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Photoshop Elements and Photoshop

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Anonymous
June 4, 2005 6:05:32 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Could anyone who has used Photoshop Elements and the full Photoshop
program tell me if they are very similar to use, with Photoshop just
having a few more professional features? I've been to the Adobe
website and I can't find a list comparing features.

If a person had Elements but took a beginners cours in Photoshop,
would she be able to apply most of what she learned to Elements? A
friend wants to buy and learn Elements, but the local community
college only has night courses in Photoshop.

Thank you,
Nancy

--
Anonymous
June 4, 2005 6:05:33 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Having used both, I can tell you that both PhotoShop and PhotoShop
Elements are VERY similar. You sure won't miss the "missing" features
for about $900 extra!
OfficeMax has PhotoShop Elements at a real good price.

See the http://stores.ebay.com/INTERNET-GUN-SHOW
Anonymous
June 4, 2005 6:05:33 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

N.Coffey commented courteously...

> Could anyone who has used Photoshop Elements and the
full
> Photoshop program tell me if they are very similar to
use,
> with Photoshop just having a few more professional
> features? I've been to the Adobe website and I can't
find a
> list comparing features.

Download and try the trial version of Paint Shop Pro 9.
Less than PSE and much more capable.

--
ATM, aka Jerry
Related resources
Anonymous
June 4, 2005 6:05:33 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

N.Coffey <ncoffey@netrover.com> wrote:

> Could anyone who has used Photoshop Elements and the full Photoshop
> program tell me if they are very similar to use, with Photoshop just
> having a few more professional features? I've been to the Adobe
> website and I can't find a list comparing features.

If you know you need 16-bit color space, and you know you need CYMK and
other color modes, then you know you need PS. If you don't know what
those things are, then you might only need Elements.

> If a person had Elements but took a beginners cours in Photoshop,
> would she be able to apply most of what she learned to Elements?

Yes.
Anonymous
June 4, 2005 7:17:50 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

N.Coffey wrote:
> Could anyone who has used Photoshop Elements and the full Photoshop
> program tell me if they are very similar to use, with Photoshop just
> having a few more professional features? I've been to the Adobe
> website and I can't find a list comparing features.
[snip]

I can't answer your question, because I haven't used Elements 3.0. (I
use Photoshop CS2). I know someone who uses it after using the full
Photoshop and doesn't see much difference, for him.

But a factor that is sometimes missed when comparing applications is
that of "workflow". For example, someone who comes home with 100s of
Raw files (hardly a beginner!) might find the CS2 way of doing things
better than alternatives. (Certainly better than the CS way).

--
Barry Pearson
http://www.barry.pearson.name/photography/
http://www.birdsandanimals.info/
Anonymous
June 4, 2005 7:18:28 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

N.Coffey wrote:
> Could anyone who has used Photoshop Elements and the full Photoshop
> program tell me if they are very similar to use, with Photoshop just
> having a few more professional features? I've been to the Adobe
> website and I can't find a list comparing features.
>
> If a person had Elements but took a beginners cours in Photoshop,
> would she be able to apply most of what she learned to Elements? A
> friend wants to buy and learn Elements, but the local community
> college only has night courses in Photoshop.
>
> Thank you,
> Nancy
>

Nancy,
Those which come out near eachother in time are usually quite similar
in interface. Instructions for doing things in Photoshop 6 or 7 are
usually the same in PSE2. For PSE3, which is much different, and more
'Mac-like', the newer PS CS2 is likely to be more similar in function.
PSE3 even has some functions PS-CS lacks, such as an organizer. I am
sure that for a beginner's course PSE2 or 3 would be sufficient.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
June 4, 2005 7:19:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Tony wrote:
> There isn't a 900 hundred dollar difference. The guy is completely wrong,
> and probably an idiot.
> Elements does not have the ability to work with 16 bit images which
> makes it useless for professional image editing but certainly good enough
> for most people who don't have a pile of old faded film around that has to
> be restored.
> Instead of taking a course in the wrong program however, I would
> recommend picking up one of the books on Elements. It is not that
> complicated a program. Besides, much of the course would probably be geared
> toward people who want to use Photoshop for graphic design - which is much
> more complicated than using it as an image editor and where all the
> whoop-di-do techniques come in.
>
PSE3 has limited 16 bit operations.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
June 4, 2005 7:43:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sat, 4 Jun 2005 03:16:29 UTC, All Things Mopar
<noneofyour@busi.ness> wrote:

> Download and try the trial version of Paint Shop Pro 9.
> Less than PSE and much more capable.

