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Aprox cost?

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March 3, 2012 1:17:46 AM

I plan to build my own gaming desktop starting in the summer, and I need an aprox. cost. I would like to have the following (can anyone recommend some specific models for each?):

Intel i7 or AMD Phenom II (Which is better for general gaming?)
Nvidia GPU (What are the benefits of having 2 GPUs vs 1?)
50-60GB SSD for OS and Game installation
1TB Hard drive 7200RPM
8 GB RAM (preferably expandable to 16GB)
1080p Computer Monitor

Also, how much would a motherboard holding these things cost?

More about : aprox cost

a c 84 B Homebuilt system
a b 4 Gaming
March 3, 2012 1:39:07 AM

Iamazn said:
I plan to build my own gaming desktop starting in the summer, and I need an aprox. cost. I would like to have the following (can anyone recommend some specific models for each?):

Intel i7 or AMD Phenom II (Which is better for general gaming?)
Nvidia GPU (What are the benefits of having 2 GPUs vs 1?)
50-60GB SSD for OS and Game installation
1TB Hard drive 7200RPM
8 GB RAM (preferably expandable to 16GB)
1080p Computer Monitor

Also, how much would a motherboard holding these things cost?


By summer, you will be looking at a ivy bridge based build.
Today, the best gaming chip is the 2500K. I7 is not necessary, and amd is a very poor option. Expect to pay about $230.

If you are not planning on triple monitor gaming, then the best option in my view is a good single card.
Dual cards may look good in synthetic benchmarks, but there are issues.

60gb is minimum for the os and a few games. 80gb is better.

Z68 motherboards will be $100 to $150 or so. You can pay more, if you want to try record level overclocks. Useless for gaming.
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March 3, 2012 2:29:43 PM

geofelt said:
By summer, you will be looking at a ivy bridge based build.
Today, the best gaming chip is the 2500K. I7 is not necessary, and amd is a very poor option. Expect to pay about $230.

If you are not planning on triple monitor gaming, then the best option in my view is a good single card.
Dual cards may look good in synthetic benchmarks, but there are issues.

60gb is minimum for the os and a few games. 80gb is better.

Z68 motherboards will be $100 to $150 or so. You can pay more, if you want to try record level overclocks. Useless for gaming.

What would be a good GFX card?
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March 5, 2012 5:49:03 AM

geofelt said:
By summer, you will be looking at a ivy bridge based build.
Today, the best gaming chip is the 2500K. I7 is not necessary, and amd is a very poor option. Expect to pay about $230

-What is an "ivy bridge" based build?
-If the i7 is newer, why is the 2500k a better chip?
Also, could someone please list everything I need to actually build a desktop? I only know of the common things, i.e. CPU/GPU/Case/HDD/Mobo...
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a c 84 B Homebuilt system
a b 4 Gaming
March 5, 2012 1:44:06 PM

The current Intel cpu generation is called "sandy bridge". It has i3, i5, and i7 variants. i3 has 2 cores,i5 and i7 have 4. About April, the successor product line, called "ivy bridge" will launch.
It is the same architecture, but based on a newer, smaller, 22nm technology. That will make the chips faster by about 10%, and cheaper to produce.
You can expect to get more for your money in your time frame.

Few games today, need, or can use more than 2 or 3 cores. Faster cores are better than more cores for gaming. The i5 series has 4 cores which is plenty.
The i7 series also has 4 cores, but it also has 4 added "hyperthread" cores. This capability uses residual cycles from the main cores to give the effect of added cores.
These added cores are worth perhaps 1/4 the power of a main core. For gaming, the addrd threads are not of much help, that is why the i5 is as good as it gets for gaming today. You can expect the ivy bridge offerings to sell at comparable prices to today's.

The real engine of gaming is more the graphics card than the cpu.
Read this article which will give you some guidance on what you can get for your money:
For best gaming, buy the best single graphics card you feel comfortable paying for.
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-graphics-car...

You have plenty of time to research and get educated.

Do so.
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March 6, 2012 2:20:37 AM

geofelt said:
This tom's article will give you guidance an many price points.
When kepler launches, as it might within your time frame, all bets will be off:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-graphics-car...

