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I5 Sandy vs i7 Ivy

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June 19, 2012 11:51:26 PM

I need some opinions. Currently have an i5 2500 and want to upgrade to a K model so I can overclock. Im definitely going to either get Ivy Bridge i5 or i7 at this point. Do you think if I plan this jump should I go with the i7 even though it is 100 dollars more as it should be a bit more future proof. I mostly flight sim but sometimes I have several different programs running at once just for the sim. Overall at this time the 100 dollars may not seem worth it but what about hyper threading a year or two from now, will games be out that will use it. If that was to happen Id kick myself for not going with the i7. Thanks for any ideas or input.

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June 20, 2012 1:00:23 AM

i5 for gaming if you use programs like gimp, photo shop,paint.net elect. And do video editing,rendering and that sort of stuff then i7
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June 20, 2012 1:04:17 AM

^+1 :)  just as bigcyco1 says. In other words, if ur rich enof not to feel the $100 loss, then go for the i7. I personally wudn't, coz the increase in performance doesn't justify that extra cost for my needs:) 
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June 20, 2012 1:19:06 AM

$hawn said:
^+1 :)  just as bigcyco1 says. In other words, if ur rich enof not to feel the $100 loss, then go for the i7. I personally wudn't, coz the increase in performance doesn't justify that extra cost for my needs:) 



I understand your point but what about a year or two from now. Do you think more applications will make use of hyper threading or is that goingto be past the life span of the CPU Ibuy tomorrow
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a c 106 K Overclocking
June 20, 2012 2:07:07 AM

I don't see more than 4 real cores being relevant to a gaming system until after the current generation of processors are obsolete. I would say 5 years plus.

As said above get the i7 if you use programs that can use the Hyperthreading. If you are mostly a gamer an i5 is perfect.

As for Sandy vs Ivy the newer Ivy Bridge processors are about 8% faster clock for clock but they produce more heat than Sandy Bridge and in general will not overclock as well at least not with a cheap air cooler. The higher potential overclock of Sandy Bridge pretty much equalizes the two.

Personally if I had an i5 2500 I would wait a year for Haswell to upgrade. Unless you are running 2 high end graphics cards and are seeing some bottlenecking a stock 2500 is a great processor.
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June 20, 2012 2:21:02 AM

anort3 said:
I don't see more than 4 real cores being relevant to a gaming system until after the current generation of processors are obsolete. I would say 5 years plus.

As said above get the i7 if you use programs that can use the Hyperthreading. If you are mostly a gamer an i5 is perfect.

As for Sandy vs Ivy the newer Ivy Bridge processors are about 8% faster clock for clock but they produce more heat than Sandy Bridge and in general will not overclock as well at least not with a cheap air cooler. The higher potential overclock of Sandy Bridge pretty much equalizes the two.

Personally if I had an i5 2500 I would wait a year for Haswell to upgrade. Unless you are running 2 high end graphics cards and are seeing some bottlenecking a stock 2500 is a great processor.



I think I wiil wait for Haswell. I was pondering that also but as a hobby I find the need to tinker around once and a while. Maybe I could use that money to upgrade from my AMD 6870 to a 7950 GPU. Thanks again
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June 20, 2012 2:21:41 AM

Best answer selected by Jackietools.
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June 20, 2012 3:02:18 AM

Jackietools said:
I think I wiil wait for Haswell. I was pondering that also but as a hobby I find the need to tinker around once and a while. Maybe I could use that money to upgrade from my AMD 6870 to a 7950 GPU. Thanks again



That's a good idea. You don't have to worry about bottlenecking at all until you start talking about 2 x GTX 670/680s or 2 x HD 7950s/7970s. Even then it's not much of an issue. You really only need a 4.5Ghz+ processor to drive a 3 or 4 gpu system. Unless of course you do processor intensive things like rendering or encoding.

Haswell should be a decent upgrade to what you have now.
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June 20, 2012 3:28:45 AM

anort3 said:
Ivy Bridge processors are about 8% faster clock for clock but they produce more heat than Sandy Bridge

Heat produced is proportional to TDP and IB's TDP is lower than SB. Temperatures on IB tend to be higher because it is more difficult to draw 77W out of a 140sqmm core than 95W out of a 210sqmm core... IB has ~20% higher power density, which means 20% less contact area per watt with the IHS on top of higher thermal resistance from the paste TIM instead of SB's solder.

