tells you one overclocks better than the other most likely doesn't know what they're talking about.

    I've been reading up more on this and it seems that its more to do with the motherboard features.

    Quote:
    Z68 will also have an upgrade path to Intel's upcoming Ivy Bridge CPUs.

    So the P67 are not going to be Ivy Bride compatible?

    Quote:
    One thing you should watch for is the RAM voltage - I noticed you picked 1.65V RAM - that will not mix well with Sandy Bridge - here's the same thing in a 1.5V configuration: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820104264

    Thanks I didn't know about this. What about this CORSAIR Vengeance Model CMZ8GX3M2A1600C9 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820233144

    Quote:
    The reason why you'd want 7 Pro over Home Premium is due to Home Premium's RAM limitations. HP can only address up to ~16GB of RAM where 7 Pro does away with that and has a nearly unlimited RAM allotment.

    Thank you for a clear cut answer; looks like something that I will be needing.
  3. Quote:
    I see you are recommending in the 600 watt range, will that be enough watts? Also I was hoping to stay with modular cables, for better cable management.


    Should be plenty for a 560TI - if you want to get a ~700W model I'd recommend this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139021

    Having a modular PSU will not mean that cable management is clean - that's a myth. It's all in how you route your cables that will be better for cable management, see below.

    Quote:
    The sentence doesn't make sense to me; are you telling me the case is too small "and" it definitely lacks cable management; or the case is too small but it definitely "doesn't" lack cable management? I just want to make sure I'm not misreading information.


    The cable management feature includes a CPU retention hole - making it easier to install aftermarket coolers - and cable management means the ability to route PSU and power cables behind the motherboard to save space and improve the way your system's air flow functions.

    Quote:
    I didn't choose a 560 Ti, I chose a non Ti. Are there more benefits with going with a Ti?


    For the most part the 560 you chose is a reference design. The 560TIs like the one from EVGA and Asus are based on the manufacturer's own designs and are usually factory overclocked to support higher speeds - you will definitely notice the difference on a video production system.

    Quote:
    I like the Corsair Carbide but I'm trying to keep cost low, any particular reason why I should go with that case or why that case is better than the HAF 912? I do see that the cases are bigger, however, my plan was to go with a modular power supply so that way it I could stay with a slightly smaller case. Is this a bad idea?


    The HAF 912 is a performance enthusiast case and it includes tons of extras that are not found anywhere in the price range - and I've used cases from a lot of different manufacturers including CM, Antec, to crap brands like Apevia and Raidmax, and the HAF 912 is one of the best I've ever used. The Corsair is a good choice too but if you want to keep costs low go with the HAF 912.

    Quote:
    I've been reading up more on this and it seems that its more to do with the motherboard features.


    Yes that's correct - it's all about what features your motherboard manufacturer will provide than anything else.

    Quote:
    So the P67 are not going to be Ivy Bride compatible?


    Any motherboard that has socket LGA 1155 will support Ivy Bridge - that includes H67 and H61, the Z68 has more features than P67 does like smart HD/SSD caching and 3TB hard drive support.

    Quote:
    Thanks I didn't know about this. What about this CORSAIR Vengeance Model CMZ8GX3M2A1600C9 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Prod [...] 6820233144


    That's a decent choice but the tall heat sinks will not be good for installing aftermarket coolers as they will interfere with your cooler's PWM fan. Go low profile - Corsair is a good choice but Kingston and Crucial have significantly lower fail rates. The top-tier RAM manufacturers are usually Crucial, Corsair, Kingston Hyper X, G.Skill, Mushkin, and PNY.

    Try this instead: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820148544
  4. Here is an updated list of my spec list

    First Half From SuperBiiz.com:

    Intel Core i7 Processor i7-2600K 3.4GHz 8MB LGA1155 CPU - $306.99

    http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?p=I7-2600KBX&c=pw&hash=e576ts5tmU10NKTV9WdL1HR7ERzfOSTu7LO0RHvGulyACfrh7mUemUcXuwTDgeQPnkQmUV5FpVNhuzM0ORrzlTFZfXquOLlpCxqdNKxxyGCxML%2FUKSzd2RqaQuzU