What time might kepler launch? Is it worth waiting for?

geofelt said:
The current Intel cpu generation is called "sandy bridge". It has i3, i5, and i7 variants. i3 has 2 cores,i5 and i7 have 4. About April, the successor product line, called "ivy bridge" will launch.
It is the same architecture, but based on a newer, smaller, 22nm technology. That will make the chips faster by about 10%, and cheaper to produce.
You can expect to get more for your money in your time frame.
Then I will probably start buying parts in April.

2533527,6,120121 said:
Few games today, need, or can use more than 2 or 3 cores. Faster cores are better than more cores for gaming. The i5 series has 4 cores which is plenty.
The i7 series also has 4 cores, but it also has 4 added "hyperthread" cores. This capability uses residual cycles from the main cores to give the effect of added cores.
These added cores are worth perhaps 1/4 the power of a main core. For gaming, the addrd threads are not of much help, that is why the i5 is as good as it gets for gaming today. You can expect the ivy bridge offerings to sell at comparable prices to today's.
So basically, i7 IS better than the i5, but the extra features are useless when it comes to general gaming. What might be the price difference?

2533527,6,120121 said:

You have plenty of time to research and get educated.

Do so.
[/quote][/quote]
said:
said:

I plan to get as much information about the parts I buy before I buy them. I won't want this computer ending up like my last purchase.

As for the RAM, SSD/HDD and case, do you have any specific brand or model recommendations?

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a c 84 B Homebuilt system
a b 4 Gaming
March 6, 2012 2:30:59 AM

Cases are a personal thing. Buy one that appeals to you.
It needs to be able to hold your parts, and have decent ventilation. Two 120mm intake or exhaust fans will do it.
Personally, I like smaller cases with micro-atx sized motherboards.

Most ram is good. I have used G.skil, corsair, patriot and kingston without problem.
More ram is better than faster ram. Look for a 8gb kit(2 x 4gb) of DDR3 1333 or 1600 ram. No need for fancy heat spreaders with 1.5v ram.

I love the SSD for the os and some apps. 60gb is minimum, 80gb-120gb is better.
Wait for hard drive prices to come dowh if you can.
Get a good brand. Intel 520 series has a 5 year warranty. Samsung 830 is my second choice.

If you want Nvidia, kepler will be worth waiting for. It should launch in your time frame.
AMD 28nm cards are very good today.
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
a b 4 Gaming
March 6, 2012 3:14:42 AM

Iamazn said:
What time might kepler launch? Is it worth waiting for?


I plan to get as much information about the parts I buy before I buy them. I won't want this computer ending up like my last purchase.

As for the RAM, SSD/HDD and case, do you have any specific brand or model recommendations?



Looks like everyone has you pretty well covered.. But my answer to your first question in this post is "no". There is always a bigger, better, nicer, higher performing computer component coming out in x amount of months. Its a race you can never win. Figure out what you need NOW, when you're actually are in the market for it.

Quote:

As for the RAM, SSD/HDD and case, do you have any specific brand or model recommendations?


RAM- RAM is RAM in my experience in terms of brand names. I've never heard of a brand who had a reputation of being "bad". You'll ideally want at least 2 modules as most motherboards support dual-channel mode. The short simple explanation to this is. If you have 8GB of RAM, 2 4GB modules will perform better than a single 8GB. Thats in theory though, because one of my 2 RAM modules died on me the other day and I'm awaiting a warranty replacement, I haven't noticed a difference yet in performance with a single one. But I'm not really into heavy games, so that could be why.

I don't think SSDs at this time are worth their price, thats a personal opinion, take it or leave it.

As far as HDD brands, theres only 3. Hitachi, Seagate, and Western Digital. I've always had Seagate harddrives in my computers as far back as I can remember. I didn't deliberately choose them, that just happened to be what my computers had) as this is my first custom build (ironically, I'm running a WD in this build). I have no complaints about Seagate, but then again, so far I can't really complain about any of them. I don't think you can go wrong picking any of them. Just figure out how much storage you need and your price limit, and go from there.
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March 6, 2012 4:13:37 AM

nekulturny said:
Looks like everyone has you pretty well covered.. But my answer to your first question in this post is "no". There is always a bigger, better, nicer, higher performing computer component coming out in x amount of months. Its a race you can never win. Figure out what you need NOW, when you're actually are in the market for it.