Running hotter is not the same thing as producing more heat unless all other variables (which can be lumped up as junction-air thermal resistance) are otherwise identical. Knock the HSF off a CPU (this increases j-a resistance from ~0.5C/W for Intel's stock cooler to 15-20C/W) and it takes very little heat production (around 5W) to make them hit TJmax.
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June 20, 2012 3:46:13 AM

So if you want to keep the current temp a SB is producing overclocked and wanted to overclock an IB and keep that same temp you would need a better CPU cooling fan. Since you cant increase surface area of processor to dissipate heat you must use a larger heat sink with the fins having more surface area and or a fan that can run at higher speed to dissipate th heat
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June 20, 2012 4:17:35 AM

Bigger heatsinks and faster fans are not particularly effective.

The fundamental challenge with cooling an increasingly small hotspot lies in improving heat mobility away from the source. The speed at which heat travels through material is proportional to temperature difference and there is not much temperature difference left at the top of a large heatsink with fast fan so the extra cooling capacity goes to waste without the ability to carry heat that far fast enough to actually put it to use.

Heat pipes helped things along by providing a phase-change filler that moves heat along by evaporation, convection and condensation faster than propagation through solid copper would but to improve results further, "conventional" HSFs will need to find a new gimmick to increase heat mobility across the heatsink... maybe we'll see HSFs with integrated liquid-metal loop in place of heat pipes some day.
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June 20, 2012 9:12:14 AM

Jackietools said:
I need some opinions. Currently have an i5 2500 and want to upgrade to a K model so I can overclock. Im definitely going to either get Ivy Bridge i5 or i7 at this point. Do you think if I plan this jump should I go with the i7 even though it is 100 dollars more as it should be a bit more future proof. I mostly flight sim but sometimes I have several different programs running at once just for the sim. Overall at this time the 100 dollars may not seem worth it but what about hyper threading a year or two from now, will games be out that will use it. If that was to happen Id kick myself for not going with the i7. Thanks for any ideas or input.


I have an i5 2500 PC (in fact, two of them). My recent third build ('2nd Gen Core i' Series) is an i7 2600, although I still considered getting an i5 2500 CPU. My personal PC for 'everyday & gaming' is one of the i5. As for the second i5 and latest i7 build, I use them for business in Video Editing & Rendering.

So, I seriously think you are OKAY with the i5 2500 for the next few years. For instance, my four-year old back-up/spare PC is a Core 2 Quad Q9550 2.83GHz (8GB 1333MHz DDR3 RAM, Radeon HD 6850)... it still games excellently.

In your case, I see the upgrade to a K model or i7 more as a WANT than a NEED. Trust me, when I got the parts for the i7 build, I WANTed (was tempted) to swap the i5 CPU in my personal rig for the i7. I WANTed to replace with the i7 CPU because it was up there with the best. When friends/people saw my awesome rig, some would ask "Is it an i7?" and I would respond "i5"... I could see from their expressions and detect in their indirect speech "Why couldn't you get an i7?" I almost convinced myself installing the i7, but said to myself, "Hey, i5 is also up there with the best". The major difference and selling point of i7 against i5 is HYPERTHREADING.
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June 20, 2012 9:49:02 AM

Yes you are right, it is a want more than a need. Over 3 years ago when I first became interested in building a PC I had a Dell I bought in 2006 with P4 and. Gig or two of ram. Once the first Call of Duty came out I was hooked. Had to have 4 gigs ram, upgrade to an Amd 3650 GPU but Dell had its limits in what was proprietary. Tried for a year to find a better CPU but the propietary board would not allow it. Then I decided I would build my own. Luckily I am naturlly good at tinkering with mechanical and electric so just did some online research and built first PC. bought an MD 720 Phenom II X 3 but a year later was able to overclock to 3.2 gig and unlocked the fourth core. What I am thinking now I had wished I had originally bought the quad core and at a fate speed, did I relly need it? Probably not as you stated with my i5 and it ran fine for 3 years. Guess Ill stick ith the i5 but What do you think of a ne GPU. What card do you think will give me a marked improvement over the 6870? Do you think it ould also be superfluous to upgrade my video card? Thanks for opinion nd input.
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June 20, 2012 9:54:45 AM

anort3 said:
I don't see more than 4 real cores being relevant to a gaming system until after the current generation of processors are obsolete. I would say 5 years plus.

As said above get the i7 if you use programs that can use the Hyperthreading. If you are mostly a gamer an i5 is perfect.

As for Sandy vs Ivy the newer Ivy Bridge processors are about 8% faster clock for clock but they produce more heat than Sandy Bridge and in general will not overclock as well at least not with a cheap air cooler. The higher potential overclock of Sandy Bridge pretty much equalizes the two.

