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Partitioning HDD for OS

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June 17, 2012 7:05:58 PM

How much so I partition my HDD for a copy of Windows 7 Ultimate ?

More about : partitioning hdd

a b $ Windows 7
June 17, 2012 7:08:50 PM

2561755,1,1226041 said:
How much so I partition my HDD for a copy of Windows 7 Ultimate ?[/quotemsg
depends on if you want to make a main drive and a data drive..most times people let windows make the two partions it needs too. a system partion and a main partion. anything else is up to you.
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June 17, 2012 7:15:34 PM

Right now I don't even have anything partitioned, I just have the OS installed in the drive. Now when I want to reinstall the OS for maintenance I just wanna format the partition for the OS only so I don't lose my programs and everything
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a b $ Windows 7
June 17, 2012 7:18:59 PM

its a good rule of thumb to leave around 20gb for win7
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June 17, 2012 7:25:26 PM

What about the windows updates, do those go on the partition or the main part

dudewitbow said:
its a good rule of thumb to leave around 20gb for win7

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a b $ Windows 7
June 17, 2012 7:29:54 PM

it will be in the win7, if you want more room on the partition for the OS just in case, than stretching the partition only for the OS to 30gb will probably be enough.
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a b $ Windows 7
June 17, 2012 8:05:23 PM

I would say 40gb or 60gb. 60 is plenty. And you are correct. windows updates and log files go to the system drive natively and I'm not sure if it can be changed, I never bothered looking.
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June 17, 2012 10:15:22 PM

abCasPeRR said:
Right now I don't even have anything partitioned, I just have the OS installed in the drive. Now when I want to reinstall the OS for maintenance I just wanna format the partition for the OS only so I don't lose my programs and everything



It depends on the type of user you are (your needs and usage) - your applications will dictate how much space you need.

What the capacity of your Hard Disk Drive?
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June 17, 2012 10:18:28 PM

I have a 320gb hdd for my main applications and I have a 250gb hdd for movies photos etc

ndositwe said:
It depends on the type of user you are (your needs and usage) - your applications will dictate how much space you need.

What the capacity of your Hard Disk Drive?

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June 17, 2012 10:25:35 PM

abCasPeRR said:
I have a 320gb hdd for my main applications and I have a 250gb hdd for movies photos etc


What do you use your computer for (e.g. productivity, gaming etc)?
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June 17, 2012 11:05:56 PM

abCasPeRR said:
I have a 320gb hdd for my main applications and I have a 250gb hdd for movies photos etc



If I were in your shoes, I would partition the primary drive (320GB) as follows: 100GB for the operating system/applications; and 220GB for data (documents, movies, photos etc).

In addition (OPTIONAL), since Windows 7 has a great back-up feature for creating a Windows System Image, with the secondary drive (250GB), I would partition it 100GB for Windows System Image Back Up and the remaining 150GB for data (documents, movies, photos etc). The 100GB partition on the secondary drive for Windows OS/application Image Back Up may appear a waste, but trust me that it is worth it - worthy to restoring your system should your operating system fail or primary hard drive die.

My PC's main drive is 750GB, which I partitioned 500GB for the operating system and applications (office suite, tools and games etc) and 250GB for my data. In addition, there are five 500GB HDD - four for storing my organized data and the fifth drive for storing a complete Windows System Image Back Up.
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June 17, 2012 11:10:25 PM

Gaming

ndositwe said:
What do you use your computer for (e.g. productivity, gaming etc)?

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June 17, 2012 11:22:49 PM

abCasPeRR said:
Gaming


If that is the case, then ignore my previous comment of partitioning 100GB for your OS/applications to preferably doing a 200GB partition, and leaving 120GB for your data. Game installs take up HUGE space.
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June 17, 2012 11:57:26 PM

Ok and I have a question, when I go to install another application or anything like that how do I get it to save to that particular partition ?

ndositwe said:
If that is the case, then ignore my previous comment of partitioning 100GB for your OS/applications to preferably doing a 200GB partition, and leaving 120GB for your data. Game installs take up HUGE space.

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June 18, 2012 1:52:34 AM

abCasPeRR said:
Ok and I have a question, when I go to install another application or anything like that how do I get it to save to that particular partition ?


By default, Windows OS installs (saves) applications to the primary partition (C: partition) unless you specify otherwise. To keep things simple, install to where the OS is pointing you to. If you are 'reinstalling' the OS for maintenance and you installed programs/applications in other partitions/drives from your previous OS before failure/corruption, some/most of the programs/applications will not work; as a result, you will still be required to reinstall your programs/applications again.

The smart thing you can do is using Windows 7's built-in System Image Back Up facility. A System Image is a complete snapshot of your operating system with its installed applications as on the date of back-up. For example, say your PC's Windows 7 Ultimate OS has installed MS Office 2010, Adobe Photoshop, Firefox 11, Dead Space 2, Need for Speed The Run, StarCraft 2 and Norton Antivirus 360, and 15 Word Document files in your Documents Folder... all these (OS, applications and files) residing in C: partition. You then do a do a 'System Image Back Up.' Now lets have a scenario where your computer will crash in the next 4 days and it will require you to reinstall the OS and applications. On Day 3 after the System Image Back Up, you install OpenOffice.org and iTunes, uninstalled Dead Space 2, updated Firefox to version 12, and deleted 3 of your 15 files from your documents folder. Day 4 disaster strikes crippling your PC's OS. Now instead of having to reinstall your OS and applications (losing on product/activation keys and having to buy again), you can simply initiate System Image Restore, which will restore your operating system in the state it was 4 days ago with Windows 7 Ultimate, Office 2010, Adobe Photoshop, Firefox 11, Dead Space 2, Need for Speed The Run, StarCraft 2 and Norton Antivirus, and the 15 files in your Documents folder - the changes made on Day 3 will not be present.

So, install your programs/applications by default in the C: partition for simplicity keeping your programs/applications organized.
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July 1, 2012 6:13:07 AM

Best answer selected by abcasperr.
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a b $ Windows 7
July 1, 2012 11:18:19 AM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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