What can PSP do that PSE can't? I use Elements myself and have been
happy with it, but I don't have any high-end requirements. The job my
friend is going to do suggests using Photoshop and I thought she could
do the work with PSE.

Nancy


--
June 4, 2005 8:03:09 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Not a damn thing - It is essentially a drawing program that has attracted
a bunce of propeller heads who have the same inane attitude as the
Mac-Rulez! dorks.
If you want a program for under 100 dollars that can do 16 bit images, go
to Corel Photo-Paint.

--
http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
The Improved Links Pages are at
http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
A sample chapter from "Haight-Ashbury" is at
http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/writ/hait/hatitl.html

"N.Coffey" <ncoffey@netrover.com> wrote in message
news:t2xTiiDWL9dE-pn2-dCVd6iN8qQXx@localhost...
> On Sat, 4 Jun 2005 03:16:29 UTC, All Things Mopar
> <noneofyour@busi.ness> wrote:
>
> > Download and try the trial version of Paint Shop Pro 9.
> > Less than PSE and much more capable.
>
> What can PSP do that PSE can't? I use Elements myself and have been
> happy with it, but I don't have any high-end requirements. The job my
> friend is going to do suggests using Photoshop and I thought she could
> do the work with PSE.
>
> Nancy
>
>
> --
>
Anonymous
June 4, 2005 8:05:38 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sat, 04 Jun 2005 02:05:32 GMT, "N.Coffey" <ncoffey@netrover.com>
wrote:

>Could anyone who has used Photoshop Elements and the full Photoshop
>program tell me if they are very similar to use, with Photoshop just
>having a few more professional features? I've been to the Adobe
>website and I can't find a list comparing features.
>
>If a person had Elements but took a beginners cours in Photoshop,
>would she be able to apply most of what she learned to Elements? A
>friend wants to buy and learn Elements, but the local community
>college only has night courses in Photoshop.
>
I have Adobe Photoshop 7 and work with it quite bit on digital images.
Even an advanced user of Adobe uses only a relatively small number of
the features. Certain basic tools and techniques are used, and that's
it.

Elements contains all of the basic tools and techniques. It's
doubtful if she'll ever come across the need to use the features in PS
that are not present in Elements unless she's a working with images as
a professional graphics designer doing production work.

I just happened to buy Photoshop early on and upgraded before the less
expensive, but just as useful, Elements came along. Starting over,
I'd buy Elements.




--
Tony Cooper
Orlando FL
Anonymous
June 4, 2005 8:05:39 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Tony Cooper wrote:
> On Sat, 04 Jun 2005 02:05:32 GMT, "N.Coffey" <ncoffey@netrover.com>
> wrote:
>
>> Could anyone who has used Photoshop Elements and the full Photoshop
>> program tell me if they are very similar to use, with Photoshop
>> just
>> having a few more professional features? I've been to the Adobe
>> website and I can't find a list comparing features.
>>
>> If a person had Elements but took a beginners cours in Photoshop,
>> would she be able to apply most of what she learned to Elements? A
>> friend wants to buy and learn Elements, but the local community
>> college only has night courses in Photoshop.
>>
> I have Adobe Photoshop 7 and work with it quite bit on digital
> images.
> Even an advanced user of Adobe uses only a relatively small number
> of
> the features. Certain basic tools and techniques are used, and
> that's
> it.
>
> Elements contains all of the basic tools and techniques. It's
> doubtful if she'll ever come across the need to use the features in
> PS
> that are not present in Elements unless she's a working with images
> as
> a professional graphics designer doing production work.
>
> I just happened to buy Photoshop early on and upgraded before the
> less
> expensive, but just as useful, Elements came along. Starting over,
> I'd buy Elements.