I know this, but occasionally, there are some milestones worth waiting for...
And also, does anyone have an aprox release date on the kepler series?
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March 6, 2012 5:06:24 AM

I just realized that I'm going to need a sound and wireless card as well... Does anyone have a price estimate on those two items?
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
a b 4 Gaming
March 6, 2012 5:15:15 AM

Iamazn said:
I just realized that I'm going to need a sound and wireless card as well... Does anyone have a price estimate on those two items?



No, you won't need a sound card, most modern MOBO's come with this integrated.


Wireless card shouldn't run you more than 20 bucks.
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March 8, 2012 3:45:51 AM

After much thinking, I probably will not wait for Ivy Bridge or Kepler. What size case/power supply/mobo should I be looking for if I want the following?
Intel i5-2500k
8GB RAM - Expandable up to 16GB
80GB SSD
1TB HDD
Blu Ray OR CD/DVD Burner
GTX 570
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
a b 4 Gaming
March 8, 2012 6:43:54 AM

550 watts should be sufficient for your purposes. Keep in mind, this probably won't be sufficient if you ever decide to run SLi (add a 2nd video card). with two 570s, I'd recommend stepping up to a 750 watt.

As far as a case, this is a personal preference thing, pick a case you like. As long as it will support the form factor of the motherboard you choose, pick a color, pick a design, whatever looks pretty to you. Just try to look for one that isn't a toaster oven (not a lot of ventilation). Unless you're a real fan of the case design, try to buy one that doesn't come with a Power supply, and if it does, use one that you buy. PSUs that come in a set with cases are generally junk and insufficient for the needs of a powerful card like a 570.

For all intents and purposes there are only 2 form factors of motherboards in heavy use today (ATX and MicroATX). Most cases will support both, but check this just to be sure.

For the motherboard, you need Socket 1155. 1156 (don't let the higher number fool you) is the older generation. The 2500k will not work in the 1156 socket.

MSI, Gigabyte and Asus are all very good motherboard manufacturers.

If I weren't the "AMD fanboy" that I am, this is what I'd go with, essentially speaking based on expandability the board I'm running in my computer is it's AMD counterpart, you can go cheaper if you like, but this is a good middle-of-the-road board:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Some motherboards do have Wi-Fi receivers built in, (since you mentioned you would like one), although it may cost more and not offer any performance over installing a wireless card in the PCI slot.
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March 8, 2012 6:59:30 AM

ok , get asrock mobo for $160, it has realtek sound integrated. than any sandy bridge you see fit, but id say 2500k or 2600k, your call. dont get wireless card, stick with wired, faster and more reliable. 8gb ram is more than plenty, get 2 4gb sticks for best value, i have corsair but hear gskill and patriot are good also. coolermaster makes awesome cases so look there and choose. gpu, get the absolute best you can afford now and a psu with enough juice to run two of those cards. corsair also for the psu. id suggest a 1200w psu, extreme overkill for one or two cards but if you ever want to run three way sli you will thank me. if money is limited id say at least 850w. good luck dude, happy gaming.
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March 8, 2012 7:24:37 AM

the only reason i'd sugest a 1200w psu is that you will never need to upgrade it again. other parts will come and go, but that psu, it will stay. a good investment if you ask me. i wish i got a 1200w when i built my pc. now, not even a year later, i want to upgrade it.
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
a b 4 Gaming
March 8, 2012 7:37:36 AM

Perhaps, but generally, we're seeing a trend of more powerful computer components that use less energy. Its slow, but sure. And whos to say they won't change the connector standards on us again?

Personally, I'm more likely to replace a video card with a better one rather than add a 2nd or 3rd.
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March 8, 2012 9:40:00 AM

Iamazn said:
I plan to build my own gaming desktop starting in the summer, and I need an aprox. cost. I would like to have the following (can anyone recommend some specific models for each?):

Intel i7 or AMD Phenom II (Which is better for general gaming?)
Nvidia GPU (What are the benefits of having 2 GPUs vs 1?)
50-60GB SSD for OS and Game installation
1TB Hard drive 7200RPM
8 GB RAM (preferably expandable to 16GB)
1080p Computer Monitor

Also, how much would a motherboard holding these things cost?