Personally if I had an i5 2500 I would wait a year for Haswell to upgrade. Unless you are running 2 high end graphics cards and are seeing some bottlenecking a stock 2500 is a great processor.


Agree with all of this. 4 cores is the sweet spot for gaming right now, and there's little reason to expect this to change in the near future. Hyperthreading is of no benefit in games if you have a quad.

A stock 2500 will not be a bottleneck unless you have 2 high end graphics cards, and even then, only rarely.

Bear in mind also that you can get a worthwhile overclock from a non-K 2500. +400MHz I believe. My second computer has an i5 2400, which is left permanently overclocked by 400MHz - I've never though this processor wasn't fast enough.

So, no need to upgrade really.
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June 20, 2012 10:00:39 AM

bwrlane said:
Agree with all of this. 4 cores is the sweet spot for gaming right now, and there's little reason to expect this to change in the near future. Hyperthreading is of no benefit in games if you have a quad.

A stock 2500 will not be a bottleneck unless you have 2 high end graphics cards, and even then, only rarely.

Bear in mind also that you can get a worthwhile overclock from a non-K 2500. +400MHz I believe. My second computer has an i5 2400, which is left permanently overclocked by 400MHz - I've never though this processor wasn't fast enough.

So, no need to upgrade really.



Did not realize that Ill take 400mhz. Ny suggestions how to do it. As far as I know the multiplier is locked. Not much experience with overclocking. The Amd was easy as it had the unlocked multiplier. Any sites or info how to change settings would be appreciated.
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June 20, 2012 11:22:55 AM

Jackietools said:
Yes you are right, it is a want more than a need. Over 3 years ago when I first became interested in building a PC I had a Dell I bought in 2006 with P4 and. Gig or two of ram. Once the first Call of Duty came out I was hooked. Had to have 4 gigs ram, upgrade to an Amd 3650 GPU but Dell had its limits in what was proprietary. Tried for a year to find a better CPU but the propietary board would not allow it. Then I decided I would build my own. Luckily I am naturlly good at tinkering with mechanical and electric so just did some online research and built first PC. bought an MD 720 Phenom II X 3 but a year later was able to overclock to 3.2 gig and unlocked the fourth core. What I am thinking now I had wished I had originally bought the quad core and at a fate speed, did I relly need it? Probably not as you stated with my i5 and it ran fine for 3 years. Guess Ill stick ith the i5 but What do you think of a ne GPU. What card do you think will give me a marked improvement over the 6870? Do you think it ould also be superfluous to upgrade my video card? Thanks for opinion nd input.


Just stick with the i5, it will serve you well for a few more years.

For the time being, the Radeon HD 6870 is still an impressive (mid-range) GPU... I don't think you should upgrade if it's running your games smoothly at the resolution and settings of your preference. Only upgrade when you need/have to. The thing about technological buffs like you and I, we can't get enough of the latest that's out there... there's always the urge to get/have the best.

Looking at your PC specifications (Intel i5-2500, Asus P8Z68-V mobo, 16 gig 1333 RAM, 1TB HDD, 1 120G SSD, AMD 6870, OCS 700W PSU), it's a great system. In terms of processing power, your platform setup is similar to mine with the difference of yours having an SSD and mine a two-way crossfire 6870 setup. With the setup you have, the only upgrade path in the 3+ years is GPU since you have a great CPU and the RAM is more than you NEED.

For me, the two 6870 GPUs cost me about $400. When I was building my PC in the fall of 2011, I settled for a Radeon HD 6870. I seriously didn't need a secondary 6870, but three months down the road, I got one to setup up two-way crossfire. I had never tried running multi-GPU configuration, so I got a second 6870 for experimentation and 'for show' (LOL). When I was building my 'Everyday & Gaming' PC, I WANTed and NEEDed it (1) to have POWER - running for 3+ years, and (2) also STAND OUT - create an impression on people.

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June 20, 2012 11:32:56 AM

My microsoft flight sim eats a lot of GPU. Do you think doubling up on another 6870 or a 7950? Doubling up on the 6870 will add more haet and need more power compared to a single 7950 but then there is the cost factor. Again like you said the flight sim works good with the setup but we always want that little extra. I just came across an extra 100 dollars and am just itching to upgrade something.
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June 20, 2012 11:35:35 AM

Forgot I have two SSD's. I keep my FSX and X-plane on an SSD along with an SSD for Windows and most other programs.
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June 20, 2012 1:08:19 PM

Jackietools said:
My microsoft flight sim eats a lot of GPU. Do you think doubling up on another 6870 or a 7950? Doubling up on the 6870 will add more haet and need more power compared to a single 7950 but then there is the cost factor. Again like you said the flight sim works good with the setup but we always want that little extra. I just came across an extra 100 dollars and am just itching to upgrade something.