Elements can do most of what Photo Shop can do, is what I understand.
As a confirmed Photo Shop user, I would miss Curves, but not much else
occurs to me. If you never had Curves, Elements might be as complete a
program as nearly everyone would need.
Anonymous
June 4, 2005 8:05:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Frank ess wrote:
> Tony Cooper wrote:
>
>> On Sat, 04 Jun 2005 02:05:32 GMT, "N.Coffey" <ncoffey@netrover.com>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Could anyone who has used Photoshop Elements and the full Photoshop
>>> program tell me if they are very similar to use, with Photoshop just
>>> having a few more professional features? I've been to the Adobe
>>> website and I can't find a list comparing features.
>>>
>>> If a person had Elements but took a beginners cours in Photoshop,
>>> would she be able to apply most of what she learned to Elements? A
>>> friend wants to buy and learn Elements, but the local community
>>> college only has night courses in Photoshop.
>>>
>> I have Adobe Photoshop 7 and work with it quite bit on digital images.
>> Even an advanced user of Adobe uses only a relatively small number of
>> the features. Certain basic tools and techniques are used, and that's
>> it.
>>
>> Elements contains all of the basic tools and techniques. It's
>> doubtful if she'll ever come across the need to use the features in PS
>> that are not present in Elements unless she's a working with images as
>> a professional graphics designer doing production work.
>>
>> I just happened to buy Photoshop early on and upgraded before the less
>> expensive, but just as useful, Elements came along. Starting over,
>> I'd buy Elements.
>
>
> Elements can do most of what Photo Shop can do, is what I understand. As
> a confirmed Photo Shop user, I would miss Curves, but not much else
> occurs to me. If you never had Curves, Elements might be as complete a
> program as nearly everyone would need.
>

There are plugins that will add curves to PSE, for a price. For those
who need this facility.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
June 4, 2005 8:46:57 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

N.Coffey <ncoffey@netrover.com> wrote:
: Could anyone who has used Photoshop Elements and the full Photoshop
: program tell me if they are very similar to use, with Photoshop just
: having a few more professional features? I've been to the Adobe
: website and I can't find a list comparing features.

: If a person had Elements but took a beginners cours in Photoshop,
: would she be able to apply most of what she learned to Elements? A
: friend wants to buy and learn Elements, but the local community
: college only has night courses in Photoshop.

Yes they are very similar. I would characterize the difference as Elemants
is a subset of PS. They look the same and work the same but PS has a few
more High End functions. For most non-professional photogs, Elements is
probably the better bet. Until you (or your friend) gets into more power
editing like for art shows, publications, etc or wishes to move from
photography (with touchup) to ART (with major image manipulation) Elements
will probably do fine.

So your friend will probably do fine taking the PS course and then
applying the learning to PSE. There will be some functions that will not
be available, but learning about layers, edit tools (such as lasso), color
correction, as well as some image distortion tools, you can do this in
either program in the same way.

The one caution I have is that some such courses require the student to
have or get a copy of the program to use for homework. If there is not a
"lab" with the software available for this use your friend may have to get
PS to be able to do all their homework. This is something that your friend
should check before assuming that having PSE at home will suffice.

Randy

==========
Randy Berbaum
Champaign, IL
Anonymous
June 4, 2005 11:42:35 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

<editor@netpath.net> wrote in message
news:1117853660.338446.46110@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> Having used both, I can tell you that both PhotoShop and PhotoShop
> Elements are VERY similar. You sure won't miss the "missing" features
> for about $900 extra!
> OfficeMax has PhotoShop Elements at a real good price.

Hardly a $900 difference, more like $550. I upgraded my PSE 2 to PS for
$300 through a special upgrade Canon had set up with Adobe, it was well
worth it.