Man you should get amd A8 series processer because they are better and you might not even want to get GPU because its on board on Amd(A series processors) :bounce: 
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
a b 4 Gaming
March 8, 2012 10:33:13 PM

ramish said:
Man you should get amd A8 series processer because they are better and you might not even want to get GPU because its on board on Amd(A series processors) :bounce: 



Sandy Bridge has something like this as well. While APU's are better than traditional integrated graphics most commonly found on laptops, its still largely in its infancy stage, and is nowhere near matching a stand-alone graphics card for heavy gaming.

APUs is a whole new arms-race between Intel and AMD. I don't know whos winning yet, the A8 series processors, ARE supposed to be really, really good, even so, its not quite ready to throw its chips down against a GTX 570.
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March 9, 2012 1:06:05 AM

nekulturny said:
550 watts should be sufficient for your purposes. Keep in mind, this probably won't be sufficient if you ever decide to run SLi (add a 2nd video card). with two 570s, I'd recommend stepping up to a 750 watt.

As far as a case, this is a personal preference thing, pick a case you like. As long as it will support the form factor of the motherboard you choose, pick a color, pick a design, whatever looks pretty to you. Just try to look for one that isn't a toaster oven (not a lot of ventilation). Unless you're a real fan of the case design, try to buy one that doesn't come with a Power supply, and if it does, use one that you buy. PSUs that come in a set with cases are generally junk and insufficient for the needs of a powerful card like a 570.

For all intents and purposes there are only 2 form factors of motherboards in heavy use today (ATX and MicroATX). Most cases will support both, but check this just to be sure.

For the motherboard, you need Socket 1155. 1156 (don't let the higher number fool you) is the older generation. The 2500k will not work in the 1156 socket.

MSI, Gigabyte and Asus are all very good motherboard manufacturers.

If I weren't the "AMD fanboy" that I am, this is what I'd go with, essentially speaking based on expandability the board I'm running in my computer is it's AMD counterpart, you can go cheaper if you like, but this is a good middle-of-the-road board:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Some motherboards do have Wi-Fi receivers built in, (since you mentioned you would like one), although it may cost more and not offer any performance over installing a wireless card in the PCI slot.

-What's the main difference between a MicroATX and an ATX?
-If I plan to eventually upgrade my CPU to a i7 series, will I need to change the motherboard?

tjosborne said:
ok , get asrock mobo for $160, it has realtek sound integrated. than any sandy bridge you see fit, but id say 2500k or 2600k, your call. dont get wireless card, stick with wired, faster and more reliable. 8gb ram is more than plenty, get 2 4gb sticks for best value, i have corsair but hear gskill and patriot are good also. coolermaster makes awesome cases so look there and choose. gpu, get the absolute best you can afford now and a psu with enough juice to run two of those cards. corsair also for the psu. id suggest a 1200w psu, extreme overkill for one or two cards but if you ever want to run three way sli you will thank me. if money is limited id say at least 850w. good luck dude, happy gaming.

-The place I'm going to put the Desktop is nowhere near my modem, so I need to use wireless. :/ 
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
a b 4 Gaming
March 9, 2012 1:19:48 AM

Iamazn said:
-What's the main difference between a MicroATX and an ATX?
-If I plan to eventually upgrade my CPU to a i7 series, will I need to change the motherboard?


-The place I'm going to put the Desktop is nowhere near my modem, so I need to use wireless. :/ 



A microATX is simply smaller, it may or may not have less expansion slots, DIMM slots, SATA slots, etc. It depends on the manufacturer and the model. NO, you will not need to change the motherboard as long as the socket is the same. A socket 1155 motherboard will work with both SandyBridge i5's and i7s. Theoretically, the Z68 chipset on the board I recommended will also support the upcoming Ivy Bridge, however, there is no guarantee of this until the product is actually released.


