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Thermal grease between fan and CPU for ivy bridge processor?

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  • CPUs
  • Fan
  • Processors
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June 20, 2012 4:15:07 AM

Hello, I have purchased a new Intel core-i7 3770 (ivy bridge) processor. It came with a fan, but no thermal grease for between the fan and CPU. The directions included in with the CPU do not mention anything about thermal grease and have you applying the heatsink/fan directly to the CPU. The motherboard's instructions, however, call for the use of thermal grease between the fan and CPU.

I do not plan on overclocking this system, but I anticipate it will be under heavy load on rare occasion.

All my searching has turned up is that the thermal grease inside the chip pack on the new ivy bridge processors is notoriously cheap and should be replaced yourself if you plan to overclock (thereby voiding the warranty).

Do I need to procure thermal grease and apply it to the CPU or am I ok with just the supplied heat sink and fan as per the CPU instructions?

More about : thermal grease fan cpu ivy bridge processor

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a c 186 à CPUs
June 20, 2012 4:20:01 AM

It comes pre applied on the heatsink, look on the bottom of it.
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June 20, 2012 4:25:43 AM

im almost positive it on the heatsink, i cant see them sending out the stock cooler without it
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a b à CPUs
June 20, 2012 4:33:43 AM

Your heatsink should be identical to the one in the photo 'amuffin' posted. There should be no need for thermal paste as it already comes pre-applied to the Intel Heatsink. I would not bother applying my own unless I planned to overclock. However if I planned to do that I would get a different heatsink also.
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a c 146 à CPUs
June 20, 2012 4:47:05 AM

gregaryh said:
All my searching has turned up is that the thermal grease inside the chip pack on the new ivy bridge processors is notoriously cheap and should be replaced yourself if you plan to overclock (thereby voiding the warranty).

The pre-applied paste is perfectly fine for stock operation and would be fine for mild overclocking as well if the heatsink itself was not borderline. The real problems with the stock HSF come 2-4 years later when the plastic parts start loosening up too much, assuming the original install was successful.

The stock HSF basically represents the worst thing you can put on Intel's CPU and still get away with, I doubt using something else which is almost guaranteed to be at least somewhat better would void the warranty unless you RMA a CPU with obvious signs (at least to trained eyes) that fancy thermal paste ended up where there shouldn't be any. If you leave your fingerprints in AS5 on the LGA side, you naturally might expect to run into RMA problems!
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June 20, 2012 7:09:31 AM

Thanks all for the responses.

Yes, my heatsink looks exactly like in the picture posted by amuffin. Learn something new everyday.
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June 27, 2012 4:18:32 AM

Best answer selected by gregaryh.
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