Mark
Anonymous
June 4, 2005 8:47:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sat, 4 Jun 2005 04:46:57 UTC, Randy Berbaum
<rberbaum@bluestem.prairienet.org> wrote:
> The one caution I have is that some such courses require the student to
> have or get a copy of the program to use for homework. If there is not a
> "lab" with the software available for this use your friend may have to get
> PS to be able to do all their homework. This is something that your friend
> should check before assuming that having PSE at home will suffice.

Thank you for this useful information. The last paragraph brings up
another question. Is the native file format the same for PSE and PS?
If a person saved a file in the PSE proprietary format, could a person
who only had Photoshop open it and still work on the different layers?
I know that if you save your work as a jpg or tif, you lose the
layers.

Nancy
Anonymous
June 4, 2005 8:47:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

N.Coffey wrote:
> On Sat, 4 Jun 2005 04:46:57 UTC, Randy Berbaum
> <rberbaum@bluestem.prairienet.org> wrote:
>
>>The one caution I have is that some such courses require the student to
>>have or get a copy of the program to use for homework. If there is not a
>>"lab" with the software available for this use your friend may have to get
>>PS to be able to do all their homework. This is something that your friend
>>should check before assuming that having PSE at home will suffice.
>
>
> Thank you for this useful information. The last paragraph brings up
> another question. Is the native file format the same for PSE and PS?
> If a person saved a file in the PSE proprietary format, could a person
> who only had Photoshop open it and still work on the different layers?
> I know that if you save your work as a jpg or tif, you lose the
> layers.
>
> Nancy
Yes, to both.
Compatibility may not go back the other way if PS specific features are
used, however.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
June 4, 2005 10:35:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sat, 04 Jun 2005 16:47:09 GMT, "N.Coffey"
<ncoffey@netrover.com> wrote:

>On Sat, 4 Jun 2005 04:46:57 UTC, Randy Berbaum
><rberbaum@bluestem.prairienet.org> wrote:
>> The one caution I have is that some such courses require the student to
>> have or get a copy of the program to use for homework. If there is not a
>> "lab" with the software available for this use your friend may have to get
>> PS to be able to do all their homework. This is something that your friend
>> should check before assuming that having PSE at home will suffice.
>
>Thank you for this useful information. The last paragraph brings up
>another question. Is the native file format the same for PSE and PS?
>If a person saved a file in the PSE proprietary format, could a person
>who only had Photoshop open it and still work on the different layers?
>I know that if you save your work as a jpg or tif, you lose the
>layers.

Actually TIFF supports all PS features...

But as to the PSD format, it's identical in PSE3 and CS for
example. You can even save a file in CS with (say) curves in
an adjustment layer and PSE can open it *and* render the
curves layer correctly - it just won't allow you to edit it.
You can edit anything allowed and save it, then open it back
up in CS with everything intact.

--
Regards

John Bean
Anonymous
June 5, 2005 12:09:29 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Many thanks to John, Randy, Tony, Barry and everyone else for very
helpful information about these two programs. I found out everything I
wanted to know and then some.

Nancy
Anonymous
June 5, 2005 4:18:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>Dave Martindale wrote ...
>
>How similar is the user interface of PSE to full Photoshop?

Very similar, based on a few days playing with Elements 2 (I just got 3
for free but haven't loaded it) and years using Photoshop.

Bill
Anonymous
June 5, 2005 8:51:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Randy Berbaum <rberbaum@bluestem.prairienet.org> writes:

>Yes they are very similar. I would characterize the difference as Elemants
>is a subset of PS. They look the same and work the same but PS has a few
>more High End functions. For most non-professional photogs, Elements is
>probably the better bet. Until you (or your friend) gets into more power
>editing like for art shows, publications, etc or wishes to move from
>photography (with touchup) to ART (with major image manipulation) Elements
>will probably do fine.

How similar is the user interface of PSE to full Photoshop?

Background: I have a full Photoshop licence, though I haven't upgraded
to the current version. I've also received several copies of the older
Photoshop LE with various pieces of hardware (camera, scanner, etc).
I found PS LE to be a useful tool on machines lacking full PS because
the user interface was essentially the same.