If I were in your shoes, already owning a 6870, I'd have a hard decision making between an addition 6870 for Crossfire or a new upgrade to 7950 - it all boils down to MONEY and the PC's software/application usage. An additional 6870 will cost less than $200 whilst the 7950 roughly $400. If money is no option, then the HD 7950 is the way to go. If you have less than $200, you may consider Crossfire with 6870 or getting an Nvidia Geforce GTX 570 for under $300. The GTX 570 that outperforms the 6870 and matching it in-terms of up to four monitor displays is the Nvidia Galaxy MDT GeForce GTX 570 at $270.00

Newegg:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Amazon:
http://www.amazon.com/Galaxy-Mini-HDMI-Multi-Display-Gr...

Your motherboard is P8Z68-V. There are four types of these boards, which one is actually yours:
(1) P8Z68-V (as stated in your specification);
(2) P8Z68-V LE;
(3) P8Z68-V LX;
(4)or P8Z68-V Pro
?????
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June 20, 2012 1:55:10 PM

Top model, P8Z68-V I guess the least expensive but I have built around 8 PC's over the years for myself, daughters and other people and like Asus boards
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June 20, 2012 2:20:43 PM

Jackietools said:
Top model, P8Z68-V I guess the least expensive but I have built around 8 PC's over the years for myself, daughters and other people and like Asus boards


UNSERSTOOD. I was checking with you on the mother specification because out of the P8Z68-V variants, the P8Z68-V LX and P8Z68-V LE's second 'PCI Express 2.0 x 16' slot runs at x4 speed,... so Crossfire will run at x4 the speed. As for the other two top models (P8Z68-V and P8Z68-V PRO), they run at x8 in dual Crossfire setup. If you are going to Crossfire, the P8Z68-V (which you have) and P8Z68-V PRO are the boards to do it on (NOTE: these two boards are also SLI compatible compared to the others which are Crossfire EXCLUSIVE).

So, have you decided whether you will go Crossfire 6870 or replace with a 7950 upgrade?
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June 20, 2012 2:44:04 PM

Leaning toward the 7950 but then again if Im thinking if the 7950 why not 7970. If my wife finds out Im gonna get it! Luckily Im retired NYPD and can afford it but 500 is still a lot of money. What do you think up it to the 7970 for the extra 70-80 dollars?
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June 20, 2012 3:26:26 PM

Jackietools said:
Leaning toward the 7950 but then again if Im thinking if the 7950 why not 7970. If my wife finds out Im gonna get it! Luckily Im retired NYPD and can afford it but 500 is still a lot of money. What do you think up it to the 7970 for the extra 70-80 dollars?


My thoughts exactly when I was upgrading my 3-year old Core 2 Quad system getting it an HD 6850... I was like, "Why didn't I get a 6870?" (LOL). Eventually, I got a 6870 for my next build, but that was last year. This is the same dilemma you have between the 7950 and 7970. I tend to talk myself into saying "My PC is my own toy and investment. I don't have to spare expense for what I need it to do." I think the 7970 is a worthy buy for the extra $70-$80; therefore, ignore the 6870 Crossfire setup. The 6870 is now clocking 2 years in the GPU market, so investing in a new generation HD 7000 series is a wiser decision. As for me and my needs, the 6870 2-way Crossfire caters for mine :-) The 7970 will surely run your Flight Sim smoothly.

The other reason I am recommending the 7970 for you, is that it beats Nvidia GTX 580, which is last generation GPU (whilst HD 7970 is a newer generation card). They cost about the same.

Speaking of Crossfire, the thing about it is that it has gotten better over the years, though SLI tech is still king in the multi-GPU war. When I setup Crossfire earlier this year, I ran into weird anomalies in games, it irritated me. I had to go through the exercise of downloading and applying necessary patches and fixes for Crossfire for games that needed to run better. Both AMD and Nvidia make super great hardware (GPUs), but when it comes to drivers, Nvidia beats AMD.
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a c 233 à CPUs
a c 106 K Overclocking
June 20, 2012 4:42:52 PM

Jackietools said:
Did not realize that Ill take 400mhz. Ny suggestions how to do it. As far as I know the multiplier is locked. Not much experience with overclocking. The Amd was easy as it had the unlocked multiplier. Any sites or info how to change settings would be appreciated.