As far as the wireless thing, I too have a computer that is a relatively great distance from my router, you will as a rule have better performance from a wired connection, its a lot of work to run a long wire, but I have done so. That may involve more work than most people are prepared to do (in my case, a hole was drilled through cement/brick to run a wire). Just make sure you have a decent router with a good strong signal, and you'll be fine with wireless. I have a Belkin something something from Walmart that was about 70 bucks and my laptop works just fine even through the brick walls (its a 300 year old house with a 100 year old addition on the first floor where the router is located-hence the brick wall)

BTW, Asrock since it was a MOBO brand recommended is a subsidiary of Asus. Sort of like Lincoln is a fancy Ford... But Asrock is the Ford, Asus is the Lincoln.
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a c 84 B Homebuilt system
a b 4 Gaming
March 9, 2012 1:55:55 AM

Iamazn said:
-What's the main difference between a MicroATX and an ATX?
-If I plan to eventually upgrade my CPU to a i7 series, will I need to change the motherboard?


-The place I'm going to put the Desktop is nowhere near my modem, so I need to use wireless. :/ 


A Micro-ATX motherboard will have 4 expansion slots vs. 7 on a full ATX motherboard.

It will include a pcie-X16 slot, and perhaps another.
How many expansion slots past the discrete graphics card does anybody really need these days?
Upgrades are determined by the chipset(H67, Z68 etc.) Upgrade to i7 is not an issue.
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March 9, 2012 2:01:36 AM

nekulturny said:
BTW, Asrock since it was a MOBO brand recommended is a subsidiary of Asus. Sort of like Lincoln is a fancy Ford... But Asrock is the Ford, Asus is the Lincoln.



Asrock used to be a subsidiary of ASUS. They are now an independent company - which seems to compete quite well against its "dislodged" progenitor ;) 
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
a b 4 Gaming
March 9, 2012 2:06:10 AM

440bx said:
Asrock used to be a subsidiary of ASUS. They are now an independent company - which seems to compete quite well against its "dislodged" progenitor ;) 



Ah did they? Good for them. :p 
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March 9, 2012 2:42:17 AM

RAM: G-Skill ripjaws Xseries 2x4gb PC 12800 1600MHZ
HDD: 1 TB Hitachi Deckstar 7200 RPM SATA III(6Gb/s)
SSD: Samsung 830 series 128GB SATA III (6Gb/s)
CPU: i5 2500K UNLOCKED AND UNLEASED
MB: Z68 chipset LGA 1155 socket(lots of brands to choose from)
PSU: OCZ ModXstream Pro 700 watts 80+ certified
Video Card: AMD Radeon 7900 series(lots of brands to choose from)
PC Case: Cooler Master HAF 932 Black Edition
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master 212 Hyper Plus

These are just my suggestions, it is you who will still decide what to buy depending on your budget and needs.
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March 14, 2012 3:20:02 AM

aqe040466 said:
RAM: G-Skill ripjaws Xseries 2x4gb PC 12800 1600MHZ
HDD: 1 TB Hitachi Deckstar 7200 RPM SATA III(6Gb/s)
SSD: Samsung 830 series 128GB SATA III (6Gb/s)
CPU: i5 2500K UNLOCKED AND UNLEASED
MB: Z68 chipset LGA 1155 socket(lots of brands to choose from)
PSU: OCZ ModXstream Pro 700 watts 80+ certified
Video Card: AMD Radeon 7900 series(lots of brands to choose from)
PC Case: Cooler Master HAF 932 Black Edition
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master 212 Hyper Plus

These are just my suggestions, it is you who will still decide what to buy depending on your budget and needs.

-I found a 2TB Hitachi for only $160, why are they so cheap?
-http://www.amazon.com/Cooler-Master-Advanced-SuperSpeed...
This is the HAF 932, right?
-Will the Z68 MB support 3 hard drives? I'm hoping to get a SSD, the 2TB Hitachi and a Velociraptor.
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
a b 4 Gaming
March 14, 2012 5:46:10 AM

Iamazn said:
-I found a 2TB Hitachi for only $160, why are they so cheap?
-http://www.amazon.com/Cooler-Master-Advanced-SuperSpeed...
This is the HAF 932, right?
-Will the Z68 MB support 3 hard drives? I'm hoping to get a SSD, the 2TB Hitachi and a Velociraptor.