Then I got a copy of Adobe Photo Deluxe (PSE's predecessor). I hated
it. The interface was completely dumbed down, and the "wizards" hid
what was actually going on.

Now there is Photoshop Elements. Is it like PS LE (same interface with
some functions missing) or Photo Deluxe (interface designed for idiots?)

Dave
Anonymous
June 5, 2005 9:16:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sun, 5 Jun 2005 16:51:28 +0000 (UTC), davem@cs.ubc.ca (Dave
Martindale) wrote:

>Randy Berbaum <rberbaum@bluestem.prairienet.org> writes:
>
>>Yes they are very similar. I would characterize the difference as Elemants
>>is a subset of PS. They look the same and work the same but PS has a few
>>more High End functions. For most non-professional photogs, Elements is
>>probably the better bet. Until you (or your friend) gets into more power
>>editing like for art shows, publications, etc or wishes to move from
>>photography (with touchup) to ART (with major image manipulation) Elements
>>will probably do fine.
>
>How similar is the user interface of PSE to full Photoshop?
>
>Background: I have a full Photoshop licence, though I haven't upgraded
>to the current version. I've also received several copies of the older
>Photoshop LE with various pieces of hardware (camera, scanner, etc).
>I found PS LE to be a useful tool on machines lacking full PS because
>the user interface was essentially the same.
>
>Then I got a copy of Adobe Photo Deluxe (PSE's predecessor). I hated
>it. The interface was completely dumbed down, and the "wizards" hid
>what was actually going on.

I'm not sure what you mean by "PSE's predecessor". They are two
completely different kinds of programs. PD was a simple program for
people that didn't want to bother to learn the application for a
number of tools. Elements, like PS, is tool-based. PD had a number
of features built into it for the person that wanted a little fun with
images. To create some of the same fun effects that were built into
PD, you have to have a good command of the tools in Elements and a lot
of add-on filters.

There are times that I use PD, and prefer it over Photoshop7, when I
want a simple fun image. It's really too bad that PD isn't still
available. It's a better program for the person that just wants to
brighten up, crop, and have some fun with an image that most of the
other bundled image programs. I don't know that anyone ever bought
PD. It came bundled with various things. Elements is something you
normally buy for image manipulation.

> or Photo Deluxe (interface designed for idiots?)

I would describe it as a program for people who wanted an easy way to
do fun things with images and not a program for idiots. Not everyone
wants to get involved with the more complicated programs.



--
Tony Cooper
Orlando FL
Anonymous
June 5, 2005 9:18:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

If you have PS7 and do not want to upgrade to PS CS2, does PSE3 give you
anything? I already have album 2.

Barry Pearson wrote:

>N.Coffey wrote:
>
>
>>Could anyone who has used Photoshop Elements and the full Photoshop
>>program tell me if they are very similar to use, with Photoshop just
>>having a few more professional features? I've been to the Adobe
>>website and I can't find a list comparing features.
>>
>>
>[snip]
>
>I can't answer your question, because I haven't used Elements 3.0. (I
>use Photoshop CS2). I know someone who uses it after using the full
>Photoshop and doesn't see much difference, for him.
>
>But a factor that is sometimes missed when comparing applications is
>that of "workflow". For example, someone who comes home with 100s of
>Raw files (hardly a beginner!) might find the CS2 way of doing things
>better than alternatives. (Certainly better than the CS way).
>
>--
>Barry Pearson
>http://www.barry.pearson.name/photography/
>http://www.birdsandanimals.info/
>
>
>
Anonymous
June 5, 2005 9:18:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