I should have menioned this. You can overclock a non "K" model processor 4 "bins" over stock via the turbo boost function.


http://www.overclock.net/t/1265974/can-you-do-any-sort-...


Make sure your temps are OK with this. Are you using a stock cooler?

You can only do this limited overclock with an i5 or i7 non "k" and on a P67, Z68 and I believe Z75 and Z77 boards. The i3 series and or a board that does not support overclocking will not allow any overclock at all.
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June 20, 2012 6:24:22 PM

I have stock but was thinking of a Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus. I just put one in my daughters PC ( I gave my old build with the unlocked and overclocked Phenom II X3 720. Her roo is always warm and figured it would help. Also my case is the Antec 900 si I have 2 front intakes ,rea and 200MM top exhaust so it stays pretty cool but if I overclock will probably go with the same cooler. On my daughters I had to remove the mobo to install but the Antec allows acess to underside of mobo to make it easier
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June 20, 2012 6:27:15 PM

I read it can be overclocked slightly but what exactly am I changing? Multiplier, front bus, voltage. I sort of need a guide to help me . What should I slightly increase first as far as settings then check for stability. Doesnt Intel make an automated overclocker(probably wont work on the i5 2500)
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a c 233 à CPUs
a c 106 K Overclocking
June 20, 2012 6:45:32 PM

I believe you just increase the Turbo multiplier. I don't think much stability testing will be necessary because pretty much 100% of i5 2500s can run at 4Ghz.

Leave the BCLK alone and see if you can increase your multiplier. You should be able to set the multi to 37 and with Turbo enabled this will give you a 4.1Ghz single core performance.

http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/cpus/2011/01/03/intel-...

http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/cpus/2011/01/03/intel-...
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June 20, 2012 8:09:25 PM

Think Ill give it a try later tonight. Thanks Ill let you know what happens
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June 21, 2012 1:50:36 PM

You are right. The regular multiplier is locked but I upped the turbo multiplier to 42 which shows a 4.1 frequency. Just did it. See what happens over the course of the day as I try it out
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June 21, 2012 3:44:28 PM

As far as a video card looks like the GT 670 is the best value compared to the 7950 or 7970
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June 22, 2012 7:56:59 AM

Jackietools said:
As far as a video card looks like the GT 670 is the best value compared to the 7950 or 7970


In terms of price and performace, the GTX 670 is the card to get between the HD 7950/7970. The 670's direct competition in performance is the HD 7970, though the latter costing higher (depending on the brand+model and where you get the card).

How many monitors do you run/use?
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June 22, 2012 8:46:26 AM

Just one but I want a card that will last me 2-3 years until my next upgrade. I agree with what you said. I always do my research before buying ( although I made the mistake of not getting the K model) and the 670 mathces or even beats the 7970 on the charts that the 100 dollars less it cost finitely makes it the choice. Hope there will be no problems going from AMD to Nvidea as far as the software. Of course I will remove all the Amd drivers first. I usually use Revo Uninstaller to o thorough removal.
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June 22, 2012 7:50:25 PM

Jackietools said:
Just one but I want a card that will last me 2-3 years until my next upgrade. I agree with what you said. I always do my research before buying ( although I made the mistake of not getting the K model) and the 670 mathces or even beats the 7970 on the charts that the 100 dollars less it cost finitely makes it the choice. Hope there will be no problems going from AMD to Nvidea as far as the software. Of course I will remove all the Amd drivers first. I usually use Revo Uninstaller to o thorough removal.


Just like you making the MISTAKE of not getting the K model, I made mine getting the 2500 instead of the 2600. But all in all, our mistakes were based on our WALLETS (Ha, ha, ha...) Our decisions getting the 2500 were WISE MISTAKES, but who knows, we may grow brains sooner getting the K model or 2600.

NO. You will have no problems going from AMD to Nvidia as far as software is concerned. If you do get the GTX 670, just uninstall AMD's Catalyst Control Center and drivers then swap out the 6870 for the 670. 2-3 years will be okay before you can upgrade since the GTX 670 just released this year.

Have you ever considered setting up and running multiple monitors (I highly recommend it)?
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June 22, 2012 9:02:35 PM

I do have some extra monitors around but not of matching sizes. My main is an Asus Ml228 21.5 inch 16X9 and I have a 19 inch NEC 4X3. How would that work with non matching monitors? I understand you can set it up but I dont think it would look right.
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a c 138 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
June 22, 2012 9:09:04 PM

Jackietools said:
How would that work with non matching monitors?