    ZOTAC nVidia GeForce GTX560 1GB DDR5 - $175.99

    http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?p=ZT-G560_1G&c=pw&hash=8354R6CbOPk7DgAREdyQcdgJO7w1zSn7iifhcbywqbkEwGjTFCaQZooWf628gzhawqXjiHAUCWZgiVFdJFi0n2fugNOeXcc54kjootdnQ90aTDaEFZdSCBmR%2FaZJ

    Western Digital Caviar Blue 500G SATA3 7200rpm 16MB HDD - $82.99

    http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?p=HD-W50AAKX&c=pw&hash=c2e0LOT6uWfVm0Iid84k2XfZKhwscfbahIBokYFyFMKKb89D6v4v4mjMH4K7mpFu6DrebwNMdnIgVGslL5bM14EQIIdRmmJPTNGPBCeZrN7Mc1OD0SY3B5bG

    Linksys WMP600N Wireless-N Dual-Band PCI Adapter - $54.99

    http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?p=LS-WMP600N&c=pw&hash=421fvFiwFJRCg7G46jPbgEYBi9%2BJRT37LdurTnCaALM0GVuwzaZ82QglJqpJuZ3cuHU5xdEZioAfMBv%2BlbQBtWyCAIzsUHhO8coRYc7rfF68T2npWrbezsemmkg

    Cooler Master HAF 912 No PS ATX Mid Tower Gaming Case - $53.49

    http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?p=CA-912KKN1&c=pw&hash=5bd3lbs1CFaKCNlPwGnRWqj33Q0c0WL31Gutdui5%2F03pZKhlpmMn3QKlLhaGep4gwBwxLINENviMekFQRyDm55GO6Wo7aC6MNVaVHO%2FwyxuKz1PfoEN2bbbm

    Asus P8Z68-V/GEN3 LGA1155/ Intel Z68 ATX Motherboard - $176.99

    http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?p=MB-PZ68VG3&c=pw&hash=74a5g%2FU15C%2B%2BAm9u5OlfS1R%2BaeXYLDe6p0cEV0vP8QUgojb4fU7%2BcLrJ%2FOj5V5dB2wWv9c6Vqo69%2F9CWCfqmPna33jL%2BlPyX3fKG5264JLYR8aSeFPH2qac41Q

    Lite-On IHAS224-06 LightScribe 24X DVD+/-RW Dual Layer Drive - $20.99

    http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?p=IHAS224-06&c=pw&hash=251egbTuaSzvpTzAHiQB%2FPeRRJnHGkAygQBBVefi5M1KUUQpERZXS9C7fF9KemLiVRFLLZiOBmZubxNKOxeGH6%2Fbm6wzFkv%2FQJF09S0Xnjza1h0UB5fbr4DD

    Superbiiz.com $872.43 + $29.73 Shipping = $902.16


    Second Half From NewEgg.com:

    CORSAIR Enthusiast Series TX750 V2 750W PSU - $104.99

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139021

    Crucial Ballistix Sport 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 1600 Memory $44.99

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820148544

    Microsoft Windows 7 Professional SP1 64-bit - OEM - $139.99

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16832116992

    COOLER MASTER Hyper 212 EVO CPU Cooler - $34.99

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835103099

    Newegg.com $324.96 + $6.77 Shipping = $331.73

    Grand Total = 1233.89

    Now, normally I wouldn't freak being $30 over my budget, however I've yet to factor in the build/installation of my computer.

    Is there a cheaper place to buy components? Should I choose a different brand for a product? I suppose if I really have to, is there a product that I can possibly downgrade? I did change from EVGA to ZOTAC, it seemed rated pretty well. I'm open to suggestions.
  5. the 560ti has more processor cores than the 560 non-ti. which is almost the same as a 460 with a higher stock clock.
    big difference between the two
  6. SoundSurj said:

    Is there a cheaper place to by components? Should I choose a different brand for a product? I suppose if I really have to, is there a product that I can possibly downgrade? I did change from EVGA to ZOTAC, it seemed rated pretty well. I'm open to suggestions.