measekite wrote:
> If you have PS7 and do not want to upgrade to PS CS2, does PSE3 give you
> anything? I already have album 2.
>
> Barry Pearson wrote:
>
>> N.Coffey wrote:
>>
>>
>>> Could anyone who has used Photoshop Elements and the full Photoshop
>>> program tell me if they are very similar to use, with Photoshop just
>>> having a few more professional features? I've been to the Adobe
>>> website and I can't find a list comparing features.
>>>
>>
>> [snip]
>>
>> I can't answer your question, because I haven't used Elements 3.0. (I
>> use Photoshop CS2). I know someone who uses it after using the full
>> Photoshop and doesn't see much difference, for him.
>>
>> But a factor that is sometimes missed when comparing applications is
>> that of "workflow". For example, someone who comes home with 100s of
>> Raw files (hardly a beginner!) might find the CS2 way of doing things
>> better than alternatives. (Certainly better than the CS way).
>>
>> --
>> Barry Pearson
>> http://www.barry.pearson.name/photography/
>> http://www.birdsandanimals.info/
>>
>>
>>
The organizer in PSE3 is said to be better than Album., and there are
the new 'healing brush', which is great, and the 'separate and
straighten' which is useful if you deal with scanned photos often. The
interface leans heavily toward the 'Mac' interface in appearance.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
June 5, 2005 9:44:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Dave wrote:
>How similar is the user interface of PSE to full Photoshop?

Very. If you've been a longtime user of PhotoShop, you can start
using PhotoShop Elements just fine the minute you install it.

No $4 to park! No $6 admission!
http://stores.ebay.com/INTERNET-GUN-SHOW
Anonymous
June 5, 2005 11:33:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sun, 05 Jun 2005 17:18:40 GMT, measekite
<measekite@juno.com> wrote:

>If you have PS7 and do not want to upgrade to PS CS2, does PSE3 give you
>anything? I already have album 2.

Camera Raw is the most obvious. It also includes a "better"
Album that can handle raw files as well. There's a free
30-day trial, download it and see for yourself.

--
Regards

John Bean
Anonymous
June 6, 2005 12:33:38 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Tony Cooper <tony_cooper213@earthlink.net> writes:

>I'm not sure what you mean by "PSE's predecessor". They are two
>completely different kinds of programs.

In this sense: Adobe has long had a cheaper sibling to Photoshop. For a
while it was PS LE, and that was the only alternative that you saw.
Then PhotoDeluxe started appearing bundled with hardware, and PS LE
seemed to disappear at the same time. Now there is Elements available
everywhere, but I haven't seen PS LE or PD recently, so I assume they've
been discontinued and PSE is the low-end program du jour.

>I would describe it as a program for people who wanted an easy way to
>do fun things with images and not a program for idiots. Not everyone
>wants to get involved with the more complicated programs.

Well, OK. That was a bit of hyperbole. But it's possible to have a
program provide both the simple interface and leave the tools
accessible too. It sounds like PSE does some of this. I hated
PhotoDeluxe because it took away the useful tools and left only the
simplified interface that never did what I wanted.

Dave
Anonymous
June 6, 2005 1:11:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Dave Martindale <davem@cs.ubc.ca> wrote:

> Now there is Photoshop Elements. Is it like PS LE (same interface with
> some functions missing) or Photo Deluxe (interface designed for idiots?)

It is like PS with some functions missing. Well, sort of: it also has a
few extras that mimic Photo Deluxe functions. You don't have to use them
if you don't want to.

It is in fact quite a bargain: 80% of PhotoShop for 20% of the price.
The only bad thing about it is the photo catalog program that is so good
that I'm still searching for a replacement. This is the Mac version,
though; I unstand the MS Windows version is better.
Anonymous
June 8, 2005 12:16:51 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sat, 4 Jun 2005 04:46:57 +0000 (UTC), Randy Berbaum
<rberbaum@bluestem.prairienet.org> wrote:


>The one caution I have is that some such courses require the student to
>have or get a copy of the program to use for homework. If there is not a
>"lab" with the software available for this use your friend may have to get
>PS to be able to do all their homework. This is something that your friend
>should check before assuming that having PSE at home will suffice.

It's ublikely that a school, especially one at the community
college level, would expect students tomake such a purchase. In many
cases, the school, in addition to lab computers, has access to either
a student edition or to a 90-day trial version which should cover the
duration of the course.

When I once took a course in Windows 2000 Server, the 90-day
free version was entirely adequate.
!