Do it, you should be able to sort it out easily enough.

Plug the 2nd/3rd display, enable it/them, extend the display to the extra screen(s), position them in the display properties UI so things line up in a way that makes sense, enjoy!

I have been using mismatched multi-monitor setups for the past 10+ years.
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June 22, 2012 9:29:15 PM

Jackietools said:
I do have some extra monitors around but not of matching sizes. My main is an Asus Ml228 21.5 inch 16X9 and I have a 19 inch NEC 4X3. How would that work with non matching monitors? I understand you can set it up but I dont think it would look right.


VERY TRUE - it may not look right/elegant having monitors of different sizes, but you get your work done in twice the time. If down the road you have money to blow, invest in VESA Mount compatible monitors of the same size. A multi-monitor setup of the same size would look elegant and be a fun experience (e.g. running your flight simulator). I have four 20-inch monitors hooked up to the Radeon HD 6870 - I only run three monitors in Eyefinity mode when gaming - the experience is GREAT.
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June 22, 2012 10:42:45 PM

You guy s piqued my interest. I always need something new to experiment with as well as something new to learn.
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June 23, 2012 6:33:34 AM

Jackietools said:
You guy s piqued my interest. I always need something new to experiment with as well as something new to learn.


When you learn/experiment with multi-monitor use, you will not want to go back to using just a single monitor. It looks professional and fun (depending how you set it up.

Have a look at some of these videos on youtube on the gaming side:
(Multi-monitor also works best when you are doing your everyday computing tasks)

Radeon HD 6870 Multi-Monitor Gaming
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mJeefx5_Qc&feature=rela...

Flight Simulation
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jScb_qisuZs&feature=rela...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rn5kqZoZgf0&feature=rela...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Gv7TX_Wvpk&feature=rela...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LUipToTX7cQ&feature=rela...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yh5K8dCv4Rk&feature=rela...
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June 23, 2012 10:38:27 AM

Ill take a look. The only limiting factor may be the amount of room I have on my desk.
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June 23, 2012 11:23:20 AM

Jackietools said:
Ill take a look. The only limiting factor may be the amount of room I have on my desk.


Size of the desk may indeed be limiting. But you can get creative in acquiring a select monitor stands. My desk also has limited space, so I got thinking of how to setup my monitors with the stands I purchased. I use two stands, each mounting two monitors (one stand vertical and one horizontal). Once in a while I change the configuration and orientation of the monitors on the stands.

These are the two stands I got for my quad-monitor setup:
http://www.amazon.com/Vertical-Freestanding-Dual-Monito...
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0036ISPSW/ref=oh_deta...

A friend of mine got these:
http://www.amazon.com/Tyke-Supply-Triple-Monitor-Stand/...
http://www.amazon.com/Dual-Monitor-Stand-clamp-monitors...
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June 23, 2012 1:56:14 PM

wow thanks for the info. Never realized they made stands for multiple screens like that. You learn something new everyday on these forums. The pole height would limit me. My desk has a shelf over the screen with a height of only 18 inches. That can cause a conflict unless I got a whole new desk.
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June 23, 2012 7:11:18 PM

Jackietools said:
wow thanks for the info. Never realized they made stands for multiple screens like that. You learn something new everyday on these forums. The pole height would limit me. My desk has a shelf over the screen with a height of only 18 inches. That can cause a conflict unless I got a whole new desk.


We sure do learn something new every day. Your desk may have limits, but just treat this info as food for thought for the future in case you do decide to setup up a multi-monitor environment. It is not a rush-rush project to setup a multi-monitor environment (it is quite an investment). My quad-monitor setup took me nine months. I started with two monitors, then six months later added a third and on the ninth month a fourth display. The four mounted monitors and chassis (case) both fit on my desk (it is a tight fit), but I want to get a slightly bigger desk. I can put my case under the desk to create space, but I like to admire my handy work of my i5-2500 Z68 build.
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June 23, 2012 7:25:39 PM

Send a photo if you can. Thanks.
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June 23, 2012 8:07:11 PM

Jackietools said:
Send a photo if you can. Thanks.


NO PROBLEM... I will be happy to send/share you photos of my system. I will send the photos in 2-3 days because I just disassembled my PC to clean out the dust. I have sent you a private message with my email address so you send me yours (if that is okay with you).
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!