    No - Zotac is not highly rated - stick with EVGA, you get a 10 year warranty and their optional step up plan which means that you'll be able to swap your card for the Keppler equivalent when it's out.
  7. So going with a non Ti is not a good idea?
    Quote:
    I noticed you picked 1.65V RAM - that will not mix well with Sandy Bridge
    What do you mean by "will not mix well"?
  8. SoundSurj said:
    So going with a non Ti is not a good idea?
    Quote:
    I noticed you picked 1.65V RAM - that will not mix well with Sandy Bridge
    What do you mean by "will not mix well"?

    going with a non Ti is not a bad idea, but the 560 ti is quite a bit more powerful and just a little more expensive
    with sandy bridge you only really want to have 1.5v ram, 1.65v will often cause issues
  9. SoundSurj said:
    So going with a non Ti is not a good idea?
    Quote:
    I noticed you picked 1.65V RAM - that will not mix well with Sandy Bridge
    What do you mean by "will not mix well"?


    1.65V will cause issues with the BIOS and your motherboard - it's best to stick with a 1.5V setup like this:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820148544

    Sandy Bridge has a lot of issues with RAM due to the core design of the chip having the memory controller on it instead of integrated into the motherboard's chipset - you need 1.5V although I've seen people get away with 1.6V and be fine, but 1.65V or 1.25 / 1.35V will cause lots of issues with the RAM controller.
  10. OK so I'm seeing that there are Superclocked and Over Clocked (I'm assuming same difference) but how different is it from Ti?

    EVGA nVidia GeForce GTX560 Superclocked
    http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?name=EV-560G1OC

    Asus nVidia GeForce GTX560
    http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?name=AS-GTX56DC#

    Asus nVidia GeForce GTX560
    http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?name=AS-G560DT5#

    GIGABYTE nVidia GeForce GTX560 SOC
    http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?name=GA-N560SOC#


    EVGA nVidia GeForce GTX560 Ti
    http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?name=EV-GTX560
  11. SoundSurj said:
    OK so I'm seeing that there are Superclocked and Over Clocked (I'm assuming same difference) but how different is it from Ti?

    EVGA nVidia GeForce GTX560 Superclocked
    http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?name=EV-560G1OC

    Asus nVidia GeForce GTX560
    http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?name=AS-GTX56DC#

    Asus nVidia GeForce GTX560
    http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?name=AS-G560DT5#

    GIGABYTE nVidia GeForce GTX560 SOC
    http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?name=GA-N560SOC#


    EVGA nVidia GeForce GTX560 Ti
    http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?name=EV-GTX560


    I'd go with the last one in that list personally. There's not a whole lot of difference between super clocked and overclocked GPUs, it's more based on the design the manufacturers use than anything/
  12. Any one know anything about the Windows 7 64-bit (Branded)? It's way cheaper then the regular ones. Would this be okay to buy?
    http://www.esuperdeal.com/cgi-bin/ait-detail.asp?product_no=1946&menu_no=11
  13. Here is an updated spec list of what I would like to get. Do all these things look pretty compatible with each other?

    Case: Cooler Master HAF 912 Mid Tower Case http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003ZM7YTA/ref=ox_sc_act_title_5?ie=UTF8&m=A3LJ5WMKNRFKQS

    Motherboard: ASUS P8Z68-V/GEN3
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005UDITT6/ref=ox_sc_act_title_4?ie=UTF8&m=A29UNH1ZA819PW

    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO CPU Cooler
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005O65JXI/ref=ox_sc_act_title_2?ie=UTF8&m=A3LJ5WMKNRFKQS

    Hard Drive: Western Digital Caviar Blue 500 GB Hard Drive
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00461G3MS/ref=ox_sc_act_title_3?ie=UTF8&m=A23NVCSO4PYH3S

    Wireless Card: Linksys Wireless-N PCI Adapter (WMP600N)
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0028N6VN2/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?ie=UTF8&m=ATVPDKIKX0DER

    CPU: Intel Core i7 Processor i7-2600K 3.4GHz
    http://www.portatech.com/catalog/viewitem.asp?ID=71210&r=p

    Optical Drive: LITE-ON DVD Writer
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827106333

    GPU: EVGA GeForce GTX 560 Ti 448 Cores
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130738

    PSU: Cosair Enthusiast Series TX750
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139021

    RAM: Crucial Ballistix sport 8GB (2 x 4GB)
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820148544

    OS: Microsoft Windows 7 Professional 64 bit Full Version OEM
    http://www.bmem.net/microsoftwindows7professional64bitfullversionoemdell.aspx
  14. g-unit1111 said:
    Quote:
    Power Supply: Ok I’m really not sure if this is enough or over kill. When I went to custom computer build sites like CyberPowerPC and iBuyPower, they show that 650 watts would be enough for a GTX560 but if I went with a GTX570 it shows I need 700 watts and the GTX580 needs 800 watts. I’m pretty sure that I will upgrade my GPU in the future plus I’ll be overclocking (I think I’ll OC around 4.0-4.5Ghz, I hear that’s a stable amount). I also have 4 hard drives powered by USB (not sure if that will affects power usage a lot).