1. I just bought a 2TB Seagate from Best Buy this afternoon for 120. Its a 3gbs (slower data rate). That could be the reason the Hitachi is so cheap.

2. Looks like it to me.

3. Yes, provided the motherboard has enough SATA connectors (and they all do)
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March 15, 2012 2:08:52 AM

In the link I provided to the HAF 932, does the case come with fans or do I need to buy and install them myself?
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March 15, 2012 5:08:31 AM

Two more questions:
-Will the HAF932 and the Z68 mobo be able to support SLI/Crossfire? i.e. is there enough space to store 2+ GPUs?
-I want to wait for summer before picking out a GPU. What are the chances that summer will also bring in a new generation of Mobos/CPUs? (My current CPU choice is the i7 2600k)
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
a b 4 Gaming
March 15, 2012 9:21:48 AM

Iamazn said:
Two more questions:
-Will the HAF932 and the Z68 mobo be able to support SLI/Crossfire? i.e. is there enough space to store 2+ GPUs?
-I want to wait for summer before picking out a GPU. What are the chances that summer will also bring in a new generation of Mobos/CPUs? (My current CPU choice is the i7 2600k)


The case does include fans. Per Newegg this is what it includes:
Quote:
140mm Fans
1 x 140mm rear fan

230mm Fans
1 x 230mm front red LED fan
1 x 230mm top fan
1 x 230mm side fan


This depends on the motherboard. I don't know if all brands and models Z68 motherboards come with this or not. But regardless, the best way to know is to look at the motherboard specs from the merchant you're purchasing it from. It will say if it it supports SLi and/or crossfire.

The case should accommodate 2 video cards yes. Looking at it, its a pretty roomy case. How many it can accommodate relies on other factors. You may purchase a motherboard that has 3 or 4 Video card slots, but many video card models that are SLi/Crossfire capable may only allow 2 to run in tandem.


As far as a new generation of Mobos/CPUs. I did a google search, apparently Intel is set to release their Ivy Bridge CPUs in the next couple of months (April 8th according to one website I found), they will also be releasing new chipsets along with them. However, theres never a guarantee.
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March 21, 2012 2:30:53 AM

I'm going to wait for summer before I pick a CPU/GPU, but I'd like to start shopping for other parts right now. By summer, there should be a new generation of CPU/GPUs. As for now, what parts are "safe" to buy? In other words, what parts will not have any new technology/generations coming out by summer?
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
a b 4 Gaming
March 21, 2012 2:55:49 AM

Iamazn said:
I'm going to wait for summer before I pick a CPU/GPU, but I'd like to start shopping for other parts right now. By summer, there should be a new generation of CPU/GPUs. As for now, what parts are "safe" to buy? In other words, what parts will not have any new technology/generations coming out by summer?



Whats "safe"?

Case

Power Supply

RAM is fairly safe for the time being. 8GB modules are available, but at least in my experience, they were hard to find available. Not a lot of call for em yet. DDR4 is in the works, but from what I gather, we're still a couple years from it.

CPU cooler is fairly safe, most of them support tons of different processors.

Hard drive

SSD, I wouldn't jump on just yet.
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March 21, 2012 5:01:31 AM

nekulturny said:
Whats "safe"?

Case

Power Supply

RAM is fairly safe for the time being. 8GB modules are available, but at least in my experience, they were hard to find available. Not a lot of call for em yet. DDR4 is in the works, but from what I gather, we're still a couple years from it.

CPU cooler is fairly safe, most of them support tons of different processors.

Hard drive

SSD, I wouldn't jump on just yet.

Case:
Most likely the one I posted earlier, unless I can find a better one.

Power Supply:
I plan to start with 1 GPU and 1 monitor, but I would like to eventually go SLI or Crossfire with dual monitors. What power supply should I choose?
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
a b 4 Gaming
March 21, 2012 5:49:21 AM

Iamazn said:
Case:
Most likely the one I posted earlier, unless I can find a better one.