    The CM Silent Pro series is not the best choice - I know other sites rank them highly but I've read nothing but complaints about them. Go with a Corsair TX650 or a Seasonic S12 620 to be on the safe side.

    - Corsair TX650: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139020
    - Seasonic S12 II 620W: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817151096

    I do not trust what Cyberpower or iBUYPOWER recommends - I take them with a grain of salt, I'd highly recommend reading this about choosing a good PSU: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/power-supply-psu-review,2916.html

    Quote:
    CPU Fan: I don’t remember how I came about this selection but it seemed well priced and rated well. I’m open to other suggestions, size, company etc. I’m planning to overclock so I’m assuming that I needed a CPU fan. Also, do I need more case fans?


    The Hyper 212 is an excellent choice - if you want alternate suggestions - there's some good ones listed in this article: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/LGA-2011-i7-3960X-Air-Overclocking,3130.html

    Quote:
    Case: The reason I choose it was because I saw it at CompUSA and to me it seemed perfect ; not too big, clean and only one LED (which I’ll probably try to find a way to turn off), but this is my first custom build so I don’t know if it will fit all my components. Please let me know if this case is too small for my current build.


    It might be a bit small but it definitely lacks cable management. I personally think the HAF 912 would be a better choice but I'd say invest a little bit more and go for something like the Corsair Carbide: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811139008

    Quote:
    Video Card: I wanted to go with a Nvidia Quadro 4000 but that’s out of my price range. The GeForce 570 and 580 (on paper) are equivalent to the 4000, however they’re also out of my price range, so I went one step down and got the GTX560 (not the Ti). Not sure how the Radeon cards stack up. If I can go down on price on some of my other components I might be able to get the 570, but I think I’m pretty low on most of my stuff.


    The Quaddros are good but they are incredibly expensive compared to a Fire Pro. The 560TI you have is a good choice and it should be fine for the most part.

    Quote:
    Motherboard: This is a 2 parted issue. I originally started wanting to get a Z68 board but as I read more it seemed that I really don’t need the new features of the Z68, since I’ll have a video card and SSD feature doesn’t interest me (I plan on getting one later on). I know that the P67 can overclock so it would seem that the P67 would suit just fine. However, I’ve read that the Z68 overclocks better because it gives you more control on what you can overclock (something about the P67 only being able to overclock the multiplier or something like that).


    Not necessarily - Z68 and P67 overclock about the same - anyone who tells you one overclocks better than the other most likely doesn't know what they're talking about.

    If you plan on getting an SSD it'd be wise to research how your drive will stack with Intel's smart SSD caching feature which will move files through quickly - great for video editing and After Effects.

    Quote:
    The second part of the issue is; what feature do I really need on the motherboard? I really have no idea what is needed on a motherboard besides video card connection/s hard drive connection/s and some firewire and/or esata. For Z68 I choose the V/Gen3 because it seemed like it had the basics and some of the future stuff like the PCI 3.o and USB 3.0. For a P67 I looked at an Asrock Extreme 4 ( http://www.asrock.com/mb/compare.a [...] 7+Extreme4 ). Is the V/Gen or the Extreme4 still too loaded for me? As for companies I’m open to suggestions. Also, I read that motherboards that have a PCIe 3.0 they will support Ivy Bridge, is this true?


    The Asus would certainly be a better choice than the Asrock would - I personally build my builds with future expansion in mind so I try to pick the motherboard that will best suit those needs. I do not recommend going micro ATX (GENE-Z) on a full desktop system for those very reasons. As for what you need that depends on how many HDs and optical drives you ultimately plan to run, and how many video card(s) you ultimately plan to run. Z68 will also have an upgrade path to Intel's upcoming Ivy Bridge CPUs.

    One thing you should watch for is the RAM voltage - I noticed you picked 1.65V RAM - that will not mix well with Sandy Bridge - here's the same thing in a 1.5V configuration: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820104264

    Quote:
    CPU: My current reasoning for going with the 2600K (8M Cache) vs. the 2500K (6M Cache) was because the 26000K has 2 Ms of extra cache. I’ve read for gaming that the 2M of extra cache isn’t worth the money but for video editing I've read that CPU strength is need just as much as a good video card, so the 2Ms would reason out to help (no solid answers on this that I’ve seen). As for the “K”, I’ve decided that in the future (and more likely as soon as I get the comp) I will overclock (read further in Mobo and PSU section).


    If you're running anything that uses hyper-threading (CS5, After Effects, any 3-D editing and rendering programs), the 2600K is definitely the logical choice over the 2500K.

    Quote:
    Parts Not Required: Mouse, Keyboard and Speakers are not needed. If budget allows I would like to purchase a 1080p monitor (19” at the most). I will need an operating system; I’ve been told to get Windows 7 64-bit Professional. I personally still can’t see why I need professional as they make a Home 64-bit.


    The reason why you'd want 7 Pro over Home Premium is due to Home Premium's RAM limitations. HP can only address up to ~16GB of RAM where 7 Pro does away with that and has a nearly unlimited RAM allotment. You could also use Ultimate but that's only if you plan to use any of the language packs. You most likely won't use all 16GB but if you're running After Effects you will need all the RAM you can get.


    g-unit1111 said:
    Quote:
    I see you are recommending in the 600 watt range, will that be enough watts? Also I was hoping to stay with modular cables, for better cable management.


    Should be plenty for a 560TI - if you want to get a ~700W model I'd recommend this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139021

    Having a modular PSU will not mean that cable management is clean - that's a myth. It's all in how you route your cables that will be better for cable management, see below.

    Quote:
    The sentence doesn't make sense to me; are you telling me the case is too small "and" it definitely lacks cable management; or the case is too small but it definitely "doesn't" lack cable management? I just want to make sure I'm not misreading information.


    The cable management feature includes a CPU retention hole - making it easier to install aftermarket coolers - and cable management means the ability to route PSU and power cables behind the motherboard to save space and improve the way your system's air flow functions.

    Quote:
    I didn't choose a 560 Ti, I chose a non Ti. Are there more benefits with going with a Ti?


    For the most part the 560 you chose is a reference design. The 560TIs like the one from EVGA and Asus are based on the manufacturer's own designs and are usually factory overclocked to support higher speeds - you will definitely notice the difference on a video production system.

    Quote:
    I like the Corsair Carbide but I'm trying to keep cost low, any particular reason why I should go with that case or why that case is better than the HAF 912? I do see that the cases are bigger, however, my plan was to go with a modular power supply so that way it I could stay with a slightly smaller case. Is this a bad idea?


    The HAF 912 is a performance enthusiast case and it includes tons of extras that are not found anywhere in the price range - and I've used cases from a lot of different manufacturers including CM, Antec, to crap brands like Apevia and Raidmax, and the HAF 912 is one of the best I've ever used. The Corsair is a good choice too but if you want to keep costs low go with the HAF 912.

    Quote:
    I've been reading up more on this and it seems that its more to do with the motherboard features.


    Yes that's correct - it's all about what features your motherboard manufacturer will provide than anything else.

    Quote:
    So the P67 are not going to be Ivy Bride compatible?


    Any motherboard that has socket LGA 1155 will support Ivy Bridge - that includes H67 and H61, the Z68 has more features than P67 does like smart HD/SSD caching and 3TB hard drive support.

    Quote:
    Thanks I didn't know about this. What about this CORSAIR Vengeance Model CMZ8GX3M2A1600C9 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Prod [...] 6820233144


    That's a decent choice but the tall heat sinks will not be good for installing aftermarket coolers as they will interfere with your cooler's PWM fan. Go low profile - Corsair is a good choice but Kingston and Crucial have significantly lower fail rates. The top-tier RAM manufacturers are usually Crucial, Corsair, Kingston Hyper X, G.Skill, Mushkin, and PNY.

    Try this instead: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820148544


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