Power Supply:
I plan to start with 1 GPU and 1 monitor, but I would like to eventually go SLI or Crossfire with dual monitors. What power supply should I choose?


Well, I'll tell you, I changed out my cheap case I originally had for the case I should have bought in the first place. You should check out the NXZT Phantom, I have the green and black one. Its ridiculously roomy inside and it looks really nice. No disrespect to the case you picked, that looks like a pretty good one too, but I gotta push this Phantom, I can't get over how sleek it looks. Only gripe I have about it is the goofy rubber grommet things it uses to secure the hard drives in the trays, it has standard screw holes to mount them, I opted to use those.

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite...

Power supply really depends on the card you're getting, I would recommend a Corsair PSU.


I'm actually going to retract my previous statement about 750 watt being enough after a conversation with my professor, (I asked for her opinion regarding another thread a gentleman is having trouble getting his build to fire up), most likely caused by a high end graphic's card being driven by a pitiful PSU. Some folks on the forum have been saying you can use much lower wattage than recommended, but personally I'll take the word of my professor with a Master's degree in all this geek computer stuffs.

I'd go heavy as you can afford if you want to run SLi. Maybe even consider what tjosborne suggested, a 1200 watt. Thing about Corsair, so I'm told their PSUs are known to perform better than they're rated for. I'd say with 2 top of the line video cards 1000 watts out to give you plenty of power and then some.

http://www.corsair.com/power-supply-units/enthusiast-se...


Another note: My Gigabyte board died on me since I first posted in this thread, and after dealing with their tech support, I reserve recommending that brand to someone I don't like. I like you, therefore... forget I ever said Gigabyte made quality motherboards. :kaola: 
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Geofelt,

Quote:
A Micro-ATX motherboard will have 4 expansion slots vs. 7 on a full ATX motherboard.


Thats what I thought too. But my Sabertooth is full ATX and it only has 6... go figure. :ange: 
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March 22, 2012 5:14:05 AM

nekulturny said:
Well, I'll tell you, I changed out my cheap case I originally had for the case I should have bought in the first place. You should check out the NXZT Phantom, I have the green and black one. Its ridiculously roomy inside and it looks really nice. No disrespect to the case you picked, that looks like a pretty good one too, but I gotta push this Phantom, I can't get over how sleek it looks. Only gripe I have about it is the goofy rubber grommet things it uses to secure the hard drives in the trays, it has standard screw holes to mount them, I opted to use those.

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite...

Can you explain what you mean by:
"Only gripe I have about it is the goofy rubber grommet things it uses to secure the hard drives in the trays, it has standard screw holes to mount them, I opted to use those."
On a side note, that case looks amazing...

As for the PSU, should I be looking for a 1200w PSU, or will a 1000w PSU suffice?
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
a b 4 Gaming
March 22, 2012 5:36:25 AM

Iamazn said:
Can you explain what you mean by:
"Only gripe I have about it is the goofy rubber grommet things it uses to secure the hard drives in the trays, it has standard screw holes to mount them, I opted to use those."
On a side note, that case looks amazing...

As for the PSU, should I be looking for a 1200w PSU, or will a 1000w PSU suffice?


This is an older IDE drive I have, but in terms of mounting points, they're identical to newer SATA's.

I can do better than that, I'll show you. The rubber grommet thing I'm holding in my fingers, theres 2 of them on each side of the tray. They have a metal pin inside the rubber grommet that in theory should secure the drive in place. However, I find them unreliable. The pins pop out too easily.



Now, as you can see on the tray, there are holes on the bottom which allow screws to mount the hard drive (in fact this is how you would mount an SSD to one of them as well).



BTW, the NXZT Phantom comes with a whole crap ton of extra screws, you'll find what you need. I just used screws to mount the drives to the tray.

As far as power supply, probably the most powerful video card on the market today is the GTX 590. Heres a link to a graph that shows its power usage under load and at idle. http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/graphics/2011/03/24/nv...

Realistically, the cards you're gonna get wont be anywhere near as powerful (the GTX 590 costs a grand by itself)

Long and short, 1000 watts outta cover you just fine. Really that 950 watt Corsair should do the trick too, thats why I linked it to you.
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